The priest I need

Bishop Jorge Rodriguez

This is the time of year official appointments of pastors and parochial vicars are announced in the Archdiocese of Denver. Expectations are high. Each person has their own ideal of what kind of pastor they want in their parish: “I like him,” “I don’t like him,” “he’s not like the last one,” “the last one was great…” And each person has their own ideal of what kind of pastor their parish needs.

With many expectations, we often await a new priest that preaches like St. Paul, that is entertaining, that knows how to relate to people, that makes miracles with the collection funds, that keeps everything clean and in order, that is always around for when he’s needed, that never gets mad, that is always joyful, that never gets sick, that is a tamer of teenagers…the list can go on.

Yet in reality, the only thing that matters, the only thing that is truly needed, is that he be a holy priest: a priest that we see is in love with Christ when he speaks; that celebrates the sacraments with faith and unction; that teaches us to pray and live a love relationship with God and with our neighbor, and that treats everyone with the same love of God.

A holy priest is a gift from heaven we must ask for. It’s something that can’t be made here on earth or that comes from the human nature of the man called by God to this vocation. Holiness is always a gift from God. Thus, a well-known Spanish prayer for priests ends by saying, “Oh Lord! Send holy and fervent priests to your Church!”

The Church observes the yearly World Day of Prayer for the Sanctification of Priests on the solemnity of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, this year celebrated on June 8.

I think many can concur with the words of the famous film director and actor Mark Wahlberg: “I was married by a priest. My children were baptized by a priest. And whenever somebody in my family passed away, they’ve all been buried by a priest. My sins have been forgiven when I go to confession to a priest. Every time I go to Mass, it’s through a priest’s hands that I receive the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ, which strengthens me to share my Catholic faith with others.”

I ask that you raise a small prayer for your parish priest and all the priests of the archdiocese this June 8 — ask nothing for them except holiness.

COMING UP: The Sistine Chapel comes to Stanley Marketplace

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The Sistine Chapel comes to Stanley Marketplace

Exhibit gives visitors a chance to see Michelangelo’s masterpiece up close

Moira Cullings

Colorado residents will have an opportunity to gaze upon Michelangelo’s famous works of art — right in their own backyard.

The Sistine Chapel exhibit, coming to the Hangar at Stanley Marketplace in Aurora, offers visitors an up-close perspective of Michelangelo’s work.

“At its max, the Sistine Chapel’s ceiling reaches heights of over 60 feet,” said Eric Leong, Associate Producer at SEE Global Entertainment. “But at our exhibit, you can examine the artwork from mere inches away in some instances.

“It’s as if you have the same view Michelangelo did when he originally painted it.”

Co-produced by the Hangar and SEE Global Entertainment, the exhibit will run from July 4 until August 13.

Tickets can be purchased online or at the door, and group tickets are also available.

Visitors explore Michelangelo’s work at the Sistine Chapel exhibit in Tacoma, Washington last year. The exhibit will come to the Hangar at Stanley Marketplace from July 4-August 13. Photos by Lisa Money Photography

Bryant Palmer, Chief Storyteller at Stanley Marketplace, explained that exhibits like the Sistine Chapel embody what Stanley hopes to offer Colorado residents.

“Bringing it to Colorado in a way that’s easily accessible fits right in with pretty much everything we’re trying to do at Stanley Marketplace,” he said.

After visiting the Sistine Chapel during college, Palmer was intrigued but felt that “it wasn’t as intimate as I had hoped for,” he said.

“The biggest thing that I’ve learned since then is how little access you have to see the detail in Michelangelo’s work.”

This exhibit changes the game, offering people the unique chance to see the details.

“The breadth of [Michelangelo’s] work and how many different human figures and expressions he put in the Sistine Chapel is just incredible,” said Palmer. “In this exhibition, you’ll be able to see that and study it from just a couple feet away.”

Both Leong and Palmer emphasized how crucial exhibits like this can be in preserving art and other aspects of history.

“With the recent fire at the Notre Dame Cathedral, we were all reminded how precious our most revered works of art truly are and how important it is to preserve and celebrate them,” said Leong.

“Disasters happen,” said Palmer, “so an exhibition like this really preserves that and makes it something that will last forever.”

The exhibit has already had success in several cities around the world, including Munich, Panama City and Shanghai, and visitors “love being able to absorb the details of the artwork at their own pace in a comfortable environment,” said Leong.

Palmer hopes that will also be the case here in Colorado.

“Art is one of the things that gives meaning to the world, and especially a piece of work like this that really does tell in part the story of humanity,” he said. “I think that’s really powerful.”