Lessons from Charlie Gard

Archbishop Aquila

After living one week short of a year, Baby Charlie Gard passed on to eternal life on July 28th. His brief life and the court battle over his treatment should move us to pray for him and his family and to reflect on the lessons it holds for the ongoing health care debate in our own country.

For those of you who are unfamiliar with the story of Charlie Gard, he was an almost one-year-old English boy with a rare genetic disorder called mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome. The disease damaged his brain and left him unable to move his arms or legs. Over the last few months, Charlie’s parents had to appeal to a series of courts to prevent his doctors from removing him from a ventilator and to allow their child to be admitted to an experimental clinical trial in the U.S.

In Britain, if the parents of a minor or the patient himself disagrees with the doctors about treatment, the disagreement is settled in the court system. This means that the patient is at the mercy of a judge. Charlie’s mother, Connie Yates, described how this resulted in the denial of their request to bring their son home for his final days. She told Sky News, “We just want some peace with our son, no hospital, no lawyers, no courts, no media, just quality time with Charlie away from everything to say goodbye to him in the most loving way. We’ve had no control over our son’s life and no control over our son’s death.”

When Pope Francis heard about the battle over Charlie’s care, he said that he hoped his parents’ wish to “accompany and care for their child” would be respected to the end. Unfortunately, as time and the court battles went on, the damage to his body reached a point that meant the clinical trial in the U.S. was no longer a possibility. And in the end, Charlie was not allowed to go home to die. Instead, the judge ruled that he would be taken to a hospice, where he would be removed from a ventilator and subsequently pass away. Much to the dismay of his parents, this is what happened on July 28th.

As we consider the future of health care in our country and as some politicians call for a government-run system, we should not gloss over the tendency for such systems to usurp the rights of parents to determine what is in their child’s best interest, and for that matter, the rights of patients to manage their own health care.

Another danger is the demand by the government for immoral procedures, such as the Health and Human Services contraception mandate that targeted the Little Sisters of the Poor and others. All too often, one sees state-run health systems make decisions based on a drive for efficiency, a patient’s so-called “quality of life,” or along ideological lines, rather than seeking to uphold patients’ inherent dignity as a human person. In the “throwaway culture” in which we live, our hearts are hardened against caring for those with disabilities and the dying.

Reform efforts for our health system should respect the rights of patients and parents to make decisions about their own medical treatment, the conscience rights of medical professionals and the principal of subsidiarity. The story of Charlie Gard makes the consequences of doing otherwise clear.

While Congress considers repealing the Affordable Care Act, it should also keep in mind that any replacement should treat health care not as a privilege, but a right founded upon the right to life and the God-given dignity of every person. The level of care we extend to the poor and sick should not be curtailed because of their financial means, health or the decisions of hospital officials.

The plight of so many people who are sick and in need of care reminds me of Emma Lazarus’ poem “The Great Colossus,” which can be found in the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty. Lazarus was a Portuguese Sephardic Jew who spent much of her time helping poor and often sick refugees as they arrived at Ward Island near New York City. She wrote, “Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”

I pray that in the coming months our lawmakers will strive to craft legislation that places the dignity of the person at the center of health care, so that our country will continue to care for the sick and downtrodden. Let us also pray for Charlie’s family and all those who are facing medical trials. May our Father grant them peace, wisdom and fortitude.

Charlie Gard. Photo: Facebook, Charlie Gard’s Fight.

COMING UP: Don’t miss ‘the most important archaeological discovery of the 20th century’

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Don’t miss ‘the most important archaeological discovery of the 20th century’

Denver’s Dead Sea Scrolls exhibition brings to life Judaism at time of Jesus

Vladimir Mauricio-Perez

“Welcome to Israel, the Biblical land of milk and honey at the crossroads of Africa, Europe and Asia… an archaeologist’s paradise”: These words mark the start of a once-in-a-lifetime immersion into ancient Israel that the Dead Sea Scrolls exhibition brings to the Denver Museum of Nature and Science March 16 to Sep. 3.

The exhibition, sponsored by the Archdiocese of Denver, not only displays the authentic Dead Sea Scrolls that have captivated millions of believers and non-believers around the world, but also a timeline back to Biblical times filled with ancient objects that date back to events written about in the Old Testament more than 3,000 years ago.

“We are convinced that the Dead Sea Scrolls discovered in the Judean desert are the most important archaeological discovery of the 20th century,” said Dr. Uzi Dahari, deputy director of the Israel Antiquities. “These scrolls, written in Hebrew, are the oldest copy of the Bible.”

In fact, some of these manuscripts are almost a thousand years older than the oldest copies of the Bible that had been discovered, providing a great wealth of knowledge about Judaism at the time of Jesus.

“So many things have changed [since this discovery],” said Dr. Michael Barber, professor of Scripture and Theology at the Augustine Institute in Denver. “We now understand first-century Judaism in a way we didn’t in the past and see how the Biblical authors are breathing the same air as other ancient Jews.”

An exhibition of the Dead Sea Scrolls at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science will be on display until Sept. 3. (Photos by Andrew Wright | Denver Catholic)

The air of first-century Israel was filled with expectations for the coming of the Messiah. The Dead Sea Scrolls, which have been associated with a unique religious Jewish community that lived a structured life, are a witness to this reality, he explained.

“[These communities] were trying to live in such a way as to prepare for the coming of the Messiah. They looked forward to a new covenant and the restoration of the glory of Adam” Dr. Barber said. “We see so many overlaps of how the New Testament is a fulfillment of the Jewish expectations of the time.”

The exhibition immerses guests into the history of the chosen people of God, from artifacts impressed with seals belonging to Biblical kings, such as Hezekiah, to an authentic stone block that fell from Jerusalem’s Western Wall in 70 AD.

“We preferred to select scientifically important items, some very small, some very large… but all of great significance,” Dr. Dahari said.

“Israel’s archaeological sites and artifacts have yielded extraordinary record of human achievement,” added Dr. Risa Levitt Kohn, curator of the exhibit and professor at San Diego State University. “The pots, coins, weapons, jewelry and other artifacts on display in this exhibition constituted a momentous contribution to our cultural legacy. They teach us about the past, but they also teach us about ourselves.”