Radiating beauty ‘grace upon grace’

Holy Name Parish’s dedication of new altar and renovation lead faithful into deeper worship

The paintings, the colors, the sounds and aroma… everything plays its role in the harmony of a church, the beautiful and holy place capable of lifting soul and body to worship the true God wholeheartedly.

Who said liturgical beauty belonged to cathedrals of centuries past?

Holy Name’s renovation and dedication of its new altar, at the hand of Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila May 19, has the goal of bringing the faithful to a “glimpse of heaven on earth,” as Pope Benedict XVI insisted, saying that beauty was not “mere decoration, but rather an essential element of the liturgical action, since it is an attribute of God himself and his revelation.”

“[The renovation is] first and foremost for the glorification of God,” said Father Daniel Cardó, pastor of Holy Name Parish in Denver and member of the Sodalitium of Christian Life. “The whole idea is about how we can love God more, how we can worship in a better way, how we can adore him with even greater reverence.”

Sheridan, Colorado – Dedication of the Altar and blessing of Holy Name Parish celebrated by Most Reverend Samuel J Aquila May 19 (photos by Andrew Wright)

After remodeling the parish hall and offices with the purpose evangelization, formation and spiritual direction, Father Cardó and some parishioners knew that they could do more.

“We were feeling the next step was to beautify our Church, not because it was bad, but because we could benefit from even a better process of beautification and some improvements that ultimately would help us glorify God more and more,” he said.

In gratitude for the abundance of blessings the parish has received through its faithful parishioners in its more than 100 years, the pastor saw this project as a “grace upon grace,” understanding that there is always room for greater love and piety.

“This is possible thanks to the generosity of parishioners,” Father Cardó said. “It was a long process of discernment with [them] and with the architects from Intervention Design Group, who are very, very good.”

Inspired in part by the parish’s existing architectural tradition and the use of colors and patterns by the 19th-century British architect Augustus Pugin, the renovation of the sanctuary, floor, baptistry and other elements at Holy Name Parish serves the purpose of evangelizing through the senses by leading the faithful more deeply into the mystery of the Liturgy – a tradition greatly treasured by the Church.

Knowing about the project, Cardinal Robert Sarah, Prefect for the Congregation of Divine Worship, wrote a unique letter to Father Cardó and the parish community saying, “How beautiful [the dedication] must be, knowing your love for the liturgy!… invoking Almighty God’s blessing upon you and the entire community of Holy Name, especially as you worship the Lord with even greater reverence in your remodeled church.”

After months of celebrating Mass at the renewed parish hall, parishioners awaited with “excitement” and “great expectation” the Dedication of the new Altar and the blessing of the renovated church.

Here are some of the church’s remodeled elements and their meaning:

(Photo by Andrew Wright)

Altar: Made out of marble, the “simple, yet beautiful” altar will contain relics of six great Catholic saints, who will intercede for the parish: St. Augustine, Francis Xavier, Vincent de Paul, Therese of Lisieux, Maria Goretti and Pius X.

 

Chancel area: The blue and red are taken from the

(photo by Andrew Wright)

beautiful Crucifix of Jesus High Priest, which highlights that the sacraments come from the Cross. The background includes the symbols “HIS,” which is the Holy Name of Jesus, along with garden elements, as a reminder that the Liturgy is a renewed Paradise.

 

 

Ceiling: The ceiling of the chancel area and the four panels on top of the altar are blue and contain crosses.

(Photo by Andrew Wright)

This serves as a reminder that a church on earth is the house of God and that through the Liturgy, we are in touch with the heavenly reality, participating in the Liturgy of Heaven. The “Sanctus, Sanctus, Sanctus” also reflects this truth, signaling where Jesus becomes present.

 

Bricks: This solid material connects the whole church, outlining its unity and the unity of the people of God.

(Photo by Andrew Wright)

It allows for the sanctuary to feel renovated but not foreign to the structure of the whole church.

 

Threshold: The threshold from the nave to the sanctuary points to their unity and continuity, but also to the distinction between them. The sanctuary is the Holy of Holy’s, so it is distinguished from the rest of the Church through this symbol and others, such as the marble and tile.

 

 

(Photo by Andrew Wright)

Floor: The new floor contains symbolic elements – crosses and diamonds – which give the Church a sense of direction, pointing to the presence of Christ in the sanctuary. It also gives visual unity to the building, connecting altar, crucifix and tabernacle.

 

 

 

(Photo by Andrew Wright)

Tiles: Three unique tiles will be placed in the Church: the Immaculate Heart of Mary in the back, the Sacred Heart of Jesus in the middle and the Trinity in the front. This explains that from Mary we go to Jesus and, through Jesus, to the mystery of God.

 

Steps: The verse “At the name of Jesus every knee shall bend” is divided and painted on the three steps. Although this may not be visible from the back, a church must communicate symbolically, and some elements are meant to reveal themselves the closer a person approaches them.

 

Baptistery: Positioned in the back and to the side, the new baptistery allows for a procession to the altar.

(Photo by Andrew Wright)

It has a blue ceiling, because there we become children of God, and octagons and crosses on the floor. The octagon symbolized the eight day, the New Creation through baptism, and the cross stresses the origin of baptism, which is the open side of Jesus.

 

COMING UP: Read Archbishop Aquila’s letter in response to the Pennsylvania Grand Jury Report

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The following letter written by Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila in response to the Pennsylvania Grand Jury report was read at all weekend Masses Aug. 17-18.

18 August 2018

My dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,

I write to you today with great sadness to respond to yet another scandal that has shaken the Church. Even though many of the details in the Grand Jury Report in Pennsylvania had already been reported, the full release was still undeniably shocking and its contents devasting to read. We face the undeniable fact that the Church has gone through a dark and shameful time, and while a clear majority of the Report addresses incidents occurring 20+ years in the past, we know that sin has a lasting impact and amends need to be made.

Many children have suffered from cruel behavior for which they bore no responsibility. I offer my apology for any way that the Church, its cardinals, bishops, priests, deacons, or laity have failed to live up to Jesus’ call to holiness. I especially offer this apology to the survivors, for the past abuses and for those who knowingly allowed the abuse to occur. I also apologize to the clergy who have been faithful and are deeply discouraged by these reports.

Everyone has the right to experience the natural feelings of grief as they react to this trauma – shock; denial; anger; bargaining; and depression. I want you to know I feel those emotions as well – especially anger. I believe the best way to recover is a return to God’s plan for human sexuality. In response to the Archbishop McCarrick revelations, I have written at length about the spiritual battle we are facing. That letter can be found on the archdiocese’s home page – archden.org.

I ask everyone to pray for the Church in Pennsylvania, though these dioceses over the last 20 years have greatly evolved from how they are described in the Grand Jury Report, the Church must face its past sins with great patience, responsibility, repentance and conversion.

Creating an environment where children are safe from abuse remains a top priority in the Archdiocese of Denver. In our archdiocese, we require background checks and Safe Environment Training for all priests, deacons, employees, and any volunteers who are around children. During this training, everyone is taught their role as a mandatory reporter, and what steps to follow if they witness or even suspect abuse. We also require instruction for children and young people, where they are taught about safe and appropriate boundaries, and to tell a trusted adult if they ever feel uncomfortable. We participate in regular independent audits of our practices, and we have been found in compliance every year since the national audit began in 2003.

Finally, while we have made strides to improve our Archdiocese, I am aware that the wounds of past transgressions remain. We are committed to helping victims of abuse and we are willing to meet with anyone who believes they have been mistreated.

I urge all of us to pray for holiness, for the virtues, and for a deeper relationship with Jesus Christ. Only he and he alone can heal us, forgive us, and bring us to the Father. Be assured of my prayers for all of you and most especially the victims of any type of sexual abuse committed by anyone.

Sincerely yours in Christ,
Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila