Rally to defund Planned Parenthood draws nearly 200 supporters

Aaron Lambert

A crowd of nearly 200 gathered outside of Planned Parenthood in Stapleton Saturday, calling for the defunding of the organization.

The rally was one of 228 similar ones that occurred across the nation and were sponsored by Citizens for a Pro-Life Society, Created Equal and the Pro-Life Action League in conjunction with local pro-life groups all over the country.

The event featured several speakers, including Bethany Janzen of Students for Life of America and Father Andre Mahanna, pastor of St. Rafka’s Maronite Catholic Church in Lakewood, who led the group in prayer.

DENVER, CO - FEBRUARY 11: Fr. Andre Mahanna, pastor of St. Rafka Maronite Catholic Church, leads the crowd in prayer during the rally to defund Planned Parenthood across the street from Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains on February 11, 2017, in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Anya Semenoff/Denver Catholic)

Father Andre Mahanna, pastor of St. Rafka Maronite Catholic Church, leads the crowd in prayer during the rally to defund Planned Parenthood across the street from Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains on February 11, 2017, in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Anya Semenoff/Denver Catholic)

The protest was peaceful in nature and was met with little opposition at the site. Protesters sought to send a message of love and argued that the federal funds allocated to Planned Parenthood be directed toward other federal health centers that don’t provide abortions.

“The main message is that there is hope, that life is valuable, human life at whatever stage, age, development and that we can actually stand, we can make a difference, we can love both the mother and child,” Janzen said.

Hours after this rally, Planned Parenthood supporters gathered outside of Senator Cory Gardner’s office to call on him to vote to keep the organization funded.

DENVER, CO - FEBRUARY 11: Bethany Janzen, the Rocky Mountain Regional Coordinator for Students for Life, speaks during a rally to defund Planned Parenthood across the street from Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains on February 11, 2017, in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Anya Semenoff/Denver Catholic)

Bethany Janzen, the Rocky Mountain Regional Coordinator for Students for Life, speaks during a rally to defund Planned Parenthood across the street from Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains on February 11, 2017, in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Anya Semenoff/Denver Catholic)

Planned Parenthood claims that without federal funds, thousands of women would be left without affordable reproductive healthcare, including access to contraception, testing and treatment of sexually-transmitted diseases, and other services such as breast cancer screenings. However, controversies regarding the services Planned Parenthood actually provides have arose in the past.

For those women looking for alternatives to Planned Parenthood for health care, Denver is home to a variety of clinics that offer that same sort of care and support, including Marisol Health, a Catholic-run organization that provides free ultrasounds, STD testing and treatment, OB/GYN services and more.

COMING UP: Catholic Charities joins with St. Raphael Counseling to increase services

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Two Catholic counseling agencies serving the Denver Archdiocese have united to expand services to the community, officials said. The change was effective May 1.

St. Raphael Counseling, founded in 2009, has partnered with Catholic Charities’ Sacred Heart Counseling (formerly Regina Caeli Clinical Services), which was established in 2011. The two are now one ministry under Catholic Charities of Denver sharing the name St. Raphael Counseling.

Licensed clinical psychologist Jim Langley, co-founder of St. Raphael’s, will serve as director.

“Frankly, it seemed kind of silly for two entities to be doing the same thing from the same pool of resources,” Langley told the Denver Catholic.  “I reached out to [Catholic Charities] … to see about removing obstacles. It really must have been from the Lord because there weren’t any big obstacles.”

The combined resources mean clients seeking care aligned with Catholic values will now have access to more therapists and locations: a total of 18 clinicians at 11 offices and six schools across the Front Range region, including Denver, Littleton and northern Colorado.

In the coming months, St. Raphael’s will accept more insurances and will introduce diagnostic testing for behavioral and learning disorders and Autism to families at affordable cost, Langley said.

“We are excited to welcome the team of psychologists from St. Raphael Counseling to Catholic Charities,” said Amparo García, interim president and CEO of Catholic Charities of Denver. “Under Dr. Langley’s guidance, and with his expertise and business acumen, the team has built a trusted and professional counseling service that is faithful to the Church and compassionate to those in need.

“We are optimistic that offering expanded services in a combined organization will provide an added benefit to the community.”

St. Raphael’s offers individuals, couples and families clinical counseling services for issues ranging from depression and anxiety to grief and addiction. It also offers marriage preparation, school counseling, psychological evaluations for seminary applicants, and counseling for priests and religious. It provides outreach and education through presentations and retreats that integrate psychology and spirituality.

St. Raphael’s is named after the Archangel Raphael, who in the Old Testament Book of Tobit is sent by God to help the young man Tobias confront nature and evil. Raphael helps to bring healing to Tobias’ family. Of Hebrew origin, Raphael means “God heals.”

“The name was chosen very deliberately,” Langley said. “We [as therapists] are only instruments of God’s healing, God’s medicine; it’s ultimately God who heals.

“One of the ways the Lord has given us as a path to holiness is through our own brokenness,” he added. “We all have emotional wounds and the healing of these wounds helps us to become the saints God made us to be.

“We work with individuals and families to help them face their woundedness, their brokenness. We do it in a way that is supportive of their Catholic values and can leverage all the awesome, beautiful things about Catholic spirituality that can help us grow as people.”

The recent suicides of celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain and fashion designer Kate Spade show that no one is immune from depression and suicidal thoughts, Langley said.

“Even St. Therese [of Lisieux] said there were moments when she was tempted by the medicine bottle on the nightstand,” he noted about the saint who was named a Doctor of the Church in 1997. “We think of her as being a joyful saint, yet she too struggled immensely with depression.

“If people are struggling, they need help,” Langley said. “But counseling isn’t just for people with big issues. It’s also for those who have normal issues and are trying to have a healthy family life.

“There’s nobody who doesn’t need support and good human relationships.”

RAPHAEL COUNSELING

Visit: straphaelcounseling.com

Phone: 720-377-1359