Rally to defund Planned Parenthood draws nearly 200 supporters

Aaron Lambert
DENVER, CO - FEBRUARY 11: A crowd gathers for the rally to defund Planned Parenthood across the street from Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains on February 11, 2017, in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Anya Semenoff/Denver Catholic)

A crowd of nearly 200 gathered outside of Planned Parenthood in Stapleton Saturday, calling for the defunding of the organization.

The rally was one of 228 similar ones that occurred across the nation and were sponsored by Citizens for a Pro-Life Society, Created Equal and the Pro-Life Action League in conjunction with local pro-life groups all over the country.

The event featured several speakers, including Bethany Janzen of Students for Life of America and Father Andre Mahanna, pastor of St. Rafka’s Maronite Catholic Church in Lakewood, who led the group in prayer.

DENVER, CO - FEBRUARY 11: Fr. Andre Mahanna, pastor of St. Rafka Maronite Catholic Church, leads the crowd in prayer during the rally to defund Planned Parenthood across the street from Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains on February 11, 2017, in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Anya Semenoff/Denver Catholic)

Father Andre Mahanna, pastor of St. Rafka Maronite Catholic Church, leads the crowd in prayer during the rally to defund Planned Parenthood across the street from Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains on February 11, 2017, in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Anya Semenoff/Denver Catholic)

The protest was peaceful in nature and was met with little opposition at the site. Protesters sought to send a message of love and argued that the federal funds allocated to Planned Parenthood be directed toward other federal health centers that don’t provide abortions.

“The main message is that there is hope, that life is valuable, human life at whatever stage, age, development and that we can actually stand, we can make a difference, we can love both the mother and child,” Janzen said.

Hours after this rally, Planned Parenthood supporters gathered outside of Senator Cory Gardner’s office to call on him to vote to keep the organization funded.

DENVER, CO - FEBRUARY 11: Bethany Janzen, the Rocky Mountain Regional Coordinator for Students for Life, speaks during a rally to defund Planned Parenthood across the street from Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains on February 11, 2017, in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Anya Semenoff/Denver Catholic)

Bethany Janzen, the Rocky Mountain Regional Coordinator for Students for Life, speaks during a rally to defund Planned Parenthood across the street from Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains on February 11, 2017, in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Anya Semenoff/Denver Catholic)

Planned Parenthood claims that without federal funds, thousands of women would be left without affordable reproductive healthcare, including access to contraception, testing and treatment of sexually-transmitted diseases, and other services such as breast cancer screenings. However, controversies regarding the services Planned Parenthood actually provides have arose in the past.

For those women looking for alternatives to Planned Parenthood for health care, Denver is home to a variety of clinics that offer that same sort of care and support, including Marisol Health, a Catholic-run organization that provides free ultrasounds, STD testing and treatment, OB/GYN services and more.

COMING UP: What does “bearing witness” to our culture look like?

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What does “bearing witness” to our culture look like?

Rev. Paul Scalia calls us to imitate ancient prophets in final lecture of Archbishop’s Series

Therese Aaker
Screenshot 2017-03-22 11.49.54

Bearing witness to our culture hangs on this deeply personal question: “Are we convinced that what has been given to us will satisfy the human heart?”

It’s a question that Reverend Paul Scalia, son of late Justice Antonin Scalia, asked the crowd in his talk March 21, the final lecture of the season in the Archbishop’s Lecture Series.

Listen to the full talk here

Titled “The Word of the Lord Came to Me…,” his talk explained how ancient prophets show us how to be examples of our faith in our modern culture. The most important lesson from their stories is that we first have deep conviction in that which we bear witness to.

“Authenticity requires that these words come from within us — only our personal investment in the Gospel can make us authentic prophets,” Reverend Scalia said.

We especially need to be connected to that firm conviction inside ourselves in the areas where the culture needs it most; namely, marriage and family life, Reverend Scalia said.

He outlined other various areas where we can imitate the ancient prophets, who were seen as “odd” in their respective countries at the time. He referred to Flannery O’Connor, who is attributed to the quote, “You shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you odd.”

“Bearing witness to the truth might make you odd,” Reverend Scalia said. The ancient prophets were often seen as outsiders in their own homes, and we must be ready to not fit in as well. We are “strangers in a strange land,” especially as people in our culture are increasingly indifferent toward religion.

“This religious indifference is a challenge for the Church as well. [We’ve] had to scale back. Denver is fairly unique in its growth,” Reverend Scalia said.

March 21, 2017, Denver, Colorado Archbishop Lecture Series featuring Fr. Paul Scalia, a priest from the Diocese of Arlington speaking on the topic of the importance of prophetic Catholic witness in the culture today. Photo by Andrew Wright/Denver Catholic

March 21, 2017, Denver, Colorado Archbishop Lecture Series featuring Fr. Paul Scalia, a priest from the Diocese of Arlington speaking on the topic of the importance of prophetic Catholic witness in the culture today. Photo by Andrew Wright/Denver Catholic

He said that we also need to be witnesses to both the past and the future. This doesn’t mean we are harbingers of doom; rather, we “proclaim not what will happen, but what God has already done,” Reverend Scalia said.

“The failure to remember what God has done creates a mistrust of what God will do in the future,” Reverend Scalia continued. “Our role should be one of giving hope, especially to those who are suffering.”

Our testimony message needs to be this hope, “that the Lord is trustworthy,” he said.

He also noted that acts of charity and the suffering we experience for love of God and neighbor are the biggest opportunities to bear bold witness to our culture.

“If we aren’t suffering, we are compromising on our love of the Lord, or of our love for people,” Reverend Scalia said. “The Lord allows suffering as a way of understanding the sadness and pain in his own heart.”

“Suffering, in the end, is the most convincing witness to the truth,” he added.