Love St. Thérèse? Here are 3 events for her feast around the Archdiocese

Therese Bussen

St. Thérèse of Lisieux is, according to Pope Pius X, “the greatest saint of modern times” — so much so that St. John Paul II declared her a Doctor of the Church, the youngest so far.

If you love her, there are a few events around the Archdiocese of Denver where you can celebrate her feast day, which is Oct. 1.

“Rose Petal Evening” with Community of the Beatitudes
Celebrate the feast of St. Thérèse with an evening of praising the Lord with poems and songs from the saint and asking her intercession. Bring a rose and a self-addressed and stamped envelope (optional).
Sept. 29: St. Catherine of Siena Parish, 7 p.m.
Oct. 5: St. Frances Cabrini Parish, 7 p.m.

Feast Day Celebration with St. Thérèse of Lisieux
Mass to celebrate the feast of St. Thérèse will be held at the Carmelite Monastary. Mass will be celebrated by Fr. Nicholas Larkin with a blessing and distribution of roses.
Oct. 3: Carmelite Monastary, 6138 S Gallup St., 80120
Cost: Free

FOCUS Presents: “An Evening with Thérèse”
The Fellowship of Catholic University Students at CU Boulder present a unique fundraiser. Keynote speaker is Bishop Jorge Rodriguez. Enjoy wine, hors d’oeuvres, a silent auction and delectable dinner.
Oct. 6: Sacred Heart of Mary Church, 6739 S. Boulder Rd.
Cost: Individual ticket if before Sept. 18, discounts available online.
Contact: Janet Driscoll, 303-898-8865 or

COMING UP: Don’t miss ‘the most important archaeological discovery of the 20th century’

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Don’t miss ‘the most important archaeological discovery of the 20th century’

Denver’s Dead Sea Scrolls exhibition brings to life Judaism at time of Jesus

Vladimir Mauricio-Perez

“Welcome to Israel, the Biblical land of milk and honey at the crossroads of Africa, Europe and Asia… an archaeologist’s paradise”: These words mark the start of a once-in-a-lifetime immersion into ancient Israel that the Dead Sea Scrolls exhibition brings to the Denver Museum of Nature and Science March 16 to Sep. 3.

The exhibition, sponsored by the Archdiocese of Denver, not only displays the authentic Dead Sea Scrolls that have captivated millions of believers and non-believers around the world, but also a timeline back to Biblical times filled with ancient objects that date back to events written about in the Old Testament more than 3,000 years ago.

“We are convinced that the Dead Sea Scrolls discovered in the Judean desert are the most important archaeological discovery of the 20th century,” said Dr. Uzi Dahari, deputy director of the Israel Antiquities. “These scrolls, written in Hebrew, are the oldest copy of the Bible.”

In fact, some of these manuscripts are almost a thousand years older than the oldest copies of the Bible that had been discovered, providing a great wealth of knowledge about Judaism at the time of Jesus.

“So many things have changed [since this discovery],” said Dr. Michael Barber, professor of Scripture and Theology at the Augustine Institute in Denver. “We now understand first-century Judaism in a way we didn’t in the past and see how the Biblical authors are breathing the same air as other ancient Jews.”

An exhibition of the Dead Sea Scrolls at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science will be on display until Sept. 3. (Photos by Andrew Wright | Denver Catholic)

The air of first-century Israel was filled with expectations for the coming of the Messiah. The Dead Sea Scrolls, which have been associated with a unique religious Jewish community that lived a structured life, are a witness to this reality, he explained.

“[These communities] were trying to live in such a way as to prepare for the coming of the Messiah. They looked forward to a new covenant and the restoration of the glory of Adam” Dr. Barber said. “We see so many overlaps of how the New Testament is a fulfillment of the Jewish expectations of the time.”

The exhibition immerses guests into the history of the chosen people of God, from artifacts impressed with seals belonging to Biblical kings, such as Hezekiah, to an authentic stone block that fell from Jerusalem’s Western Wall in 70 AD.

“We preferred to select scientifically important items, some very small, some very large… but all of great significance,” Dr. Dahari said.

“Israel’s archaeological sites and artifacts have yielded extraordinary record of human achievement,” added Dr. Risa Levitt Kohn, curator of the exhibit and professor at San Diego State University. “The pots, coins, weapons, jewelry and other artifacts on display in this exhibition constituted a momentous contribution to our cultural legacy. They teach us about the past, but they also teach us about ourselves.”