Need to find a Holy Week Mass?

Aaron Lambert

Holy Week is the summit of the liturgical year in the Catholic Church. It kicks off with Palm Sunday, marking the beginning of Holy Week, and the Triduum comprised of Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday in Easter Sunday are three of the single most important — and moving — days in the Church’s life.

The Masses that make up Holy Week are some of the most beautiful liturgies of the Church. Below is a (non-comprehensive) list of Holy Thursday, Good Friday, Holy Saturday and Easter Sunday Masses, gathered in one place, so you don’t have to worry about missing Mass during Holy Week.

Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception
1530 Logan St., Denver

Holy Thursday
5:30 p.m.
Good Friday
3 p.m.
Holy Saturday
8:15 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m.

Holy Family Parish
4377 Utica St., Denver

Holy Thursday
7 p.m.
Good Friday
3 p.m.
Holy Saturday
8 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
8 a.m., 9:30 a.m., 11 a.m. (Spanish)

Holy Ghost Parish
1800 California St., Denver

Holy Thursday
5:30 p.m.
Good Friday
12 p.m., 8 p.m. Tenebrae
Holy Saturday
8:15 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 10 a.m. (Latin), 12 p.m., 5:10 p.m.

Light of the World Parish
10316 W. Bowles Ave., Littleton

Holy Thursday
7 p.m.
Good Friday
7 p.m.
Holy Saturday
8 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
8 a.m., 10:30 a.m.

Mother Cabrini Shrine
20189 Cabrini Blvd., Golden

Holy Thursday
7 p.m.
Good Friday
2 p.m.
Holy Saturday
8 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
8 a.m., 11 a.m., 2 p.m. (Spanish)

Nativity of Our Lord Parish
900 W. Midway Blvd., Broomfield

Holy Thursday
7 p.m.
Good Friday
4 p.m.
Holy Saturday
8 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
6:30 a.m., 8 a.m., 10 a.m., 12 p.m.

Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish
11385 Grant Dr., Northglenn

Holy Thursday
7 p.m.
Good Friday
3 p.m.
Holy Saturday
8:30 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
7 a.m., 9 a.m., 9:30 a.m., 10 a.m. (Frassati) 11 a.m., 11:30 a.m.

Our Lady of Mount Carmel Parish
3549 Navajo St., Denver

Holy Thursday
7 p.m.
Good Friday
7 p.m.
Holy Saturday
8 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
7 a.m., 9 a.m., 11 a.m.

Queen of Peace Parish
13120 E. Kentucky Ave., Aurora

Holy Thursday
5:30 p.m., 8 p.m. (Spanish)
Good Friday
5:30 p.m., 8 p.m. (Spanish)
Holy Saturday
8:15 p.m. Vigil (Tri-lingual)
Easter Sunday
7:30 a.m., 9:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 5 p.m., 1:30 p.m. (Spanish), 7 p.m. (Spanish)

St. James Parish
1311 Oneida St., Denver

Holy Thursday
5:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. (Spanish)
Good Friday
5:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. (Spanish)
Holy Saturday
8 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
8 a.m., 10 a.m., 12 p.m. (Spanish)

St. Joan of Arc Parish
12735 W. 58th Ave., Arvada

Holy Thursday
7 p.m.
Good Friday
3 p.m.
Holy Saturday
8:30 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
6:30 a.m., 8 a.m., 10 a.m.

St. Michael the Archangel Parish
19099 E. Floyd Ave., Aurora

Holy Thursday
7 p.m.
Good Friday
3 p.m., 7 p.m.
Holy Saturday
8:30 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
6:45 a.m., 8:45 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 12:30 a.m., 2:30 p.m. (Spanish)

Sts. Peter and Paul Parish
3900 Pierce St., Wheat Ridge

Holy Thursday
7 p.m.
Good Friday
3 p.m.
Holy Saturday
8:15 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
7 a.m., 9 a.m., 11 a.m.

St. Thomas More Parish
8035 S. Quebec St., Centennial

Holy Thursday
7 p.m.
Good Friday
7 p.m.
Holy Saturday
8:15 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
6:30 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m.

St. John the Evangelist Parish
1730 W. 12th St., Loveland

Holy Thursday
7 p.m.
Good Friday
3 p.m., 7:30 p.m. (Spanish)
Holy Saturday
8:30 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
7 a.m., 9 a.m., 11 a.m., 1 p.m. (Spanish)

Grand Catholic
grandcatholic.com

Holy Thursday
6:30 p.m. at Our Lady of the Snow and St. Peter
Good Friday
6:30 p.m. at Our Lady of the Snow and St. Peter
Holy Saturday
8:15 p.m. Vigil at Our Lady of the Snow and St. Peter
Easter Sunday
St. Bernard – 7 a.m., 9 a.m.
St. Anne – 8 a.m.
Our Lady of the Snow – 9:30 a.m.
St. Ignatius – 1 p.m.

Summit Catholic
summitcatholic.org

Holy Thursday
6:30 p.m. at Our Lady of Peace and St. Mary
Good Friday
3 p.m., 6:30 p.m. (Spanish) at Our Lady of Peace, 3 p.m. at St. Mary
Holy Saturday
8:15 p.m. Vigil at Our Lady of Peace and St. Mary
Easter Sunday
Our Lady of Peace – 8 a.m., 10 a.m., 12 p.m. (Spanish)
St. Mary – 6 a.m., 8 a.m., 10 a.m.

St. Peter Parish
915 12th St, Greeley

Holy Thursday
7 p.m.
Good Friday
3 p.m.
Holy Saturday
8:15 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 10 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 7 p.m.

St. Mary Parish
2222 23rd Ave., Greeley

Holy Thursday
7 p.m.
Good Friday
3 p.m.
Holy Saturday
7 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
8 a.m., 10 a.m., 12 p.m.

St. Louis Parish
902 Grant Ave., Louisville

Holy Thursday
5:45 p.m.
Good Friday
3 p.m.
Holy Saturday
8:30 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
7:30 a.m., 9 a.m., 11:15 a.m.

St. Stephen Parish
1885 Blake Ave., Glenwood Springs

Holy Thursday
7 p.m.
Good Friday
7 p.m.
Holy Saturday
8 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
8 a.m., 10 a.m., 12 p.m.

St. Anthony Parish
326 S. 3rd St., Sterling

Holy Thursday
7 p.m.
Good Friday
7 p.m.
Holy Saturday
8:15 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
7 a.m., 9 a.m., 10 a.m. at St. Catherine

Our Lady of Lourdes Parish
2200 S. Logan St., Denver

Holy Thursday
7 p.m.
Good Friday
3 p.m.
Holy Saturday
8:15 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
8:45 a.m., 11 a.m.

Our Lady of Loreto Parish
18000 E. Arapahoe Rd., Foxfield

Holy Thursday
7 p.m.
Good Friday
7 p.m.
Holy Saturday
8 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
5 a.m., 7 a.m., 9 a.m., 11 a.m.

Mullen Home for the Aged
3629 W. 29th Ave., Denver

Holy Thursday
4:30 p.m
Good Friday
3 p.m.
Holy Saturday
8 p.m. Vigil
Easter Sunday
10:30 a.m.

COMING UP: Healing hatred and anger after Charlottesville

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The confrontation in Charlottesville, Virginia, and the nationwide reaction to it are clear signs of the tensions simmering just below the surface of our society. But we know as people of faith that these wounds can be healed if we follow Christ’s example, rather than the path of revenge.

It was with a heavy heart that I learned about the Aug. 12 clashes between white supremacists and counter protesters in Charlottesville that resulted in the injury of around 34 people and the death of Heather Heyer. It was an “eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth” melee.

These events remind me of Pope Francis’ 2017 World Day of Peace message, in which he pointed out that “Jesus himself lived in violent times. Yet he taught that the true battlefield, where violence and peace meet, is the human heart: for ‘it is from within, from the human heart, that evil intentions come’ (Mk. 7:21).”

What we witnessed in Charlottesville was an outward expression of hundreds of hearts, and as a shepherd of souls, I cannot stand by silently while people allow hatred toward others rule their hearts. Particularly reprehensible were the derogatory words the neo-Nazis and their white supremacist allies shouted toward African Americans, Jews and Latinos. This is not how God sees his children!

Every human being is bestowed from the moment of conception with the dignity of being made in the image and likeness of God, and we are all loved by him, even amid our sin and brokenness. Satan seeks every opportunity to twist these fundamental truths in the hearts of human beings and we can see the devastation it brings throughout history.

It can be tempting to respond to these attacks on our fellow man with violence, just as the members of the Anti-fascist movement (known as “Antifa”) did in Charlottesville. But this is not what Christ taught, since it allows hatred to gain a foothold through a different avenue. It is worth repeating: the human heart is the true battlefield.

Jesus’ response to violence and persecution stands in contrast with the way of hatred and anger. Instead, he taught his disciples to love their enemies (Mt. 5:44) and to turn the other cheek (Mt. 5:39). Christ’s radical answer is only possible because God unconditionally loves every person and is ready to forgive us when we repent. God’s love is the only thing that can cut through the hatred that is bringing people to blows, heal the human heart and form it after his own. As people of faith, we are called to bring the truth of love to these festering wounds so that hearts may be healed by Christ.

Joseph Pearce, the Catholic convert and former white supremacist, is a perfect example of this. In a recent article for the National Catholic Register, he recalls how it was his encounter with the objective truths of the faith that demolished his race-centered identity and seeing his enemies love him when he confronted them with hatred that changed his heart. We must pray for the grace to love as Jesus loves, to love as the Father loves.

“The way out of this deadly spiral,” Pearce says, “is to go beyond the love of neighbor, as necessary as that is, and to begin to love our enemies. This is not simply good for us, freeing us from the bondage of hatred; it is good for our enemies also.”

May all of us follow the great example of Mark Heyer, the father of the woman who was killed after the white supremacist rally. His daughter’s death, Heyer told USA Today, made him think “about what the Lord said on the cross, ‘Forgive them. They don’t know what they’re doing.’”

Jesus desires that every person have a heart that is whole and free from hatred, anger and pride. He desires to form our hearts, and that only comes about when we are receptive to his unconditional love, for only in receiving his unconditional love will we be able to give it to others. I pray that all the faithful will be instruments of healing for our country by bringing Christ’s forgiveness to their neighbors and their enemies.