‘You belong to the Father,’ Archbishop tells Bishop Rodriguez at ordination

Aaron Lambert

It was a joyous day for the Archdiocese of Denver Nov. 4, when new auxiliary Bishop Jorge Rodriguez was consecrated to the fullness of the sacrament of Holy Orders by Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila, Archbishop Jose Gomez of Los Angeles and Cardinal J. Francis Stafford.

Watch the full ordination of Bishop Rodriguez here.

Watch highlights and hear Bishop Rodriguez reflections of the ceremony here.

Over 200 priests and deacons, 10 bishops, one abbot and countless friends, family and laypeople filled Denver’s Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception for the occasion. Archbishop Christophe Pierre, apostolic nuncio to the United States, was also in attendance and read Pope Francis’ apostolic mandate dated Aug. 25 appointing Bishop Rodriguez to the episcopal office.

“Beloved son, as we place this responsibility upon you, it is our fervent prayer to the Lord that you zealously serve the faithful in the Mile High City so very dear to us and who are under the protection of the blessed Virgin Mary, the Immaculate Conception and the paternal intercession of St. Francis of Assisi,” the Holy Father wrote in the letter.

DENVER, CO - OCTOBER 4: Bishop-Elect Jorge Rodriguez supplicates himself before the altar during his Episcopal Ordination Mass at the Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception on November 4, 2016, in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Anya Semenoff/Denver Catholic)

Bishop-Elect Jorge Rodriguez prostrates himself before the altar during his Episcopal Ordination Mass at the Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception on Nov. 4. (Photo by Anya Semenoff/Denver Catholic)

During his homily, Archbishop Aquila recounted meeting Bishop Rodriguez 18 years ago in Rome, as the rector of the newly-opened St. John Vianney Theological Seminary looking for new faculty.

“Neither you nor I and that point in history knew what God’s plan would be for our lives, and little did you know that almost two decades later, you would become the auxiliary bishop,” he told the new bishop.

Archbishop Aquila urged Bishop Rodriguez to heed closely the prayer of Jesus from the Gospel of John (Jn 6, 14-19) read at the ordination Mass and recognize that it is a prayer that extends to his ministry as the auxiliary bishop of Denver.

“Listen to the prayer of Jesus in the Gospel you have chosen for today,” Archbishop Aquila said. “That prayer is prayed not only for the disciples, but it is prayed by Jesus for you today. You belong to the Father.”

DENVER, CO - OCTOBER 4: Bishop Jorge Rodriguez thanks the assembled during the Episcopal Ordination Mass at the Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception on November 4, 2016, in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Anya Semenoff/Denver Catholic)

Bishop Jorge Rodriguez thanks the assembled during his Episcopal Ordination Mass. (Photo by Anya Semenoff/Denver Catholic)

He added, “Let the words of Jesus penetrate your own heart, for it is he and the Spirit and the Father who consecrate you today as their bishop.”

Archbishop Aquila told Bishop Rodriguez he would be a “tremendous blessing” for the Latino community in northern Colorado, where 60 parishes offer Masses said in Spanish and over 50% of Catholics come from a Latino background.

For his concluding remarks, Bishop Rodriguez expressed his gratitude to the Lord and to all who have supported and prayed for him as he enters into the episcopate. He was especially grateful to the faithful he has served during his 10 years of service to the Archdiocese of Denver.

“I love you all,” he told the congregation. “You cannot imagine how important you’ve been in my life. The most important gift I have received are the people in the pews.”

COMING UP: Celebrate and support the sacred gift of life

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Editor’s Note: This column is adapted from Archbishop Aquila’s remarks to the 2018 Celebrate Life March, which took place on January 13th in front of the Colorado State Capitol building.

As we gather today to celebrate life, we must remember three things: 1) life is a gift, 2) life is sacred, and 3) rebuilding a culture of life requires joy.

We are here today to celebrate our joy over the gift of life. Every minute and every day we live presents us with an abundance of gifts that seem mundane and are often overlooked: our health, the gift of creation, or something as simple as having food on our plates. Above all, we should give thanks for the gift of life!

As people involved in protecting life at every stage, the challenge we face is not just one of providing resources to mothers and fathers in need or ensuring people battling a terminal illness have good palliative care. Our challenge is to also communicate to them that they are loved, that their unborn child or their own lives are gifts, no matter the circumstances.

Many of us fought in 2016 to prevent doctor-assisted suicide from becoming legal in Colorado, and one person who helped in that effort was a courageous man named J.J. Hanson. J.J. was a Marine veteran and father of two young children who was working for a real estate investment firm in Florida when he found out he had glioblastoma multiforme brain cancer. His doctors told him that it was a very aggressive cancer that meant he only had four months to live.

Despite his odds, J.J. resolved to fight. His motto was: “Every single day is a gift, and we can’t let that go.” What’s even more remarkable is the fact that J.J. dedicated his time and energy to fighting the legalization of assisted suicide around the country, all while undergoing chemotherapy and other treatments. There was hardly a speaking engagement or trip to testify before a legislature that J.J. turned down. His conviction that life was a gift propelled him to defend that gift however he could. As pro-life people, we need to have that same conviction.

Just about two weeks ago, on December 30th, J.J. was called home to the Father – three years beyond what doctors told him to expect. St. Anthony of Padua church in upstate New York, where his funeral was held, was filled with people who paid tribute to how J.J. inspired them to embrace every moment of life, no matter its difficulties as a gift, not something to be thrown away.

All of us are called to embrace life as J.J. did, and in doing so we will help recover the culture of life that is being neglected or forgotten as people cast God and truth aside.

I have said that life is a gift, and while that is true, it’s more than that. Life is also sacred. Life is sacred because it comes from God, the God who is love and who has loved us first. Our lives are also sacred because our beings are made in God’s image and likeness.

We are called to participate in the love of God and to see that every human being, from the moment of conception until natural death, is invited into relationship with God. We are called to ensure that life is set aside for God, that it is honored and recognized as sacred.

The struggle for so many today is that they do not even believe in a god; their only god is themselves. They truly do not believe in the God who is love. And because of this limited worldview, a person’s life can lose its value if their “quality of life” declines.

In the words of Pope Francis to participants in the 2013 Day for Life, “All life has inestimable value even the weakest and most vulnerable, the sick, the old, the unborn and the poor, are masterpieces of God’s creation, made in his own image, destined to live forever, and deserving of the utmost reverence and respect.”

When Jesus speaks about the Judgement of the Nations in Matthew 25, he tells us that life is always sacred by saying that when we love the weak and vulnerable, we are loving him.

The more that we can love the sacred gift of life and celebrate it with joy, the more we will contribute to building a true culture of life in the U.S.

A wonderful example of concretely loving the sacred gift of life is a story I recently heard about a 15-year-old Colorado teenager named Missy, who showed up with her parents at an abortion clinic in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Missy was a sophomore in high school and was in her second trimester of pregnancy. As they approached the clinic, some pro-life volunteers who were parked nearby in a mobile crisis pregnancy van saw them and invited them inside. The volunteers learned that Missy wanted to complete high school and that this desire was pushing her to consider an abortion. One of the volunteers told Missy about how she was faced with the same choice as a teen and chose to keep her child. “It wasn’t easy, but it was amazing,” she reassured Missy.

Missy also worried about the father of the child not being around, to which her dad responded by taking her hand and saying, “I’ll be that man in your child’s life.”

This kind of accompaniment and willingness to heroically support the gift of life is vitally important to forming a culture that welcomes the unborn, the elderly, the disabled and the dying as a gift.

Building a culture of life begins by first receiving the love of the Father, who loves each of us as his sons and daughters. He never abandons us, even though we might abandon him or reject his love.

A culture of life grows when we share his love with others, helping them to embrace life as a gift and a joy, rather than a burden.

Life is a gift, it is sacred and our celebration of the joy of life helps build a culture of life.

I encourage you to be those who are unafraid to give witness to life. Be not afraid to give witness to life. Even though people might ridicule you, yell at you, or reject you, know that Jesus experienced it all so that you might have life, and life abundantly.

May God bless you and help you celebrate life in 2018!