Ways to give to Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal

Denver Catholic Staff

Donating to the annual Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal has a great impact on the wider Church’s reach in northern Colorado. It not only funds various crucial ministries that carry out the general operations of the archdiocese, such as the Offices of Catholic Schools, Evangelization and Family Life Ministries, and Child and Youth Protection, it also helps to fund the many outreach ministries we have here in Denver, such as Catholic Charities, Centro San Juan Diego and much more.

Thankfully, giving to Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal has never been easier. Here are all the ways you can consider giving a gift during this year’s campaign.

Recurring Monthly Gift

This is the easiest and most convenient way to give. Why not integrate your gift to the Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal into your monthly budget? Setting it up online takes less than five minutes, and the automatic withdrawals each month ensure that you don’t have to worry about it anymore – and that those souls the Church serves can benefit directly from your gift each month.

Pledge

Break up your gift to the Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal into several payments by making a pledge. You can pledge whatever amount you’d like and split it into up to eight monthly payments.

One-Time Gift

If it’s more convenient to give a one-time gift, that option is available as well. Give any amount you’d like online, through an envelope given out at your parish or included with the Denver Catholic, or by phone.

Ministries that benefit from Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal

Remember, your gift will directly fund nearly 40 ministries that help to carry out the mission of the Church in northern Colorado and will impact countless lives. Here are just a few of the ministries your gift helps to fund and some of the work they do.

Catholic Charities

Catholic Charities of Denver is the archdiocese’s “charitable arm,” which seeks to extend the healing ministry of Jesus by helping the poor and those in need. Included under Catholic Charities’ umbrella is Samaritan House, the Respect Life Office, Marisol Health, the Gabriel House Project, Archdiocesan affordable housing and much, much more.

Seminaries

The St. John Vianney and Redemptoris Mater Seminaries of the Archdiocese of Denver are nationally-recognized for their exceptional academic and spiritual formation. Currently, 128 seminarians would benefit from this much-needed support, which helps provide funding for academic programs, food and housing, seminarian health insurance and more.

Centro San Juan Diego
A nationally-recognized organization that provides services to members of the Spanish-speaking community in the Archdiocese of Denver, Centro San Juan Diego helps form tomorrow’s Hispanic leaders. In partnership with the Office of Hispanic Ministries of the archdiocese, it hosts numerous faith-based courses and programs.

Annunciation Heights
Annunciation Heights is the archdiocese’s new Catholic youth and family camp and retreat center located just south of Estes Park. Displaying the beauty of God’s creation, Annunciation Heights is a place where people can “withdraw from a hectic and busy culture and come to know and experience a true friendship with Jesus.”

Other Frequently Asked Questions

Why should I donate to the Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal?

As followers of Christ who embodied perfect charity, we are called to support the charitable outreach efforts of our Archdiocesan Church. Much like you are asked to support the pastoral programs of your parish, you are also called to provide for the needs of the wider Church of northern Colorado.

How is the Archdiocese of Denver addressing the current Church crisis?

The Archdiocese of Denver is committed to full transparency and change in the Church. In 2018, the website promise.archden.org was created to educate the faithful on the archdiocese’s handling, prevention, and response policies regarding the crisis. Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila also committed to have an independent review of all priest files related to the sexual abuse of minors. Be assured that 100% of your Appeal gift will support ministry operations and that no Appeal funds were, are, or will ever be used for legal expenses or settlements. Donate to the Appeal with confidence knowing that your gift will be prudently invested in programs that evangelize the faith and serve others.

I donate to the Appeal every year, so why am I asked to increase my gift?

There are many ministries that face increased demands for their services every year. For example, the number of men, women, and children living on the streets continues to rise, the need to make lifelong disciples for Christ through catechesis instruction has never been more compelling, and the financial outlay associated with the education of today’s seminarians grows every year. Your additional sacrifice will help offset the increase in costs.

How much does it cost to conduct the Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal?

The total operating costs associated with last year’s Appeal were only 3.7%. As a result, more than 96 cents of every dollar received was distributed to Catholic ministries.

To donate to Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal, visit archden.org/givenow

COMING UP: Despite no Masses, you won’t believe what parishes are doing

Sign up for a digital subscription to Denver Catholic!

Despite no Masses, you won’t believe what parishes are doing

Livestreamed Masses, drive-through confession and more are sustaining the faithful during quarantine

Aaron Lambert

Nothing like creativity and some humor to make a tough situation a little easier to endure.

“It took generations, but they have succeeded where the rest of us have failed. Children, of all ages throughout the world, have successfully given up school for Lent,” St. John the Baptist Parish in Longmont posted on its Facebook page April 1. Quite a few “Haha” reactions ensued.

The post, of course, refers to the fact that because of the coronavirus pandemic, students are not attending classes in-person and are instead learning from home. This homebound engagement is true for pretty much every other public institution, including Catholic churches. Parishes across the Archdiocese of Denver are having to adapt to a temporary reality where Masses are empty.

Thankfully, that aforementioned creativity, strong communities and a little help from the internet are making it possible for parishes to still serve the faithful in plenty of ways. For many parishes, this means something as simple as livestreaming Masses for the faithful to participate in from home.

While it’s impossible to replace being physically present in the Mass, many seem appreciative and grateful for the opportunity to still engage with the sacred liturgy from afar.

“So grateful to have a Parish Staff that has responded to the current situation and found ways to continue offering sacraments and ministry,” wrote Jodee Hinton on Our Lady of the Valley’s Facebook page. “It was very special and much needed for my family to watch Mass today. My kids loved being able to see what actually happens on the altar.”

“Thank you Father, miss you and sharing Christ with you in person, but we will be with you soon with the help of Jesus Christ. Stay strong and safe,” wrote Judith Ann Aerne on Holy Cross in Thornton’s Facebook page.

Parishioners in their cars line up in the parking lot of Queen of Peace Parish in Aurora to have their confessions heard. Parishes are finding creative ways to offer the sacraments to the faithful while stay-at-home and social distancing orders are in place. (Photo provided by Queen of Peace)

Other parishes are also finding ways to continue providing other sacraments to the faithful. Queen of Peace Parish in Aurora, for example, has launched drive-through confessions on Saturdays to ensure people still have the chance to receive to the Sacrament of Reconciliation, and they’re not the only parish to do so. It’s just one of the ways that they’re able to stay connected to their parishioners while their doors are closed.

“Since they can no longer gather here, we’ve tried to go to them,” said Queen of Peace pastor Father Felix Medina. “We’ve stayed busy. We livestream at least three liturgies a day: Morning Prayer and Adoration in the morning, English Mass at noon and Spanish Mass in the evening.

“I think it’s important for people to know that the Church is still open and it’s more present than ever before, that we will not be silenced, that we won’t stop reaching out to people now,” Father Medina said.

And by reaching out, Father Medina doesn’t mean that figuratively. Queen of Peace and other parishes such as Assumption in Welby and St. John the Baptist in Longmont have been calling their parishioners one-by-one to check in on them and see if they can help with anything.

“We’re essentially asking three basic questions: one, how are you doing; two, do you need anything; and three, can we pray with you?” Father Daniel Ciucci of St. John the Baptist said in an interview with Fox 31.

Volunteers at St. John the Baptist make phone calls to check in on parishioners. Outreach from parishes has taken on a whole new meaning during the coronavirus outbreak, and they’re finding ways to rise to the occasion. (Photo provided by St. John the Baptist)

“As priests, we’ve maintained a life of prayer, but we’ve also been calling our parishioners,” Father Medina said. “We each try to call 50 or 100 a day. They’re very happy to hear us checking in on how they’re doing and how their family’s doing and whether they need anything – especially because we know some of them are lonely and are having a hard time.”

Of course, there’s a whole lot more that parishes do besides offer Mass, and they’re finding ways to keep those things going too. Nativity of Our Lord in Broomfield is offering assistance to parishioners who need it, whether it be delivering groceries or seeing a priest; Risen Christ in Denver is continuing its partnership with Food Bank of the Rockies and doing drive-up food distribution; youth ministers across the archdiocese are doing virtual youth group nights via Zoom. And that’s just scratching the surface.

The parishes of the Archdiocese of Denver will continue to find innovative and creative ways to serve the faithful through all of this. However, they need the vital support of their communities to do so. Many parishes have online giving portals set up through their own website, but you can also visit passthebasket.org to give to any parish in the Archdiocese of Denver.

Vladimir Mauricio-Perez contributed to this report.