Ways to give to Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal

Denver Catholic Staff

Donating to the annual Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal has a great impact on the wider Church’s reach in northern Colorado. It not only funds various crucial ministries that carry out the general operations of the archdiocese, such as the Offices of Catholic Schools, Evangelization and Family Life Ministries, and Child and Youth Protection, it also helps to fund the many outreach ministries we have here in Denver, such as Catholic Charities, Centro San Juan Diego and much more.

Thankfully, giving to Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal has never been easier. Here are all the ways you can consider giving a gift during this year’s campaign.

Recurring Monthly Gift

This is the easiest and most convenient way to give. Why not integrate your gift to the Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal into your monthly budget? Setting it up online takes less than five minutes, and the automatic withdrawals each month ensure that you don’t have to worry about it anymore – and that those souls the Church serves can benefit directly from your gift each month.

Pledge

Break up your gift to the Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal into several payments by making a pledge. You can pledge whatever amount you’d like and split it into up to eight monthly payments.

One-Time Gift

If it’s more convenient to give a one-time gift, that option is available as well. Give any amount you’d like online, through an envelope given out at your parish or included with the Denver Catholic, or by phone.

Ministries that benefit from Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal

Remember, your gift will directly fund nearly 40 ministries that help to carry out the mission of the Church in northern Colorado and will impact countless lives. Here are just a few of the ministries your gift helps to fund and some of the work they do.

Catholic Charities

Catholic Charities of Denver is the archdiocese’s “charitable arm,” which seeks to extend the healing ministry of Jesus by helping the poor and those in need. Included under Catholic Charities’ umbrella is Samaritan House, the Respect Life Office, Marisol Health, the Gabriel House Project, Archdiocesan affordable housing and much, much more.

Seminaries

The St. John Vianney and Redemptoris Mater Seminaries of the Archdiocese of Denver are nationally-recognized for their exceptional academic and spiritual formation. Currently, 128 seminarians would benefit from this much-needed support, which helps provide funding for academic programs, food and housing, seminarian health insurance and more.

Centro San Juan Diego
A nationally-recognized organization that provides services to members of the Spanish-speaking community in the Archdiocese of Denver, Centro San Juan Diego helps form tomorrow’s Hispanic leaders. In partnership with the Office of Hispanic Ministries of the archdiocese, it hosts numerous faith-based courses and programs.

Annunciation Heights
Annunciation Heights is the archdiocese’s new Catholic youth and family camp and retreat center located just south of Estes Park. Displaying the beauty of God’s creation, Annunciation Heights is a place where people can “withdraw from a hectic and busy culture and come to know and experience a true friendship with Jesus.”

Other Frequently Asked Questions

Why should I donate to the Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal?

As followers of Christ who embodied perfect charity, we are called to support the charitable outreach efforts of our Archdiocesan Church. Much like you are asked to support the pastoral programs of your parish, you are also called to provide for the needs of the wider Church of northern Colorado.

How is the Archdiocese of Denver addressing the current Church crisis?

The Archdiocese of Denver is committed to full transparency and change in the Church. In 2018, the website promise.archden.org was created to educate the faithful on the archdiocese’s handling, prevention, and response policies regarding the crisis. Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila also committed to have an independent review of all priest files related to the sexual abuse of minors. Be assured that 100% of your Appeal gift will support ministry operations and that no Appeal funds were, are, or will ever be used for legal expenses or settlements. Donate to the Appeal with confidence knowing that your gift will be prudently invested in programs that evangelize the faith and serve others.

I donate to the Appeal every year, so why am I asked to increase my gift?

There are many ministries that face increased demands for their services every year. For example, the number of men, women, and children living on the streets continues to rise, the need to make lifelong disciples for Christ through catechesis instruction has never been more compelling, and the financial outlay associated with the education of today’s seminarians grows every year. Your additional sacrifice will help offset the increase in costs.

How much does it cost to conduct the Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal?

The total operating costs associated with last year’s Appeal were only 3.7%. As a result, more than 96 cents of every dollar received was distributed to Catholic ministries.

To donate to Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal, visit archden.org/givenow

COMING UP: A time to reflect on death

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November is a month when the Church asks us to pray for the dead. After celebrating those in heaven on Nov. 1, we pray for all the faithful departed who await heaven while undergoing purgation on Nov. 2, All Souls Day. The Church encourages us to pray for the dead by granting special indulgences in November to assist the souls in purgatory. A plenary (or full) indulgence can be received November 1-8 and then a partial indulgence the rest of the month when we “devoutly visit a cemetery and at least mentally pray for the dead” or “devoutly recite lauds or vespers from the Office of the Dead or the prayer Requiem aeternam”: “Eternal rest grant unto him/her (them), O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon him/her/them. May he/she/they rest in peace. Amen.”

November, therefore, provides an opportunity to reflect upon death. Even the readings at the end of the liturgical year and the beginning of Advent point us to the coming judgment and end of the world. We may not relish contemplating death but doing so constitutes an essential element of a life well lived, realizing that our life on earth will decide how we spend eternity. Socrates described philosophy as a preparation for death and the same has been made for monasticism.  “Remember to keep death before your eyes daily,” the great Patriarch of monks, St. Benedict, directed in his Rule (ch. 4). A French writer, Nicholas Diat, put this maxim to the test in his new book, A Time to Die: Monks on the Threshold of Eternal Life (Ignatius, 2019). Diat, known for his three interview books with Cardinal Robert Sarah, visited eight monasteries in France — Norbertines, Benedictines, Cistercians, and Carthusians — to talk to the monks about their experience of death.

He describes why he wrote the book: “The West has worked hard to bury death more deeply in the vaults of its history. Today, the liturgy of death no longer exists. Yet fear and anxiety have never been as strong. Men no longer know how to die. In this desolate world, I had the idea to take the path of the great monasteries in order to discover what the monks might have to teach us about death. Behind cloister walls, they pass their existence in prayer and reflection of the last things. I thought their testimonies could help people understand suffering, sickness, pain, and the final moments of life. They have known complicated deaths, quick deaths, simple deaths. They have confronted death more often, and more intimately, than most who live outside monastery walls” (13).

I found that Diat achieved his objective. Although the monks live very different lives, they still face similar human struggles, sometimes magnified by lack of distractions, including the dominance of technology in sickness and the last stages of life. The Benedictine Monastery of En-Calcat experienced many difficult deaths and the superior, Dom David, related how sedation can make it hard to die: “We no longer feel life. We no longer feel humanity. We no longer feel God approaching” (55). When death approaches more naturally (or should we say supernaturally), the monks can die the “most beautiful death.” Such was the death of Father Henri Rousselot, who died at 96: “His face in death was magnificent. He was supernaturally radiant. The monks had the impression that his features had been drawn by God. Everyone who entered this room was struck by his beauty. Each found the child that Father Henri had always been” (72).

Some monasteries experienced difficult deaths — young monks whose lives were cut short by cancer, or, in the case of the canon Brother Vincent, multiple sclerosis, sudden deaths, even in chapel, or cases of dementia or mental illness. It did seem, however, in my own assessment, that the more a monastery was withdrawn from the world and its cares the more peaceful the deaths of its monks. This was true especially of the Grand Chartreuse (see the film Into Great Silence), where the monks live like hermits in the silent seclusion of prayer. Here the monks, already anticipating heaven, seem to die miraculously by slipping away peacefully. “The beauty of Carthusian deaths, sweet and simple, seems to bear witness to the fact that the spiritual combat of the sons of Bruno is so powerful that, in the final hour, fears are abolished. In the last moments, the peace that dwells in them is so profound that the majority of them are not afraid to die alone. They have spent their lives in the silence of an austere cell that sees them leave this earth” (165).

The book does not treat simply the experience of monks, but a central question for us all: “No one knows how he will live his death. Will we be courageous, fearful, happy? Will we be cowards or heroes?” (114). It’s time to start preparing now!