Ways to give to Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal

Denver Catholic Staff

Donating to the annual Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal has a great impact on the wider Church’s reach in northern Colorado. It not only funds various crucial ministries that carry out the general operations of the archdiocese, such as the Offices of Catholic Schools, Evangelization and Family Life Ministries, and Child and Youth Protection, it also helps to fund the many outreach ministries we have here in Denver, such as Catholic Charities, Centro San Juan Diego and much more.

Thankfully, giving to Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal has never been easier. Here are all the ways you can consider giving a gift during this year’s campaign.

Recurring Monthly Gift

This is the easiest and most convenient way to give. Why not integrate your gift to the Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal into your monthly budget? Setting it up online takes less than five minutes, and the automatic withdrawals each month ensure that you don’t have to worry about it anymore – and that those souls the Church serves can benefit directly from your gift each month.

Pledge

Break up your gift to the Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal into several payments by making a pledge. You can pledge whatever amount you’d like and split it into up to eight monthly payments.

One-Time Gift

If it’s more convenient to give a one-time gift, that option is available as well. Give any amount you’d like online, through an envelope given out at your parish or included with the Denver Catholic, or by phone.

Ministries that benefit from Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal

Remember, your gift will directly fund nearly 40 ministries that help to carry out the mission of the Church in northern Colorado and will impact countless lives. Here are just a few of the ministries your gift helps to fund and some of the work they do.

Catholic Charities

Catholic Charities of Denver is the archdiocese’s “charitable arm,” which seeks to extend the healing ministry of Jesus by helping the poor and those in need. Included under Catholic Charities’ umbrella is Samaritan House, the Respect Life Office, Marisol Health, the Gabriel House Project, Archdiocesan affordable housing and much, much more.

Seminaries

The St. John Vianney and Redemptoris Mater Seminaries of the Archdiocese of Denver are nationally-recognized for their exceptional academic and spiritual formation. Currently, 128 seminarians would benefit from this much-needed support, which helps provide funding for academic programs, food and housing, seminarian health insurance and more.

Centro San Juan Diego
A nationally-recognized organization that provides services to members of the Spanish-speaking community in the Archdiocese of Denver, Centro San Juan Diego helps form tomorrow’s Hispanic leaders. In partnership with the Office of Hispanic Ministries of the archdiocese, it hosts numerous faith-based courses and programs.

Annunciation Heights
Annunciation Heights is the archdiocese’s new Catholic youth and family camp and retreat center located just south of Estes Park. Displaying the beauty of God’s creation, Annunciation Heights is a place where people can “withdraw from a hectic and busy culture and come to know and experience a true friendship with Jesus.”

Other Frequently Asked Questions

Why should I donate to the Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal?

As followers of Christ who embodied perfect charity, we are called to support the charitable outreach efforts of our Archdiocesan Church. Much like you are asked to support the pastoral programs of your parish, you are also called to provide for the needs of the wider Church of northern Colorado.

How is the Archdiocese of Denver addressing the current Church crisis?

The Archdiocese of Denver is committed to full transparency and change in the Church. In 2018, the website promise.archden.org was created to educate the faithful on the archdiocese’s handling, prevention, and response policies regarding the crisis. Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila also committed to have an independent review of all priest files related to the sexual abuse of minors. Be assured that 100% of your Appeal gift will support ministry operations and that no Appeal funds were, are, or will ever be used for legal expenses or settlements. Donate to the Appeal with confidence knowing that your gift will be prudently invested in programs that evangelize the faith and serve others.

I donate to the Appeal every year, so why am I asked to increase my gift?

There are many ministries that face increased demands for their services every year. For example, the number of men, women, and children living on the streets continues to rise, the need to make lifelong disciples for Christ through catechesis instruction has never been more compelling, and the financial outlay associated with the education of today’s seminarians grows every year. Your additional sacrifice will help offset the increase in costs.

How much does it cost to conduct the Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal?

The total operating costs associated with last year’s Appeal were only 3.7%. As a result, more than 96 cents of every dollar received was distributed to Catholic ministries.

To donate to Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal, visit archden.org/givenow

COMING UP: St. Benedict’s wisdom for our times 

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“Let us get up then, at last, for the Scriptures rouse us,” the Rule of St. Benedict urges us. “Let us open our eyes to the light … and our ears to the voice from heaven that every day calls out. … ‘If you hear his voice today, do not harden your hearts’” (Ps 95:8). On July 11 the Church observes the memorial of St. Benedict, and his words from 1,500 years ago seem perfectly fitting for our challenging and changing times.

The Rule of St. Benedict was written some time around 530, a time when the Roman Empire had collapsed and Christianity’s existence in Europe was threatened. Given our current cultural situation and its parallels with his time, I believe we can find fruit in St. Benedict’s teachings.

Saint Benedict grew up surrounded by a culture that was morally corrupt but with the grace of God lived a virtuous life. After spending some time in Rome for studies, he fled its moral decadence to pursue a more solitary life. St. Benedict lived the life of a hermit for several years before he eventually founded several monasteries, which became centers of prayer, manual labor and learning.

St. Benedict begins his rule by urging the monks to “Listen carefully to the master’s instructions and attend to them with the ear of your heart” (Rule, Prologue 1). For us, this means establishing a daily time to listen to the Lord, both in reading the Scriptures and in conversational prayer and meditation.

Our sure foundation during these trying times should be God’s will for each of us, not the constantly changing messages that bombard us in the news or on social media. For some, every online trend has become a form of gospel that must be adhered to with religious conviction. But the faith handed down to us from the Apostles is the only true Gospel, and only it can save souls. Although the times and technology were different, St. Benedict understood the importance of listening to “the master’s instructions.”

In his book, The Holy Spirit in the Life of Jesus, the preacher of the Papal Household, Father Raniero Cantalamessa, addresses the need for priests to arm themselves for battle “with the world rulers of this present darkness” (cf. Jn 10:12). At the heart of his reflection is the insight that “Jesus freed himself from Satan by an act of total obedience to the Father’s will, once and for all handing over his free will to him, so that he could truly say, ‘My food is to do the will of the one who sent me’” (Jn 4:34, The Holy Spirit in the Life of Jesus, p. 36).

The question we must ask ourselves is, “Do I put the Father’s will first in my life in every decision I make and in all that I say and do?” If we place the Father’s will at the center of our lives and truly listen to him with “the ears of our hearts” as St. Benedict taught, we will be prepared for whatever happens and always give witness to the love of God and others. We live in a world that has removed God from culture. History, both salvation history and world history, shows clearly what happens when this occurs. When God is removed, something else becomes “god.” Societies decline and eventually fall and disappear unless they return to the true God and become cultures that promote a life of holiness and virtue.

There is at least one additional lesson from St. Benedict’s rule that is applicable in these times of societal disunity and division. The monks and sisters of the Benedictine spiritual family are known for their hospitality. The Rule teaches this virtue in this way: “All guests who present themselves are to be welcomed as Christ, for he himself will say: ‘I was a stranger and you welcomed me’ (Mt 25:35). Proper honor must be shown to all, especially to those who share our faith (Gal 6:10) and to pilgrims” (Rule, #53).

Let us make it our prayer to be able to see others as Christ himself coming to us, even if they are clothed in what St. Mother Teresa called, “the distressing disguise of the poor.” If we continually seek the will of the Father and ask in prayer for our hearts and will to be conformed to his, then we will be able to weather any challenge.