REVIEW: Unplanned and the abortion business

Unplanned comes out on DVD/Blu-Ray on August 13

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Abby Johnson was astounded when in a meeting her supervisor Cheryl told her that her plan consisted in doubling the number of abortions in every clinic. After receiving the award for the best Planned Parenthood employee, Abby had the courage to publicly disagree with her boss’ intentions. She asked her boss if the goal of Planned Parenthood was really to provide contraceptive methods for women in order to avoid the rise in the number of abortions. Abby made it clear that this had been her motivation for joining the organization. Cheryl later rebuked her in private telling her that abortion is what brings Planned Parenthood the greatest profit – just as a burger business benefits more from French fries and fountain drinks than from burgers themselves. “Abortion is for us like soda and French fries,” Cheryl says to her.

Unplanned tells the story of Abby Johnson, who decided to volunteer at Planned Parenthood when she was a college student. It reveals how this young woman, full of dreams to help others, becomes trapped by the arguments she hears – full of apparent goodness. The engaging narrative, with its use of flashbacks and great acting by the main actress Ashely Bratcher, highlights important elements, such as Abby’s strong emotional experience throughout this journey and the internal battle with her own conscience, which seems to call out the gravity of her actions. Perhaps, this is also due to the fact that she knew her parents firmly believed in defending the life of the unborn. Moreover, the production stresses the perseverance of the activists of 40 Days for Life, who continually prayed for the souls of aborted babies and tried to convince the women arriving at Planned Parenthood to choose life.

After being a volunteer, Abby was hired by the organization and later named the director of an abortion clinic in Bryan, TX, becoming the youngest person to hold such position at Planned Parenthood. As director, she would welcome women who arrived at the clinic for abortions and would advise them, telling them not to worry since the fetus in their womb was not yet a human being; it was still too little and wouldn’t feel anything. She would encourage them not to be afraid because nothing bad would happen to them. This, however, was not always the case. Johnson formed part of the organization for eight years and collaborated in nearly 22,000 abortions. However, everything ended when she walked into an abortion room to assist a woman for the first time. When she saw the ultrasound – which expecting mothers are not allowed to see – she saw a baby of 13 weeks fighting for his life.

Unplanned often shows with severity the drama of abortion, the loneliness of many women who arrive at the clinic deceived and afraid to terminate their pregnancy, without fully knowing about the humanity of the being in their womb. It reveals the way in which the abortion industry wants to conceal or reduce the tremendous negative consequences that such an action has on women’s physical, psychological and spiritual wellbeing. It is a story well told, in which Abby, after encountering different circumstances and being surrounded by people who loved her and respected her liberty – yet not without telling her the truth – reconsiders her actions and eventually turns from a professional woman in the abortion business, to a convinced advocate of the unborn.

COMING UP: Church and state partner to carry out corporal works of mercy during pandemic and beyond

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In times of great need and crisis, we find strength in unity and collaboration, and amid the coronavirus pandemic, this truth remains within the Archdiocese of Denver.

For many years, the Archdiocese of Denver and local Colorado government officials have found ways to work together toward common goals and better serve the people of Colorado, which often includes carrying out corporal works of mercy such as feeding the hungry and sheltering the homeless. And through the COVID-19 pandemic, these partnerships continue to be a crucial part of Colorado’s and the Church’s response to those in need.

The City of Denver and the Archdiocese of Denver have a history of partnering to support people in need. During the pandemic, Mayor Michael B. Hancock and his administration have worked with the archdiocese to safeguard the homeless population and extend testing for COVID-19 to communities at higher risk of struggling with the virus.

“These types of true collaborative relationships really make the difference because you can call on your partners [and] you have established relationships that are built on trust and built on true engagement and true focus on a mutually agreed upon mission,” Mayor Hancock told the Denver Catholic. “Catholic Charities and the archdiocese have been just tremendous partners over the years with us.”

Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila of Denver told the Denver Catholic that “the Catholic Church is motivated to care for the poor and needy by Christ’s commandment to love one another as he loved us.

“The coronavirus pandemic,” he added, “has highlighted this important work and underscored the essential role the Catholic Church plays in fostering a society that upholds the God-given dignity of every person.

“It has been a blessing to be able to work with the City of Denver over many years to serve these vulnerable populations.”

Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila and the Archdiocese of Denver have partnered with Mayor Michael Hancock and the City of Denver in the past to better serve people in need, and they’ve continued those collaborative efforts through the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo by Catholic Charities)

Recently, on July 10 and July 23, Mayor Hancock and the City of Denver hosted events in partnership with Ascension Catholic Parish in Montbello to provide testing for COVID-19 and a mobile food pantry to the local community.

“We have been looking for opportunities to be in the communities, to do the testing, to meet people where they are. And we recognize that Latinos and African-Americans in particular have been most vulnerable to this virus,” Mayor Hancock said. “We needed to really just make sure we took the opportunities for testing to those communities.”

Then, on Aug. 6, Ascension hosted another event in collaboration with the City of Denver where the mayor’s office gave away free backpacks with school supplies, healthy food baskets, baby products, feminine hygiene products and more.

“I am very thankful for Mayor Hancock’s collaboration to help the people of Montbello,” said Father Dan Norick, pastor of Ascension Parish. “I also thank God for the people in Montbello who are caring for each other in these difficult times. May Jesus be praised!”

Mayor Hancock said that hosting these events at Ascension Parish made sense because of the established relationship the City of Denver and the Archdiocese of Denver have developed over the years.

“When you’re looking for who you partner with during these opportunities, you turn to who’s most familiar with you and who you’ve had a trusting collaboration with,” he said. “And it just so happens the archdiocese and the parish there have been the ones that we’ve worked with over the years. So it was very natural. It’s a place where people are familiar and a place they trust.”

It’s not only during the pandemic that this partnership has been fruitful, though. A strong partnership between Samaritan House and the city has existed for quite some time, and this relationship has borne much fruit over the years. Samaritan House strives to be more than a just a homeless shelter, providing education, life skills classes and one-on-one support for its residents to empower them to break free from the cycle of poverty and support themselves independently.

In August 2017, the City of Denver and Catholic Charities of Denver cut the ribbon on the first all-women’s shelter in the city. Called Samaritan House Women’s Shelter, it follows Samaritan House’s established model of helping those experiencing hard times find a way out of poverty and ultimately, bring hope to their lives. Each night, it offers 225 beds for women who are in need of immediate shelter.

Back in April, Catholic Charities teamed up with the City of Denver and took the lead on an auxiliary women’s shelter set up at the Denver Coliseum. (Photo by Catholic Charities)

Back in April, in response to the pandemic and out of a need to maintain social distancing protocols to prevent the spread of COVID-19, the City of Denver and Catholic Charities of Denver partnered to set up the Denver Coliseum as a 24/7 auxiliary emergency women’s shelter that’s that was able to accommodate up to 300 women. Catholic Charities staff took the lead at the shelter with full support from the City of Denver. The auxiliary shelter has since returned to the regular women’s shelter facility, but this collaboration between the city and Catholic Charities was crucial as cases of COVID-19 climbed in April.

“When the pandemic hit, Catholic Charities had to find a way to social distance the ladies in its Women’s Emergency Shelter,” said Mike Sinnett, Vice President of Shelters and Community Outreach. “We also had to provide them 24/7 care to honor the governor’s Stay-at-Home order and triage for the virus. Working with the City of Denver staff, we came together as a shelter community and obtained the use of the Denver Coliseum downtown. We were able to better provide social distancing, 24/7 shelter with three meals a day and other amenities, including showers and case management.

“We believe this effort with the city protected our most vulnerable community and helped prevent the spread of the virus. But more importantly, we made it safer for women experiencing homelessness during this pandemic.”

Featured image: Father Dan Norick hands out supplies during a community giveaway event hosted at Ascension Catholic Parish in Montbello in conjunction with the City of Denver. (Photo provided)