The Sistine Chapel comes to Stanley Marketplace

Exhibit gives visitors a chance to see Michelangelo’s masterpiece up close

Colorado residents will have an opportunity to gaze upon Michelangelo’s famous works of art — right in their own backyard.

The Sistine Chapel exhibit, coming to the Hangar at Stanley Marketplace in Aurora, offers visitors an up-close perspective of Michelangelo’s work.

“At its max, the Sistine Chapel’s ceiling reaches heights of over 60 feet,” said Eric Leong, Associate Producer at SEE Global Entertainment. “But at our exhibit, you can examine the artwork from mere inches away in some instances.

“It’s as if you have the same view Michelangelo did when he originally painted it.”

Co-produced by the Hangar and SEE Global Entertainment, the exhibit will run from July 4 until August 13.

Tickets can be purchased online or at the door, and group tickets are also available.

Visitors explore Michelangelo’s work at the Sistine Chapel exhibit in Tacoma, Washington last year. The exhibit will come to the Hangar at Stanley Marketplace from July 4-August 13. Photos by Lisa Money Photography

Bryant Palmer, Chief Storyteller at Stanley Marketplace, explained that exhibits like the Sistine Chapel embody what Stanley hopes to offer Colorado residents.

“Bringing it to Colorado in a way that’s easily accessible fits right in with pretty much everything we’re trying to do at Stanley Marketplace,” he said.

After visiting the Sistine Chapel during college, Palmer was intrigued but felt that “it wasn’t as intimate as I had hoped for,” he said.

“The biggest thing that I’ve learned since then is how little access you have to see the detail in Michelangelo’s work.”

This exhibit changes the game, offering people the unique chance to see the details.

“The breadth of [Michelangelo’s] work and how many different human figures and expressions he put in the Sistine Chapel is just incredible,” said Palmer. “In this exhibition, you’ll be able to see that and study it from just a couple feet away.”

Both Leong and Palmer emphasized how crucial exhibits like this can be in preserving art and other aspects of history.

“With the recent fire at the Notre Dame Cathedral, we were all reminded how precious our most revered works of art truly are and how important it is to preserve and celebrate them,” said Leong.

“Disasters happen,” said Palmer, “so an exhibition like this really preserves that and makes it something that will last forever.”

The exhibit has already had success in several cities around the world, including Munich, Panama City and Shanghai, and visitors “love being able to absorb the details of the artwork at their own pace in a comfortable environment,” said Leong.

Palmer hopes that will also be the case here in Colorado.

“Art is one of the things that gives meaning to the world, and especially a piece of work like this that really does tell in part the story of humanity,” he said. “I think that’s really powerful.”

COMING UP: Q&A: USCCB clarifies intent behind bishops’ Eucharist document

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Last week, the U.S. bishop concluded their annual Spring meeting, during which much about the Church in the U.S was discussed. In particular, the bishops voted to draft a document on the meaning of Eucharistic life in the Church, which was approved by an overwhelming majority.

Since then, speculation about the nature of the document has run rampant, the chief of which is that it was drafted specifically to instigate a policy aimed directly at Catholic politicians and public figures whose outward political expressions and policy enactment do not align with Church teaching.

The USCCB has issued a brief Q&A clarifying the intent of the document, and they have emphasized that “the question of whether or not to deny any individual or groups Holy Communion was not on the ballot.”

“The Eucharist is the source and summit of Christian life,” the USCCB said. “The importance of nurturing an ever
deeper understanding of the beauty and mystery of the Eucharist in our lives is not a new topic for the bishops. The document being drafted is not meant to be disciplinary in nature, nor is it targeted at any one individual or class of persons. It will include a section on the Church’s teaching on the responsibility of every Catholic, including bishops, to live in accordance with the truth, goodness and beauty of the Eucharist we celebrate.”

Below are a few commonly asked questions about last week’s meeting and the document on the Eucharist.

Why are the bishops doing this now?

For some time now, a major concern of the bishops has been the declining belief and understanding of the Eucharist among the Catholic faithful. This was a deep enough concern that the theme of the bishops’ strategic plan for 2021-2024 is Created Anew by the Body and Blood of Christ: Source of Our Healing and Hope. This important document on the Eucharist will serve as a foundation for the multi-year Eucharistic Revival Project, a major national effort to reignite Eucharistic faith in our country. It was clear from the intensity and passion expressed in the individual interventions made by the bishops during last week’s meeting that each bishop deeply loves the Eucharist.

Did the bishops vote to ban politicians from receiving Holy Communion?

No, this was not up for vote or debate. The bishops made no decision about barring anyone from receiving Holy Communion. Each Catholic — regardless of whether they hold public office or not — is called to continual conversion, and the U.S. bishops have repeatedly emphasized the obligation of all Catholics to support human life and dignity and other fundamental principles of Catholic moral and social teaching.

Are the bishops going to issue a national policy on withholding Communion from politicians?

No. There will be no national policy on withholding Communion from politicians. The intent is to present a clear understanding of the Church’s teachings to bring heightened awareness among the faithful of how the Eucharist can transform our lives and bring us closer to our creator and the life he wants for us.

Did the Vatican tell the bishops not to move forward on drafting the document?

No. The Holy See did encourage the bishops to engage in dialogue and broad consultation. Last week’s meeting was the first part of that process. It is important to note that collaboration and consultation among the bishops will be key in the drafting of this document.


Featured photo by Eric Mok on Unsplash