Stand together and walk for the Way of the Cross

Aaron Lambert

There’s never been a better time to stand together as Catholics and Christians.

As we go through the Lenten season and approach Holy Week, many may be wondering how they can make a true difference in the life of the Church and help others come to see that it is truly more than they realize.

Each year on Good Friday, parishes, apostolates and lay movements around the world hold Way of the Cross processions to commemorate the sacrifice of our Lord and to humbly remind us of his suffering for our sake.

This year, why not make the turnouts for these processions greater than ever and in turn, provide a powerful witness for Christ in the public square?

The Way of the Cross procession, or the Via Dolorosa, is a great opportunity to reflect and meditate on the passion of our Lord. It is a visual sign to remind all participants and bystanders of Christ’s suffering, that he gave his life for our sins. Imagine if we gathered in cities across the country for this prayer, all on the same day? Let us humble ourselves and walk in the steps of our Lord together, so that all may see that he is with us.

Join a Way of the Cross

Locally, Denver Catholics will have a number of opportunities to participate in a Way of the Cross procession. The list below will be updated as parishes share information about their Way of the Cross processions with us.

Communion and Liberation Way of the Cross through Downtown Denver (English)

Friday, April 19, 11:45 a.m.
Meet at Monument on Capitol grounds between Broadway and Lincoln near Colfax
Contact kasha24@gmail.com for questions

Way of the Cross for Victims of Abortion

Friday, April 19, 9 a.m.
Planned Parenthood, 7155 E. 38th Ave., Denver
Led by Deacon Greg Frank of St. Mary’s of Littleton

St. Anthony of Padua Way of the Cross (Spanish)

Friday, April 19
10 a.m. Mass; procession at noon
3801 W. Ohio Ave, Denver

Holy Ghost Parish

Friday, April 19
Noon and 6:30 p.m.
Inside Holy Ghost, 1900 California St., Denver

St. Vincent (Basalt)

Friday, April 19, 12 p.m.
Meet at St. Vincent, 250 Midland Ave., Basalt

Queen of Peace Parish

Sunday, April 13 (Palm Sunday), 3 p.m.
13120 E. Kentucky Ave., Aurora

Nativity of Our Lord Parish

Friday, April 19, 1 p.m.
900 W. Midway Blvd., Broomfield

Blessed Sacrament Parish

Friday, April 19
Meet at base of mountain (Wooly Mammoth Park-N-Ride @ 18506-18532 US Highway 40, Golden
CO 80401) at 9 a.m. or at base of Mother Cabrini Shrine (The Stairway of Prayer) at 11 a.m.
Click here for more info

St. John the Baptist Parish

Friday, April 19, 8 a.m.
323 Collyer St., Longmont
Starts at St. John the Baptist, ends at St. Francis of Assisi

Holy Name Parish

Friday, April 19, 6:30 p.m.
3290 W. Milan Ave., Sheridan

Christ the King Parish

Friday, April 19, 3 p.m.
830 Elm St., Denver

Our Lady of Fatima Parish

Friday, April 19, 6:30 a.m.
1985 Miller St., Lakewood
Start in Our Lady of Fatima’s parking lot and walk ten miles up to the top of the Mother Cabrini Shrine.

COMING UP: Denver’s first Catholic classical high school opens under patronage of Our Lady of Victory

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Nearly half a millennium ago, thousands of Catholics heeded Pope Pius V’s call to pray the Rosary requesting Our Lady’s intercession for the deliverance of Europe from Turkish invasion.

In a miraculous triumph, at what came to be known as the “Battle of Lepanto,” the outnumbered Christian “Holy League” overcame the Turkish forces, winning Our Lady of the Rosary a new advocation: Our Lady of Victory.

Today, Denver’s new and first Catholic classical high school has chosen Our Lady of Victory as its patroness, with the mission of developing the whole person and forming students who are holy, well-educated and prepared to engage the present culture and contribute to society.

Our Lady of Victory High School is part of the Chesterton Schools Network, which encourages parent-led Catholic schools across the nation, inspired by the life and work of G.K. Chesterton, who wrote a poem about the victory at Lepanto.

Although the school is not an archdiocesan high school, it has been officially recognized by Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila as a Catholic school. This fall’s inaugural 9th grade class will launch at the St. Louis Parish School building in Denver with nearly 20 students.

“Chesterton’s model of joyful Catholicism draws upon the classical tradition but is very evangelical: It engages the culture with a joyful approach to being Catholic… rather than a reactionary one,” said Dr. R. Jared Staudt, President of the school, Director of Formation at the Archdiocese of Denver and Visiting Associate Professor at the Augustine Institute. “We want to form saints to go out and do great things for the Lord within our culture.”

The classical education approach highlights the trivium (logic, grammar and rhetoric) and the quadrivium (arithmetic, geometry, music and astronomy).

“We emphasize Socratic dialogue as well as the trivium: how to read texts carefully and understand them through grammar, how to think about them in a coherent manner through logic, and then how to express yourself well in writing and speech through rhetoric; but also the quadrivium: How do we understand the logical order and beauty of the universe?” Dr. Staudt explained.

The benefits of this type of education are many, he assured.

“It’s not just a practical output, but about forming strong dispositions of thinking, of being able to evaluate things, being able to form a plan of action for your life that will translate into being successful in the future.

“It’s about becoming the person that God wants us to become… We emphasize the fundamental things that shape who we are, so that, secondarily, we are also good at doing things,” Dr. Staudt said.

Part of what makes this goal possible is the communion between faith and reason. Students begin the school day with daily Mass; read Homer, Plato, St. Thomas Aquinas, Dostoevsky, G.K. Chesterton, etc.; and study the Bible and the Catechism. They participate in a curriculum where history, philosophy, literature and theology are “braided together,” as their website states.

Part of what makes it unique is also its approach to the fine arts and to mathematics and science.

“We emphasize the fine arts because we want the students to be engaged with beauty and wonder… We want to humanize them, to make them more fully alive,” Dr. Staudt said.

“I would say we also approach math and science from that perspective. We take math and science very seriously, but not as something dry and textbook based, but something that is engaging the beauty, the logic, the wonder of the universe, and the fact that we can logically understand [it] because it is itself something that is a creative work of a mind, of God’s mind, and his beauty is impressed within it.”

As part of this approach, the school has implemented in its unique formation a lot of time in the outdoors, beginning the year with a three-day backpacking trip with the students and ending with a whitewater rafting trip.
The school also plans on having retreats throughout the year, attending and hosting fine arts events and providing service opportunities for its students.

“I think that’s truly part of what makes us unique, that we want to develop the whole person: body, mind and soul,” Dr. Staudt explained.

“It’s about becoming the person that God wants us to become… We emphasize the fundamental things that shape who we are, so that, secondarily, we are also good at doing things.”

The seed for the foundations of the school began with the desire of a group of Denver Catholic parents for a holistic, classical formation for their children, also motived by the need for a Catholic high school in the South Denver metro area.

Hoping to open a Catholic classical high school for their children in the future, six dads organized a series of monthly talks titled “The First Educators” at St. Mary Parish in Littleton from September to November 2018 as a first step to help in this direction.

Little did they know that their dream would become reality only a few months later, with the help of Dr. Staudt, the Chesterton Schools Network and the support of other parents around the archdiocese.

With six experienced teachers on board, the mission-driven school is set to begin forming students in the classical tradition.

“We want them to be holy. I would say that is our biggest overarching goal, that we want to form saints in the sense that they are thinking people who are well-educated and well prepared to engage the world and make a contribution in society – but [in a way] that holiness integrates everything else that we do,” Dr. Staudt concluded.

For more information, visit ourladyofvictorydenver.com.