Some fun facts about Black Catholic History Month

Denver Catholic Staff

The Church has designated November as Black Catholic History Month since 1990 when the National Black Clergy Caucus of the United States instigated it.  November seemed appropriate because it holds special days for two prominent African Catholics:  St. Augustine, whose birthday is Nov. 13, and St Martin de Porres, whose feast day is celebrated on November 3.  St. Ignatius of Loyola recognized St. Martin de Porres on the First Sunday of the Month.

St. Monica is best known as the mother of St. Augustine. She was known for her outstanding Christian virtues, particularly the suffering caused by her husband’s adultery, and her prayerful life dedicated to the reformation of her son, who wrote extensively of her pious acts and life with her in his Confessions.

Did you know?

There are five African American Catholics who are being proposed for Sainthood.  They are Pierre Toussaint (New York), Henriette DeLille (New Orleans), Mary Elizabeth Lange (Baltimore), Augustin Tolton (Chicago), and Julia Greeley (Denver).

Other fun facts…

There have been 3 African Popes in the Catholic Church:

  • Pope Gelasius l, who was Pope from 1 March 492 to his death in 496.
  • Pope Miltiades, who was Pope of the Catholic Church from 311 to his death in 314.
  • Pope Victor I was the first Bishop of Rome born in the Roman Province of Africa. The dates of his tenure are uncertain. However, one source states he became Pope in 189 and died in 199.

Number of African American Catholics

There are 3 million African American Catholics in the United States. Of Roman Catholic parishes in the United States, 798 are predominantly African American. Most of those continue to be on the East Coast and in the South. Further west of the Mississippi River, African American Catholics are more likely to be immersed in multicultural parishes as opposed to predominantly African American parishes.

  • About 76% of African American Catholics are in diverse or shared parishes and 24% are in predominately African American parishes.
  • At present there are 15 living African American bishops, of whom 8 remain active.
  • Currently, six U.S. dioceses are headed by African American bishops, including one archdiocese.
  • There are 250 African American priests, 437 deacons, and 75 men of African descent in seminary formation for the priesthood in the United States.
  • There are 400 African American religious sisters and 50 religious brothers.
  • The Black population in the United States is estimated to be just over 36 million people (13% of the total U.S. population).

By the year 2050, the Black population is expected to almost double its present size to 62 million.

COMING UP: Colorado Catholic bishops remember Columbine on 20th anniversary

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Colorado’s bishops have issued a joint statement recognizing the 20th anniversary of the April 20, 1999 shooting at Columbine High School that claimed the lives of 12 students and one teacher. The full statement can be read below.

This week we remember the horrific tragedy that occurred at Columbine High School 20 years ago. In life there are days that will never be forgotten; seared in our minds and
on our hearts forever – for many of us in Colorado that day was April 20, 1999.

As we mark this solemn anniversary with prayer, remembrance and service let us not forget that there is still much work to be done. Violence in our homes, schools and cities is destroying the lives, dignity and hope of our brothers and sisters every day. Together, as people of good
will, we must confront this culture of violence with love, working to rebuild and support family life. We must commit ourselves to working together to encourage a culture of life and peace.

Nothing we do or say will bring back the lives and innocence that were lost 20 years ago. Let us take this moment to remember the gift of the lives of those we lost, and let us, as men and women of faith, take back our communities from the fear and evil that come from violence like we witnessed at Columbine. Our faith in Jesus Christ provides us with the hope and values that
can bring peace, respect and dignity to our homes, hearts and communities.

Our thoughts and prayers are with the Columbine community and all those affected by violence
in our communities.