Samaritan House and Denver Rescue Mission urge ‘no’ vote on Initiative 300

Top shelters in Denver urge real solutions to homelessness

Denver Catholic Staff

Samaritan House joins Denver Rescue Mission in urging a ‘no’ vote on Initiative 300 on the Denver ballot. Instead, civic efforts should focus on providing services to those experiencing homelessness that help them thrive and not simply survive.

“We want people to come off the street so we can provide them with a safe place to sleep, a hot meal and renewed hope at Samaritan House and Samaritan House Women’s Emergency Shelter,” said Mike Sinnett, vice president of Shelters Services for Catholic Charities. “Our shelters offer dignified and safe options for those without a home. We are equipped to continue to provide services for them to not simply survive but to thrive.”

Initiative 300, also called “Right to Survive” by proponents, would propose significant service challenges, risking the safety and well-being of shelter residents, including families and children, as well as staff of Samaritan House, and of Denver Rescue Mission’s Lawrence Street Shelter and Community Center. Samaritan House, at 2301 Lawrence St., and the Denver Rescue Mission work in close proximity.

“At our very core, we want to help the most vulnerable people in our community. That’s what the Mission’s done for the past 127 years and will continue to do for years to come,” Brad Meuli, President and CEO of Denver Rescue Mission, said. “If you live in Denver, please vote ‘No’ on Initiative 300 and wherever you live please help us by volunteering, donating, or simply engaging in conversations with city officials and others in our community to work on the complicated issue of homelessness. I want to see people experiencing homelessness get the help they need, that’s why Denver Rescue Mission and Catholic Charities are here.”

Initiative 300 would overturn Denver’s urban camping ban. During periods of camping outside both shelters, providers saw an increased presence of police addressing illegal activity and sanitary issues. Samaritan House specifically saw a rise in reports from shelter residents about their children’s safety around the premises. The leadership of Samaritan House and Denver Rescue Mission warn that the passage of Initiative 300 would usher in the following risks and difficulties:

  • Increased health risks to men, women and children utilizing the shelters and staff due to unsanitary environments and illegal drug activity
  • Impede front line staffs’ ability to offer outreach to those living on the streets, including possible legal consequences for offering assistance
  • Hurt efforts to provide crucial services to men, women, and children who face the dangers of living on the street

In 2018, Denver Rescue Mission provided more than 907,000 meals and 400,500 nights of shelter. Last year, 686 of its downtown Denver guests chose to enroll in a life-changing Mission program or service—including the New Life Program. One year after graduation, 91 percent of the Mission’s New Life Program graduates maintain their housing.

Catholic Charities of Denver provided 202,730 nights in emergency and transitional shelter, and 992,070 nights in affordable housing in fiscal year 2017-2018. After completing the Samaritan House extended stay program, 92 percent of men and women 96 percent of families were discharged with income. Through its unique continuum of care model, which addresses each family or individual’s unique needs at every age and stage of life, Catholic Charities provides shelter, affordable housing, early childhood education, counseling, emergency services, food and clothing, senior services and more.

The Denver Homeless Leadership Council, a coalition of service providers that includes Catholic Charities and the Denver Rescue Mission, also recently released a statement on March 6, 2019 about Initiative 300, available here.

About Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Denver

Catholic Charities has served the Denver community since 1927 and now serves tens of thousands of people each year throughout northern Colorado in seven ministries: Marisol Services; Early Childhood Education; Shelter Services; Archdiocesan Housing; St. Raphael Counseling; Family, Kinship, and Senior Services; and Community Services. Catholic Charities serves those in need with the help of hundreds of volunteers and through collaboration with Catholic parishes, other churches, local businesses, nonprofit organizations, government agencies, medical facilities and educational institutions. Learn more at ccdenver.org.

About Denver Rescue Mission

Since 1892, Denver Rescue Mission has been meeting the needs of the poor and homeless through emergency services, rehabilitation, transitional programs and community outreach. For more information visit, DenverRescueMission.org.

COMING UP: Five Hispanic-American saints perhaps you didn’t know

Sign up for a digital subscription to Denver Catholic!

The American continent has had its share of saints in the last five centuries. People will find St. Juan Diego, St. Rose of Lima or St. Martin de Porres among the saints who enjoy greater popular devotion. Yet September, named Hispanic Heritage Month, invites a deeper reflection on the lives of lesser-known saints who have deeply impacted different Latin-American countries through their Catholic faith and work, and whose example has the power to impact people anywhere around the world. Here are just a few perhaps you didn’t know.

St. Toribio de Mogrovejo
1538-1606
Peru

Born in Valladolid, Spain, Toribio was a pious young man and an outstanding law student. As a professor, his great reputation reached the ears of King Philip II, who eventually nominated him for the vacant Archdiocese of Lima, Peru, even though Toribio was not even a priest. The Pope accepted the king’s request despite the future saint’s protests. So, before the formal announcement, he was ordained a priest, and a few months later, a bishop. He walked across his archdiocese evangelizing the natives and is said to have baptized nearly half a million people, including St. Rose of Lima and St. Martin de Porres. He learned the local dialects, produced a trilingual catechism, fought for the rights of the natives, and made evangelization a major theme of his episcopacy. Moreover, he worked devotedly for an archdiocesan reform after realizing that diocesan priests were involved in impurities and scandals. He predicted the date and hour of his death and is buried in the cathedral of Lima, Peru.

St. Mariana of Jesus Paredes
1618-1645
Ecuador

St. Mariana was born in Quito, modern-day Ecuador, and not only became the country’s first saint, but was also declared a national heroine by the Republic of Ecuador. As a little girl, Mariana showed a profound love for God and practiced long hours of prayer and mortification. She tried joining a religious order on two occasions, but various circumstances would not permit it. This led Mariana to realize that God was calling her to holiness in the world. She built a room next to her sister’s house and devoted herself to prayer and penance, living miraculously only off the Eucharist. She was known to possess the gifts of counsel and prophecy. In 1645, earthquakes and epidemics broke out in Quito, and she offered her life and sufferings for their end. They stopped after she made her offering. On the day of her death, a lily is said to have bloomed from the blood that was drawn out and poured in a flowerpot, earning her the title of “The Lily of Quito.”

St. Theresa of Los Andes
1900-1920
Chile

St. Theresa of Jesus of Los Andes was Chile’s first saint and the first Discalced Carmelite to be canonized outside of Europe. Born as Juana, the future saint was known to struggle with her temperament as a child. She was proud, selfish and stubborn. She became deeply attracted to God at the age six, and her extraordinary intelligence allowed her to understand the seriousness of receiving First Communion. Juana changed her life and became a completely different person by the age of 10, practicing mortification and deep prayer. At age 14, she decided to become a Discalced Carmelite and received the name of Theresa of Jesus. Deeply in love with Christ, the young and humble religious told her confessor that Jesus told her she would die soon, something she accepted with joy and faith. Shortly thereafter, Theresa contracted typhus and died at the age of 19. Although she was 6 months short of finishing her novitiate, she was able to profess vows “in danger of death.” Around 100,000 pilgrims visit her shrine in Los Andes annually.

St. Laura Montoya
1874-1949
Colombia

After Laura’s father died in war when she was only a child, she was forced to live with different family members in a state of poverty. This reality kept her from receiving formal education during her childhood. What no one expected is that one day she would become Colombia’s first saint. Her aunt enrolled her in a school at the age of 16, so she would become a teacher and make a living for herself. She learned quickly and became a great writer, educator and leader. She was a pious woman and wished to devote herself to the evangelization of the natives. As she prepared to write Pope Pius X for help, she received the pope’s new Encyclical Lacrymabili Statu, on the deplorable condition of Indians in America. Laura saw it as a confirmation from God and founded the Missionaries of the Immaculate Heart and St. Catherine of Siena, working for the evangelization of natives and fighting or their behalf to be seen as children of God.

St. Manuel Morales
1898-1926
Mexico

Manuel was a layman and one of many martyrs from Mexico’s Cristero War in the 1920s. He joined the seminary as a teen but had to abandon this dream in order to support his family financially. He became a baker, married and had three children. This change, however, did not prevent him from bearing witness to the faith publicly. He became the president of the National League for the Defense of Religious Liberty, which was being threatened by the administration of President Plutarco Elías Calles. Morales and two other leaders from the organization were taken prisoners as they discussed how to free a friend priest from imprisonment through legal means. They were beaten, tortured and then killed for not renouncing to their faith. Before the firing squad, the priest begged the soldiers to forgive Morales because he had a family. Morales responded, “I am dying for God, and God will take care of my children.” His last words were, “Long live Christ the King and Our Lady of Guadalupe!”