Religion teacher wants students to open Bible, be surprised

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Some youth in Felicia Charles’ Sunday school class find learning the faith boring. Others tell her they’ve never opened a Bible, she said.

“Some of them are just resistant to Catholic education in general. You’re dealing with that, too,” 24-year-old Charles said of the challenges she faces with her seventh- and eighth-grade catechism class at St. Ignatius Loyola Church.

It’s not that they can’t learn, said Charles, but that youth need help connecting faith and the Bible with their daily lives.

The African-American Youth Bible, New American Bible, Revised Edition.

The African-American Youth Bible, New American Bible, Revised Edition.

She plans to introduce to her class the new African American Catholic Youth Bible, a translation of the New American Bible Revised Edition that includes commentaries, art and study aids to help educate and evangelize youth about Scripture.

Special sections make Mary, Biblical figures and events relatable through art and maps. Throughout the Old and New Testaments are sections that share stories of African Americans who are important figures in the Catholic Church, tips on applying passages to daily life, suggested prayers and the basics of the Catholic faith.

The hope is to make Scripture more accessible to Black Catholic youth, said Mary Leisring, director of the Office of Black Catholic Ministry in the Archdiocese of Denver.

“Some youth are disenfranchised with the Church,” Leisring said. “It’s an attempt to offer pictures, introductions and commentaries which will enable our young people and all people to find personal connections to the stories and events of the Bible.”

Leisring worked with the National Black Catholic Congress and St. Mary’s Press to develop explanations, prayers and background to help bring the Bible to life. She worked on commentaries for the book of Philippians and John.

“Those are my two favorite books in the Bible,” she said because of the books’ teachings about placing God first and asking him for strength.

She wanted to share her own faith with youth to encourage them on their own journey.

“We say that our youth are leaders of tomorrow, but I think our youth are leaders of today,” she said. “If youth are going to really get back into the Church, it’s not something they need to wait for. They need to do it now. If you say youth is in the present, then they can work alongside us and walk our faith journeys together.”

Charles said she found the popular Catholic Youth Bible also published by St. Mary’s Press— which the African American Youth Bible is modeled after, helpful in her own spiritual journey as a youth.

She uses the Bible and teaching aids to help explain tenets of the faith to her students like the Trinity and events like the Passover—just as she once learned.

Mary Leisring, director of the Office of Black Catholic Ministry for the Archdiocese of Denver.

Mary Leisring, director of the Office of Black Catholic Ministry for the Archdiocese of Denver.

“Some of the students have a hard time grasping these,” she said. “Those are hard concepts to explain to them.”

Charles hopes the youth Bible will be something her students—with a variety of ethnic backgrounds—can relate to.

Sometimes the Bible will offer surprises, she said she tells them, with its fascinating and relevant stories: “It’s OK to listen (to Scripture readings) on Sunday but you should read it yourself. There are so many interesting stories in the Bible you’d be surprised what you find.”

 

The African American Catholic Youth Bible
Publisher: Saint Mary’s Press
www.smp.org or 1-800-533-8095

COMING UP: From rare books to online resources, archdiocesan library has long history of service to students

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National Library Week, observed this year from April 4 to April 10, is the perfect occasion to highlight the essential role of libraries and library staff in strengthening our communities – and our very own Cardinal Stafford Library at the Archdiocese of Denver is no exception.  

Since 1932, the library has served as a religious, intellectual, and cultural resource for seminarians and students at St. John Vianney Seminary in Denver.

As the library of the seminary, we are always responsible for the four dimensions of the priestly formation of our seminarians. The library is charged with being responsible to all the divisions of the Seminary: the Lay Division (Catholic Biblical School and Catholic Catechetical School), the Permanent Deacon Formation Division, and the Priestly Formation Division, said Stephen Sweeney, Library Director. 

In addition to being one of the main resources to the seminary, the Cardinal Stafford Library serves the needs of other educational programs in the Archdiocese of Denver, including the St. Francis School for Deacons, the Biblical School, the Catechetical School and the Augustine Institute. While the library is currently closed to the public due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it was previously open to anyone, giving people access to more than 150,000 books, audios, and videos. 

The Cardinal Stafford Library was named after Cardinal J. Francis Stafford, Apostolic Penitentiary at the Vatican and former Archbishop of Denver from 1986 to 1996. He was a dedicated advocate of the library and of Catholic education.

In 1932, the library was established by two seminarians, Maurice Helmann and Barry Wogan. While they were not the first seminarians to conceive the idea of establishing a library, they are considered the founders for undertaking its organization.  

Since its founding, the library has grown and compiled a fine collection of resources on Catholic theology, Church history, biblical studies, liturgy, canon law, religious art, philosophy, and literature. Special collections include over 500 rare books dating back to the early 16th century and many periodicals dating back to the 1800s. The oldest publication in the library is a book on excommunication published in 1510. The Cardinal Stafford Library is also home to various relics and holds bills personally written by some of those saints.  

Over the past few years, the library has undergone a process of beautification through various renovations that include improvements in lighting, flooring, and even furniture restoration. During these difficult times, libraries are doing their best to adapt to our changing world by expanding their digital resources to reach those who don’t have access to them from home. 

The Cardinal Stafford Library provides a community space; we subscribe to about 200 print journals and have access to literally thousands more through online resources available on campus computers, Sweeney added. “I have been the Library Director for almost 11 years. I absolutely love my work, especially participating in the intellectual formation of the faithful from all of the dioceses we serve”.  

For more information on the Cardinal Stafford Library, visit: sjvdenver.edu/library 

Featured photo by Andrew Wright