Q&A: Where faith and politics intersect, Kimberly Hahn

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Faith and politics often lead the list of topics people would rather avoid at social or family gatherings. And yet, it is precisely in the crossroads of these two realities that the Church asks Catholics to give active and faithful witness to Christ. For citizens, one of the opportunities to do so presents itself in the electoral process. But, what does this look like for a Catholic running for office?

Kimberly Hahn, renowned Catholic convert, author, wife, mother and now politician, shared with the Denver Catholic her approach and experience of meddling in politics as a Catholic — ahead of her presentation at the John Paul II Lecture Series in Denver on the intersection between faith and politics Feb. 13.

After retiring from 26 years of homeschooling her children, she was wondering what she would do next. Her husband, Scott, suggested, “Maybe it’s time for politics?” She launched her campaign and has served as Councilwoman-at-Large of Steubenville, Ohio, for nearly four years.

The interview has been edited for conciseness and clarity.

Denver Catholic: How do you approach politics as a Catholic in the political world? 

Kimberly Hahn:  Some people approach politics as saying, “Everything is political.” I would approach politics saying, “Everything is spiritual.” That because I belong to Christ, every element of my life needs to be brought into relationship with him, and because I love him and I want to serve him, I was open to serving the public, as a public servant in politics.

I don’t believe that politicians are saviors, and that’s a problem, when either people who are in politics or the public, believe that. Lots of fair criticism comes at politicians, but one unfair criticism is, “You haven’t solved all the problems.”

DC: What principles guide your approach to political solutions?

KH: First and foremost is the dignity of the human person. I brought this into campaigning by knocking on almost 8,000 doors and we only have about 8,500 in Steubenville. People said, “Don’t waste your time, most of them aren’t registered; and the ones that are would never vote for you.” And I said, “Whether or not they vote for me, I would still represent them, so of course I still care about their circumstances and their concerns.” Bringing the question of whether this is going to further how I communicate the dignity of each person as I approach legislation is important.

The second of the principles is subsidiarity. What families can and should do, they ought to do. The city should only do those things that the family cannot do; the state should only do those things that the city is incapable of doing; and the federal government should only do those things that the state, local government and family are incapable of doing. I think that if we really understood that principle of subsidiarity, we would strengthen families, municipalities, counties, the state and the federal government.

Then, the principle of solidarity — that we’re in this together. It’s not enough for me to simply focus on my marriage and my family. Maybe as a young mother the only thing that I could do politically was to pray, and that is very important. That may be all some people can do in their state of life. But as that state of life changes, there can be new ways in which you are involved in bringing the Lordship of Jesus Christ to bear in your society.

The fourth principle is the common good: What is good for the whole should be good for the parts. So, am I going to be a good steward of the people’s money? Do I take clearly the accountability that I need to give to the people of this city that when I take your money through the legal means of taxation, I’m accountable to you for how we are using that to solve the problems we can solve, that individual families cannot solve?

DC: What difference does faith make when you are involved in politics?

KH: I believe that God wants to give us assistance in solving very practical problems. So, if the gifts of the Holy Spirit include things like wisdom and understanding, counsel and fortitude, I can ask the Holy Spirit to give me those gifts applied to water and sewer. I think that politics is one of those intersections between faith and life, and we want to understand that God is concerned about all the details. We can honor him in the smallest ways.

DC: Some Catholics prefer to treat religion and politics as separate spheres that should never intersect. What would you say in that regard? 

KH: I would challenge whether they take the Lordship of Jesus Christ very seriously, because to be a Catholic is not simply to be baptized, it is to develop as a disciple, and that means that we bring everything under the Lordship of Jesus Christ: our heart, our mind, our soul, our strength, our resources… So, how I vote, how I’m involved in politics, what my views on issues are, needs to reflect the Lordship of Christ.

There are issues on which there is still a lot of conversation and there isn’t “the Catholic way” of approaching them, but the Church has been clear that life is to be protected from conception to natural death, and to support politicians who fundamentally reject life in the womb is not a tenable position for a Catholic.

DC: We have seen Catholics in office be pressured to leave their religious beliefs behind. What room is there for religion in U.S. politics?

KH: I think there is a lack of understanding historically of why we have the Bill of Rights. It was not to say religion has no place in the marketplace of ideas, it was to say that the U.S. government was not going to sanction one religion and force it on the people. The phrase “Separation of Church and State” is not even found in the Constitution. So, I think it’s a complete misapplication and a twisting of religious freedom.

I think we’ve misunderstood what the founders intended, and we need to really rethink this, especially in recognition that atheism itself is its own religion; and so really, aren’t they actually imposing their religion on us? But regardless of whether or not we pursue this legally, individually, we will stand before our Lord and account for how we voted, who we supported, how we spent our funds.

DC: Is there anything else you would like to add? 

KH: I would put it out there and say, “Is God putting it in your heart to run for office, to serve God and to serve the public?” Because I think it is public service, and it is sacrificial. People will not always understand you and will criticize freely, so you have to know clearly who you are and why you think the way you do, what are the principles guarding you; and you need to pray for the grace to not be prideful, so that if you make wrong decisions, you humble yourself and ask for forgiveness. If you bring all of that to bear, it’s a great witness, it really is.

We need more good people to step forward, people with a compass, people understanding the principles of leadership and service. If that’s what’s on their heart, I would say, “Throw your hat in the ring.”

The intersection between faith and politics

Refectory at St. John Vianney Seminary

February 13, 7 p.m.

RSVP: archden.org/lecture

COMING UP: Colorado Catholic bishops remember Columbine on 20th anniversary

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Colorado’s bishops have issued a joint statement recognizing the 20th anniversary of the April 20, 1999 shooting at Columbine High School that claimed the lives of 12 students and one teacher. The full statement can be read below.

This week we remember the horrific tragedy that occurred at Columbine High School 20 years ago. In life there are days that will never be forgotten; seared in our minds and
on our hearts forever – for many of us in Colorado that day was April 20, 1999.

As we mark this solemn anniversary with prayer, remembrance and service let us not forget that there is still much work to be done. Violence in our homes, schools and cities is destroying the lives, dignity and hope of our brothers and sisters every day. Together, as people of good
will, we must confront this culture of violence with love, working to rebuild and support family life. We must commit ourselves to working together to encourage a culture of life and peace.

Nothing we do or say will bring back the lives and innocence that were lost 20 years ago. Let us take this moment to remember the gift of the lives of those we lost, and let us, as men and women of faith, take back our communities from the fear and evil that come from violence like we witnessed at Columbine. Our faith in Jesus Christ provides us with the hope and values that
can bring peace, respect and dignity to our homes, hearts and communities.

Our thoughts and prayers are with the Columbine community and all those affected by violence
in our communities.