Pope to Neocatechumenal Way pilgrims at jubilee: ‘Go!’

At 50-year celebration, Pope Francis urges Neocatechumenal Way to continue evangelizing

On May 5, at the grounds of Tor Vergata University, Pope Francis met with 150,000 members of the Neocatechumenal Way from across the globe to mark the 50th anniversary of the charism in Rome. Among the 7,700 American pilgrims were nearly 300 Way members from the Archdiocese of Denver.

“The occasion is to give thanks to the Lord for helping us to rediscover our baptism through this Christian initiation,” Father Giuseppe Fedele, responsible for the Way in Colorado, told the Denver Catholic as the group waited for the Holy Father’s arrival. “It’s an opportunity for us to sing the Te Deum [hymn of praise to God] for this anniversary. The Lord is helping us to rediscover the beauty of living our faith in the context of community.”

The Way is a parish-based faith formation process centered on Scripture, Eucharist and community. The catechumenate strives to bring Catholics to mature Christian faith. It was founded in 1964 in Madrid by Spanish artist Kiko Arguello, a layman, and arrived to Rome in 1968.

Missionary in spirit and found on every continent, the Way has 1 million members and has helped to open some 125 seminaries, all called Redemptoris Mater, including one in Denver.

At the meeting, Arguello, 79, led songs and drew applause and flag-waving from the multitude as he introduced the faithful from 135 nations, and the cardinals and bishops seated on the stage who accompanied them, to the pontiff.

In addition to addressing the crowd, Pope Francis sent out 34 new missio ad gentes groups (mission to the nations), comprised of a priest and up to five families, to different parts of the world to evangelize as an “itinerant Church.” He also sent 25 veteran communities of Rome on mission to parishes in the outskirts of the city.

“Go. The mission demands that we leave,” Pope Francis exhorted. “[Jesus] says to his disciples, to all his disciples one word only: Go! Go: a powerful call that resonates in every corner of Christian life; a clear invitation always to be outbound, pilgrims in the world in search for the brother who still does not know the joy of God’s love.”

On the day of the pope’s meeting, on Twitter, Denver Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila affirmed the Holy Father’s words and expressed his own gratitude.

“Pope Francis gives thanks for the 50 years of the Neocatechumenal Way and calls them to evangelize — to go out into all the world!” he tweeted. “Blessings on the Way and all of their missionary activity! They are a blessing for ArchDen!”

The Colorado contingent of pilgrims included some 20 Way members from Pueblo, Wyoming and Utah. The pilgrimage included sites in Madrid and Rome important to the history of the Way and of the Church, including the family home of Arguello; the tomb of Way co-founder Carmen Hernandez, a Spanish lay catechist who died in 2016; the first Redemptoris Mater Seminary; the Shrine of Our Lady of the Rosary in Pompeii, patroness of the Way; the Colosseum and Circus Maximus where early Christians were martyred; St. Paul Outside the Walls Basilica, and St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City.

The pilgrims went singing through the streets of the cities they visited spreading Christian joy, and gave missions in prominent squares that included sharing testimonies of sin and brokenness and finding new life in Christ.

Grecia Sanchez, 28, of a Way community at Queen of Peace Church in Aurora, Colo., was among those who shared her testimony.

“Sharing my experience was meant to help youths see that God can do anything. He took me out of the way I was living and the suffering I experienced — and it is possible for God to do that for them. I wanted them to know that anything is possible for God.”

Way members of St. Joan of Arc Parish in Arvada, Colo., Eric Hilz, 47, and his wife Christy, 43, took their four children, ranging in age from 3 years to 7 years, on the pilgrimage.

“Because of the Way, I’ve been blessed with a community, catechists and priests that have been instrumental in supporting me as a husband and father,” Eric Hilz said. “With all this, I needed to celebrate this 50th anniversary celebration of this charism that has been so instrumental in my life.”

Christy Hilz said she, too, went to give thanks and to receive the graces of catechesis she knew would be forthcoming to deepen her relationship with Christ.

“The pilgrimage confirmed for me that God knows me deeply and that he hears me,” she said. “Each day, God blessed me with something special that showed me he was present.

“This pilgrimage brought to light the gift of the family and of the youth and how they are both essential to the evangelization of the world.”

In his closing remarks, Pope Francis urged the Way to continue its mission of formation and evangelization.

“Your charism is a great gift from God for the Church of our time,” he said. “I accompany you and encourage you: go ahead!”

COMING UP: Team Samaritan cyclist goes ‘Everesting’ for the homeless and hungry

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When it comes to the daily sufferings of those who are homeless, there’s nothing like a 29,029-foot bike ride to keep things in perspective.

That’s exactly what Corbin Clement will be doing this Saturday, June 19, with a couple of his riding buddies as they attempt an “Everesting” ride to raise money for the Samaritan House homeless shelter in Denver. Starting at Witter Gulch Road in Evergreen, the three riders will climb Squaw Pass Road to a point in Clear Creek County and ride back down the hill for over eight laps, which amounts to roughly 190 miles in distance and the equivalent of the elevation of Mt. Everest in terms of vertical climbing – hence the name “Everesting.” Their goal is to complete the feat in 20 hours or less.

Oh, and they can’t sleep. It is, indeed, just as crazy as it sounds. Those who aren’t avid cyclists might be wondering, “How in the world do you train for something like this?” 
 
“For training, it’s been just more or less ride as much as possible,” Clement told the Denver Catholic. “The training is structured around endurance, and that’s of course what Everesting is. It’s just a lot of peddling. So, a lot of my training so far has just been trying to ride as much as possible and ride longer high elevation rides.” 

In March, an Irish cyclist set the world record for Everesting when he completed the feat in six hours and 40 minutes. Clement isn’t trying to set a record, but regardless, it’s quite a feat to undertake, even for a seasoned athlete like him, whose pedigree includes snowboarding and rock climbing. 

“Our ride will be the same thing, but it’ll be pretty different,” Clement said. “We don’t have any sort of special bikes or super focused diet or a really regimented plan or a crew that’s very well-instructed on how we’re going to tackle this. I’ve read a couple of things to just kind of make it into a party — have friends come out to support you, get people to join you on certain laps…that’s kind of the approach we’re taking.” 

Clement has already raised $5,200 for Samaritan House, with a current goal of $8,000. This is Clement’s first year riding for Team Samaritan, but his dad, Kevin, has ridden for the team for several years. When his dad offered to give him an extra kit and uniform, Clement accepted, but didn’t want to take it without doing something help the cause. He could’ve simply opted for a nice ride in the countryside, but he chose to do something a bit more challenging.  

Corbin Clement used to experience the challenges that homeless people face on a daily basis when commuting through downtown Denver to work on his bike. This Saturday, he will raise money for Samaritan House homeless shelter by “Everesting,” a 190-mile bike ride that is the equivalent of the elevation of Mt. Everest in terms of vertical climbing. (Photo provided)

“For some reason, the Everesting idea popped into my head,” he explained. “I think it’s one of those things that has a little bit of shock value for people who hear about it. It’s certainly something that’s gained more popularity and visibility in the last couple of years with endurance athletes. I wanted to choose something that would actually be a challenge for myself and something that I’d have to work towards.” 

Clement currently resides in Utah, but he used to live in Denver and commute by bike to work every day. During those rides to his office, which was located near Samaritan House, he would pass many homeless people and have conversations with them. This experience was also a motivating factor for his Everesting attempt for Team Samaritan. 

“It’s very different when you’re on a bike versus in a car because you’re right there,” Clement said. “If you stop at a stoplight and a homeless person is on the corner, whether or not they’re panhandling or something like that, you hear the conversations, or you’ll have a conversation with them. There are things you smell or you hear or you see that you just never would if you were in a car. So, it kind of made sense, too, with the biking aspect. It’s part of my community that I’ve lived and worked in for a very long time.” 

Clement’s Everesting attempt is one event in a series of endurance event’s he’s doing over the summer that culminates with the Leadville 100, a single-day mountain bike race across the Colorado Rockies. In that race, he will be riding to support young adults diagnosed with cancer by raising funds for First Descents.  

Both causes are near to Clement’s heart, and he said that while his Everesting attempt will be a form of “suffering,” it pales in comparison to what the homeless face day in and day out. This is ultimately why he’s riding and raising funds for Team Samaritan. 

“Any time we see a homeless person or people who have to live on the streets,” Clement said, “That is true suffering — true endurance — with no end in sight.” 

To learn more about Corbin’s fundraising efforts or to donate, click here.