Part-timers, world travelers influence mountain parish life

Moira Cullings

As the winter season winds down in Colorado’s mountain towns, Catholic churches deep in the Rockies will look a little different during weekend Masses.

This time period, known by locals as “shoulder season,” is quiet but brief. It slows down life at Catholic parishes and local communities — particularly in two popular Colorado destinations.

Breckenridge, home of one of the most-visited ski resorts in the country, averages around 1.6 million annual visits. Just 136 miles away, Aspen’s year-round population is around 6,600, while its average daily population jumps to more than 20,000.

The Denver Catholic spoke with two women — one from each town — about their experiences as full-time parishioners at churches that receive a steady flow of visitors from all over the world.

From part time to permanent

In 2006, Judy Dunn began spending a month in Aspen, where she frequently attended St. Mary Catholic Church during those visits.

“Then in 2011, I bought a place here in town with the full intention that I was just going to spend the winters here,” said Dunn.

But she was captivated by the St. Mary community and had become deeply involved in what the parish had to offer.

“The winter wasn’t long enough,” said Dunn. “A lot of people will say, ‘Come for the winter, stay for the summer.’

“I came for the winter and stayed for St. Mary’s.”

Dunn became a full-time Aspen resident after becoming more and more invested in the parish she had grown to love.

“I became a lector and went to Bible study,” she said. “As time went on, I got involved with the building committee and fundraising for the parish.”

Dunn eventually became the Director of Aspen Catholic, an organization that brings in speakers from around the country a few times a year for the Aspen community and out-of-town visitors to enjoy.

“I better become a resident,” Dunn thought, “because I’m here all the time.”

And so she did.

Now a full-time parishioner, Dunn sees the beauty of parish life in a town like Aspen.

“I had never been in a place where you do have so many visitors and there are so many second homeowners that really are very engaged and involved in this parish,” she said. “It’s amazing.”

Dunn meets visitors at the church who traveled from South America, Australia, Chicago and New York. She recently met someone at church from Hawaii.

“We’ll have visitors that, while they’re here, will come to daily Mass every morning,” she said. “That’s very special.

“I made friends with a couple from Brazil,” she added. “They were here for two weeks and did not miss a daily Mass. They’d come dressed to go skiing, and then they’d be off and do their thing.

“I think it’s good for our local community to see the devotion and devout Catholics from across the country.”

But Dunn also appreciates the down time during those few months out of the year when things are much quieter.

“As much as I love the busy time, shoulder season is also very nice, very quiet and very peaceful,” she said. “It’s a nice balance.”

Dunn’s faith has not only been impacted by the visitors, but also by her fellow parishioners.

“I think it’s a very warm community,” she said. “There’s a lot of things going on in the parish to give people an opportunity to get involved.”

The beauty of Aspen doesn’t hurt, either.

“When you go up on that mountain and look out, you think, ‘Wow. This is not manmade. This didn’t just happen,’” she said.

“You have to look out at this and feel very spiritual and very blessed to be able to see something like this every day.”

Part-timers fills the pews

It didn’t take long for Suzanne Anderson to feel like she belonged in the Catholic community when she moved to Breckenridge around four years ago.

A fellow full-time parishioner named Barbara made sure she was embraced at St. Mary Catholic Church.

“When I would come into church at St. Mary’s, she would always welcome me,” said Anderson. “Because she was a regular parishioner, she had a big influence on helping me feel at home.”

That hospitality is a staple of the Breckenridge parish, where, during busy seasons, the bulk of those in the pews are from out of town.

“I would say of all the churches I’ve belonged to, this parish is definitely one of the most heartfelt in their love for their Catholic faith and in their appreciation of our priests,” said Anderson.

It’s also the only parish Anderson has belonged to that’s profoundly influenced by visitors.

A few times at Mass, she’s looked around as the priest asks those in the pews, “How many of you are here from out of town? How many of you are visitors?”

The vast majority of those in attendance raise their hands.

After that, the priests “always say thank you for taking time out of your holiday, your weekend, to come to church,” said Anderson.

“It’s a wonderful feeling to attend church on a Saturday evening, and it’s full. And it’s full because of these visitors,” she added. “It makes you feel like Catholic people really care about coming to church.

“They could be on the slopes, they could be skiing, they could be hiking. On a Saturday night at five o’clock, they could be at a restaurant. Instead, they’re here sharing Mass with us,” she said. “I love that.”

Because the full-time parishioners at St. Mary are so few, it makes the community even closer.

“The advantage is you really get to know your little circle of regulars,” said Anderson.

And those who are there full time are eager to be involved in what St. Mary offers, often taking part in the parish’s Bible study, adoration and even daily Mass.

Anderson is inspired by the faith she’s found at the small mountain parish.

“I feel very, very blessed to be part of this parish because of our priests and because of our regulars,” she said. “They’re wonderful people.”

COMING UP: The Sistine Chapel comes to Stanley Marketplace

Sign up for a digital subscription to Denver Catholic!

The Sistine Chapel comes to Stanley Marketplace

Exhibit gives visitors a chance to see Michelangelo’s masterpiece up close

Moira Cullings

Colorado residents will have an opportunity to gaze upon Michelangelo’s famous works of art — right in their own backyard.

The Sistine Chapel exhibit, coming to the Hangar at Stanley Marketplace in Aurora, offers visitors an up-close perspective of Michelangelo’s work.

“At its max, the Sistine Chapel’s ceiling reaches heights of over 60 feet,” said Eric Leong, Associate Producer at SEE Global Entertainment. “But at our exhibit, you can examine the artwork from mere inches away in some instances.

“It’s as if you have the same view Michelangelo did when he originally painted it.”

Co-produced by the Hangar and SEE Global Entertainment, the exhibit will run from July 4 until August 13.

Tickets can be purchased online or at the door, and group tickets are also available.

Visitors explore Michelangelo’s work at the Sistine Chapel exhibit in Tacoma, Washington last year. The exhibit will come to the Hangar at Stanley Marketplace from July 4-August 13. Photos by Lisa Money Photography

Bryant Palmer, Chief Storyteller at Stanley Marketplace, explained that exhibits like the Sistine Chapel embody what Stanley hopes to offer Colorado residents.

“Bringing it to Colorado in a way that’s easily accessible fits right in with pretty much everything we’re trying to do at Stanley Marketplace,” he said.

After visiting the Sistine Chapel during college, Palmer was intrigued but felt that “it wasn’t as intimate as I had hoped for,” he said.

“The biggest thing that I’ve learned since then is how little access you have to see the detail in Michelangelo’s work.”

This exhibit changes the game, offering people the unique chance to see the details.

“The breadth of [Michelangelo’s] work and how many different human figures and expressions he put in the Sistine Chapel is just incredible,” said Palmer. “In this exhibition, you’ll be able to see that and study it from just a couple feet away.”

Both Leong and Palmer emphasized how crucial exhibits like this can be in preserving art and other aspects of history.

“With the recent fire at the Notre Dame Cathedral, we were all reminded how precious our most revered works of art truly are and how important it is to preserve and celebrate them,” said Leong.

“Disasters happen,” said Palmer, “so an exhibition like this really preserves that and makes it something that will last forever.”

The exhibit has already had success in several cities around the world, including Munich, Panama City and Shanghai, and visitors “love being able to absorb the details of the artwork at their own pace in a comfortable environment,” said Leong.

Palmer hopes that will also be the case here in Colorado.

“Art is one of the things that gives meaning to the world, and especially a piece of work like this that really does tell in part the story of humanity,” he said. “I think that’s really powerful.”