Official Appointments: July 1, 2019 (Permanent Diaconate)

Denver Catholic Staff

Here’s a list of all the new permanent diaconate appointments for the Archdiocese of Denver, including the newly ordained deacons.

Newly Ordained Appointments

Deacon Daniel Cook, appointed deacon at St. Mary Parish in Breckenridge and to Migrant Ministry in Edwards, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon Eric Ditch, appointed deacon at Saints Peter & Paul Parish in Wheat Ridge and to the R.I.S.E. Apostolate, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon John Doubrava, appointed deacon at Our Lady of the Plains Parish in Byers and to Marisol Health, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon John Ferraro, appointed deacon at St. Gianna Molla Parish in Denver and to Catholic Charities Women’s Shelter on Smith Road, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon Richard Hamilton, appointed deacon at Our Lady of the Pines Parish in Conifer and to the Shiloh House, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon Thinh Le, appointed deacon at Our Lady of Fatima Parish in Lakewood and to Gabriel House in Jefferson County, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon Timothy McCann, Jr. appointed deacon at Guardian Angels Parish in Mead and to the Legislative Action Team, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon Anthony Misiti III, appointed deacon at Spirit of Christ Parish in Arvada and to Mt. Olivet Mortuary & Cemetery, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon Huan Nguyen, appointed deacon at Nativity of Our Lord Parish in Broomfield and to the Fallen Away Catholics Ministry, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon Thomas Piccone, appointed deacon at Risen Christ Parish in Denver and to the Legislative Action Team, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon Pedro Reyes, Jr. appointed deacon at St. William Parish in Ft. Lupton and to the Catholic Charities Respect Life Team, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon David Simonton, appointed deacon at St. Thomas More Parish in Centennial and to Family Ministry, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon Christopher Tranchetti, appointed deacon at Our Lady of Loreto Parish in Foxfield and to the Veterans’ Program, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon Joseph Vu, appointed deacon at All Saints Parish in Denver and to Gabriel House & Haven House, effective June 22, 2019.

Reappointments

Deacon Glenn Allison, relieved of duties at Our Lady of Fatima in Lakewood and  appointed deacon at Shrine of St. Anne Parish in Arvada, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Richard Antinora, reappointed deacon at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish in Ft. Collins, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Joseph Benjamin, reappointed deacon at St. Joseph Parish in Akron, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Richard Borda, relieved of duties at Shrine of St. Anne Parish in Arvada and appointed deacon at Holy Trinity Parish in Westminster, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Richard Boyd, granted retirement status, effective June 1, 2019.

Deacon George Brown, granted retirement status, effective May 1, 2019.

Deacon Henry Concha, reappointed deacon at Annunciation Parish in Denver, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Robert Cropp, reappointed deacon at St. Thomas More Parish in Centennial, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Peter Hung Phi Dang, reappointed deacon at Queen of Vietnamese Martyrs Parish in Wheat Ridge, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Oscar DelVillar, reappointed deacon at Immaculate Conception Parish in Lafayette, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Ruben Estrada, reappointed deacon at Ascension Parish in Denver, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Michael Fletcher, reappointed deacon at Christ on the Mountain Parish in Lakewood, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Gregory Frank, reappointed deacon at St. Mary Parish in Littleton, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Joseph Gerber, reappointed deacon at St. Joan of Arc Parish in Arvada, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Charles Goldburg, granted faculties in the Archdiocese of Denver and coming from the Diocese of Rockville Centre, NY appointed deacon at Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception in Denver, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Hal Goldwire, relieved of duties at St. Vincent de Paul Parish in Denver and appointed deacon at St. Bernadette Parish in Lakewood, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon William Hastings, reappointed deacon at St. Peter Parish in Greeley, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Martin Hetzel, granted retirement status, effective June 1, 2019.

Deacon Timothy Kenny, relieved of duties at St. Thomas More Parish in Centennial and appointed deacon at Risen Christ Parish in Denver, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Dennis Langdon, reappointed deacon at St. Joseph Parish in Golden, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Kevin Leiner, reappointed deacon at Notre Dame Parish in Denver, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Wilfredo Liwanag, reappointed deacon at St. Michael the Archangel Parish in Aurora, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon David Luksch, reappointed deacon at Sacred Heart of Jesus Parish in Boulder, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Mario Martha-Pro, relieved of duties at St. William Parish in Ft. Lupton and appointed deacon at St. Helena Parish in Ft. Morgan, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon James Parrilli, granted faculties in the Archdiocese of Denver, coming from the Diocese of Palm Beach, FL appointed deacon at Christ the King Parish in Denver, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Anthony Pierson, granted retirement status, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Cesar Perez, relieved of duties at Our Lady of Peace Parish in Greeley and appointed deacon at St. Peter Parish in Greeley, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Mark Salvato, reappointed deacon at Risen Christ Parish in Denver, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Andrew Sanchez, relieved of duties as St. John the XXIII Parish in Ft. Collins appointed deacon at Our Lady of the Valley Parish in Windsor, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Donald Schaefer, reappointed deacon at Holy Name Parish in Denver, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Charles Schultz, reappointed deacon at St. Mark Parish in Westminster, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon William Senger, appointed deacon at Our Lady of Peace in Silverthorne, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Steven Stemper, reappointed deacon at St. Thomas More Parish in Centennial, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon George Thierjung, relieved of duties at Our Lady of the Mountains Parish in Estes Park and appointed deacon at St. Francis of Assisi Parish in Longmont, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Steven Vallero, reappointed deacon at Nativity of Our Lord Parish in Broomfield, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Patrick Whaley, relieved of duties at Good Shepherd Parish and appointed deacon at St. Vincent de Paul Parish in Denver, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Richard Wilson, reappointed deacon at St. Helena Parish in Ft. Morgan, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Paul Zajac, reappointed deacon at St. Anthony of Padua Parish in Denver, effective July 1, 2019.

Featured image by Brandon Young

COMING UP: The priesthood is more than just a job

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In October, the Special Assembly of the Synod of Bishops for the Pan-Amazonian Region will be held at the Vatican. On the agenda: a discussion on the possibility of ordaining married men to the priesthood in that region, due to a particularly dire lack of vocations. The news has reawakened discussion on priestly celibacy in general, and whether the time has come to relax the requirement on a wider level. And so, I figured it was time to revisit the subject here, as well.

To set the tone, I’d like to begin my discussion with a very short quiz:

Q: Why does the Roman Catholic Church require lifelong celibacy for ordained priests?

  1. Because sex is bad, dirty and evil, and our priests should not defile themselves;
  2. Because we don’t want to have to support priests’ families out of collection funds;
  3. None of the above; or
  4. Both of the above.

The correct answer would be C, none of the above.

So why, then? Why on earth would these men have to give up the possibility of marriage and children, just because they want to serve God as priests?

Priestly celibacy is a discipline of the Church, not a doctrine. It could change. The rule has already been relaxed in relation to married Episcopalian priests who convert to Catholicism. In this era of widespread priest shortages, and even wider-spread scandals, should we consider expanding that exemption, and remove the requirement of priestly celibacy entirely? Wouldn’t a married priesthood encourage more men, and perhaps healthier men, to respond to the call of God?

Perhaps. But at what cost?

Discussions about the elimination of priestly celibacy are not new. They’ve been around as long as priestly celibacy itself. One of the periods of particularly spirited discussion on the subject was in the late 1960’s. In response, Pope Paul VI wrote an encyclical entitled Sacerdotalis Caelibatus. In it, he explained the reasons for the Church’s long history of priestly celibacy, and he enumerated three “significances,” or reasons, for the tradition:

Christological: The priesthood isn’t just a job. It is a state of being. It encompasses his entire existence. It places a mark on his soul — a mark that will follow him into eternity. The priest is ordained by a bishop, who was ordained by a bishop, who was ordained by another bishop, in an unbroken chain that goes clear back to the apostles. And through that sacramental ordination, and the power and grace it conveys, the priest stands in persona Christi —  in the person of Christ. He has the power to consecrate the Eucharist — to turn bread and wine into the body and blood of Christ. He can forgive sins.  And so, standing in the person of Christ, the priest seeks to be like him in all things. He imitates Christ’s life, which includes Christ’s celibacy.

But, you say, Christ also had a beard. Does the priest have to imitate that, too? How far do we have to take this whole imitation thing? Well, the question we must ask is: What was integral to Christ’s ministry? Was celibacy integral? What would it look like if Christ had married and had children? He would have had to work to support them. He would have had to provide them a home.  No iterate preaching, moving from town to town. Jesus was not going to be an absentee husband and father. It was the freedom of celibacy that allowed him to give himself totally to the service of the Father and the Father’s children. So yes, I’d say it was integral. The beard, not so much.

Ecclesiological:  This basically means it is about the Church. Our understanding of a priest is not that he’s a single guy, a bachelor. He, like Christ, is in fact “married” to the Church. You’ve heard all that talk about how the Church is the “bride of Christ.” We really believe that. And the priest, standing in persona Christi, likewise becomes the Bridegroom, giving his life for the Church, and especially for the part of the Church he serves. He doesn’t just offer his “workday” to us, the flock.  He offers his life. He serves us as a husband serves his wife. (And we the faithful, as good “wives”, should likewise be going out of our way to love and care for our priests.)  His attention and affections are not divided between his bride, the Church, and an earthly bride and family. He has far greater freedom than a married man — freedom to not only serve his flock, but to pray and meditate and to grow closer to the Christ whom he represents on this earth. Which then prepares him for further service to the flock.

Eschatological: This means it’s about the next life. Remember my last column, about the Poor Clare Sisters who make the radical choice to live this life as if were already eternal life, focusing only on Christ? Well, priests participate in that too. Scripture says that, in Heaven, we will neither marry nor be given in marriage. (Mt 22:30) Priests and consecrated religious foreshadow that here, reminding us that everything that happens in this life is just a prelude to the life to come.

And so, for all of these reasons, I oppose the wholesale elimination of the requirement of priestly celibacy. I realize that we already have exceptions. I know several of those “exceptions,” and I think they are wonderful people and wonderful priests. But I think they would acknowledge the difference between the exception and the rule, and that the loss of priestly celibacy would change our understanding of the character and charism of the priesthood. The priesthood would be increasingly perceived as just another career choice — one to be entered and left at will.

And whatever the priesthood may be, it is definitely not just another job.

Featured image by Josh Applegate on Unsplash