Official Appointments: July 1, 2019 (Permanent Diaconate)

Denver Catholic Staff

Here’s a list of all the new permanent diaconate appointments for the Archdiocese of Denver, including the newly ordained deacons.

Newly Ordained Appointments

Deacon Daniel Cook, appointed deacon at St. Mary Parish in Breckenridge and to Migrant Ministry in Edwards, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon Eric Ditch, appointed deacon at Saints Peter & Paul Parish in Wheat Ridge and to the R.I.S.E. Apostolate, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon John Doubrava, appointed deacon at Our Lady of the Plains Parish in Byers and to Marisol Health, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon John Ferraro, appointed deacon at St. Gianna Molla Parish in Denver and to Catholic Charities Women’s Shelter on Smith Road, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon Richard Hamilton, appointed deacon at Our Lady of the Pines Parish in Conifer and to the Shiloh House, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon Thinh Le, appointed deacon at Our Lady of Fatima Parish in Lakewood and to Gabriel House in Jefferson County, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon Timothy McCann, Jr. appointed deacon at Guardian Angels Parish in Mead and to the Legislative Action Team, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon Anthony Misiti III, appointed deacon at Spirit of Christ Parish in Arvada and to Mt. Olivet Mortuary & Cemetery, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon Huan Nguyen, appointed deacon at Nativity of Our Lord Parish in Broomfield and to the Fallen Away Catholics Ministry, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon Thomas Piccone, appointed deacon at Risen Christ Parish in Denver and to the Legislative Action Team, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon Pedro Reyes, Jr. appointed deacon at St. William Parish in Ft. Lupton and to the Catholic Charities Respect Life Team, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon David Simonton, appointed deacon at St. Thomas More Parish in Centennial and to Family Ministry, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon Christopher Tranchetti, appointed deacon at Our Lady of Loreto Parish in Foxfield and to the Veterans’ Program, effective June 22, 2019.

Deacon Joseph Vu, appointed deacon at All Saints Parish in Denver and to Gabriel House & Haven House, effective June 22, 2019.

Reappointments

Deacon Glenn Allison, relieved of duties at Our Lady of Fatima in Lakewood and  appointed deacon at Shrine of St. Anne Parish in Arvada, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Richard Antinora, reappointed deacon at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish in Ft. Collins, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Joseph Benjamin, reappointed deacon at St. Joseph Parish in Akron, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Richard Borda, relieved of duties at Shrine of St. Anne Parish in Arvada and appointed deacon at Holy Trinity Parish in Westminster, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Richard Boyd, granted retirement status, effective June 1, 2019.

Deacon George Brown, granted retirement status, effective May 1, 2019.

Deacon Henry Concha, reappointed deacon at Annunciation Parish in Denver, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Robert Cropp, reappointed deacon at St. Thomas More Parish in Centennial, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Peter Hung Phi Dang, reappointed deacon at Queen of Vietnamese Martyrs Parish in Wheat Ridge, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Oscar DelVillar, reappointed deacon at Immaculate Conception Parish in Lafayette, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Ruben Estrada, reappointed deacon at Ascension Parish in Denver, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Michael Fletcher, reappointed deacon at Christ on the Mountain Parish in Lakewood, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Gregory Frank, reappointed deacon at St. Mary Parish in Littleton, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Joseph Gerber, reappointed deacon at St. Joan of Arc Parish in Arvada, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Charles Goldburg, granted faculties in the Archdiocese of Denver and coming from the Diocese of Rockville Centre, NY appointed deacon at Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception in Denver, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Hal Goldwire, relieved of duties at St. Vincent de Paul Parish in Denver and appointed deacon at St. Bernadette Parish in Lakewood, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon William Hastings, reappointed deacon at St. Peter Parish in Greeley, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Martin Hetzel, granted retirement status, effective June 1, 2019.

Deacon Timothy Kenny, relieved of duties at St. Thomas More Parish in Centennial and appointed deacon at Risen Christ Parish in Denver, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Dennis Langdon, reappointed deacon at St. Joseph Parish in Golden, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Kevin Leiner, reappointed deacon at Notre Dame Parish in Denver, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Wilfredo Liwanag, reappointed deacon at St. Michael the Archangel Parish in Aurora, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon David Luksch, reappointed deacon at Sacred Heart of Jesus Parish in Boulder, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Mario Martha-Pro, relieved of duties at St. William Parish in Ft. Lupton and appointed deacon at St. Helena Parish in Ft. Morgan, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon James Parrilli, granted faculties in the Archdiocese of Denver, coming from the Diocese of Palm Beach, FL appointed deacon at Christ the King Parish in Denver, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Anthony Pierson, granted retirement status, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Cesar Perez, relieved of duties at Our Lady of Peace Parish in Greeley and appointed deacon at St. Peter Parish in Greeley, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Mark Salvato, reappointed deacon at Risen Christ Parish in Denver, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Andrew Sanchez, relieved of duties as St. John the XXIII Parish in Ft. Collins appointed deacon at Our Lady of the Valley Parish in Windsor, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Donald Schaefer, reappointed deacon at Holy Name Parish in Denver, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Charles Schultz, reappointed deacon at St. Mark Parish in Westminster, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon William Senger, appointed deacon at Our Lady of Peace in Silverthorne, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Steven Stemper, reappointed deacon at St. Thomas More Parish in Centennial, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon George Thierjung, relieved of duties at Our Lady of the Mountains Parish in Estes Park and appointed deacon at St. Francis of Assisi Parish in Longmont, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Steven Vallero, reappointed deacon at Nativity of Our Lord Parish in Broomfield, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Patrick Whaley, relieved of duties at Good Shepherd Parish and appointed deacon at St. Vincent de Paul Parish in Denver, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Richard Wilson, reappointed deacon at St. Helena Parish in Ft. Morgan, effective July 1, 2019.

Deacon Paul Zajac, reappointed deacon at St. Anthony of Padua Parish in Denver, effective July 1, 2019.

Featured image by Brandon Young

COMING UP: Why stay in the Church?

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There are many people who have either left the Church or are currently considering leaving because of the scandals of recent decades. We have felt pain and righteous anger at our leaders and have suffered scandal from their betrayal. For some, the grand jury reports and lack of accountability for bishops have been the last straw. It’s hard to blame people for feeling this way, but we have to ask with Peter, “to whom, Lord, shall we go?” (John 6:68).

Significantly, this question comes after many disciples walked out on Jesus for his teaching on the Eucharist, and it is the Eucharist that should be at the center of any response to the crisis. Peter answers his own question: “you have the words of everlasting life” (John 6:68). The Church is Jesus’ own body in the world, and we are members of his mystical body, given eternal life by consuming his own flesh at Mass. Without the Eucharist, Jesus’ presence in the flesh, the very heart of the Church, where would we be?

Bishop Robert Barron echoes Peter’s question in a recent pamphlet-style book, with over a million copies in print, Letter to a Suffering Church: A Bishop Speaks on the Sexual Abuse Crisis (Word on Fire, 2019). He turns to the Bible and Church history to look for perspective on the crisis. Because of the centrality of the Eucharist in the Church, the betrayal of some of our priests and bishops takes on greater significance. They act in persona Christi at Mass, offering the sacrifice of Christ on the Cross to the Father, and we depend on them for our sacramental life.

Fortunately, the validity of the sacraments does not depend upon the sinlessness of priests, but rather the holiness of God. Barron points out, however, that priests will not get off easy, given the extremely harsh words that Jesus offers to those who lead children astray: “Whoever receives one such child in my name receives me;  but whoever causes one of these little ones who believe in me to sin,  it would be better for him to have a great millstone fastened round his neck and to be drowned in the depth of the sea. Woe to the world for temptations to sin! For it is necessary that temptations come, but woe to the man by whom the temptation comes!” (Mt 18:7-9). Barron also references the punishment of Eli, in 1 Samuel 2-4, who as priest and judge of Israel watched his own sons, who were also priests, abuse the people. Barron argues that this scene gives us the best example of God’s retribution for allowing abuse to happen and not correcting it.

Barron also looks at the tumultuous story of Church history for context on the current crisis. Although the Church is the mystical body of Christ, he references St. Paul assertion that we bear our treasure in earthen vessels, as evidenced by the human weakness of Christians throughout history. In fact, this weakness manifests the Lord’s grace guiding and preserving the Church in spite of us. Barron quotes Belloc that a proof of the Church’s divine foundation “might be found in the fact that no merely human institution conducted with such knavish imbecility would have lasted a fortnight” (43). Heresies, sinful popes, and sexual perversity have not fundamentally destroyed the Lord’s work, even if they have turned many people away. God has promised to remain with his Church and his providence will guide us especially through dark moments.

The crisis challenges us and raises the question of why we are Catholic. Most of us have been born Catholic and may take our faith for granted as something we’ve inherited from our parents. We may view belonging to the Church like membership in a voluntary organization. Rather, our life as members of Christ’s Body is a gift from God that changes our identity and unites us to God and our fellow Christians. As we experience challenges to faith, it is an opportunity to embrace this identity even more strongly — not as something that depends upon myself or anyone else in the Church, but on God. We go to Church to honor and thank him and to receive his grace, not to be a part of a human organization.

The Church is a family, called together by God, but, like any family, we experience pain from our own and each other’s sinfulness. As family, we can’t give up on each other, but have to “stay and fight” as Barron exhorts us, helping each other to be faithful to the mission that Jesus gave us: to love one another as he has loved us and to share the Good News of his salvation.

Featured Photo by Josh Applegate on Unsplash