Knights of Columbus Fish Fry Fridays are back

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Lent is just around the corner, which can mean only one thing: Knights of Columbus Fish Fry Fridays are back.

For a full list of local Knights fish fry’s, scroll to the bottom of this post.

For decades, the Knights of Columbus have gathered every Friday during lent to provide non-meat dinner options for the community committed to fasting. They also benefit parishioners through the spiritual enrichment of praying the Stations of the Cross and support many programs within the community.

“As part of building the domestic church while strengthening our parishes, we support many programs that pertain to faith, life, family and community by putting our faith in action,” said Clark Musser, State Programs Coordinator of the Knights of Columbus. “The dinners are just one way we can involve almost all aspects of our Faith in Action Initiative in one evening.”

By hosting these dinners, the Knights of Columbus make it easier for parishioners to participate in the Stations of the Cross during Lent by freeing up their meal preparation time and allowing them to bring their family to Church to attend Lent services.

“As Knights, we are Catholic men that support our clergy and church. This is just one way we can help bring families together and strengthen the faith of not just us Knights but of the parish and community also,” Musser said.

Everyone is invited to attend a Fish Fry dinner. While most Knights of Columbus councils serve Fish Fry’s, some of them serve soup for a minimal fee to cover expenses or even just a donation at some parishes.
For Musser, the dinners are more than just a Fish Fry, “It’s a faith, family and community building event.”

Fish Fry Fridays have become so popular that the Knights have their own recipe for the batter. The Knights of Columbus invite all to enjoy a delicious lent dinner, support their local parish, and strengthen their faith at the Stations of the Cross.

Below are all the fish fry’s we could find. Special thanks to the Knights of Columbus for helping us compile this list!

Arvada Spirit of Christ 7400 w 80th ave Spirit of Christ March 6, 27 5pm
Arvada Shrine of Saint Anne Saint Joachim Starting March 13, all Fridays after that
Aurora Queen of Peace Catholic Church  13120 E Kentucky Ave Bishop Evans All Fridays
Aurora St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church 19099 E Floyd Ave Archangel Council All Fridays
Breckingridge St Mary Our Lady of the Summit Soup Dinners – all fridays
Colorado Springs St Patrick’s St Patrick’s Council Feb 28, March 6 6pm
Colorado Springs Saint Francis of Assisi Mount Saint Francis All Friday’s
Colorado Springs / Saint Mary Cathedral / Saint Mary Cathedral March 6, April 3, 6:30
Colorado Springs Divine Redeemer Divine Redeemer All Friday’s
Colorado Springs St. Paul’s St. Paul’s Feb 28, March 6, 13, 20
Colorado Springs Our Lady of Guadalupe Our Lady of Guadalupe All Friday’s
Colorado Springs St. Joseph  St. Joseph the Worker March 6 and 20th
Craig Saint Michael’s 678 School Street  Saint Michael the Archangel Feb 7th, 28th March 20th
Denver Church of the Risen Christ Roman Catholic Church 3060 South Monaco Parkway Our Lady of the Luminous Mysteries Council 5-7 before stations of the Cross
Florence Saint Benedict’s Florence Council Every Friday, except for Good Friday. Soup dinner
Foxfield Our Lady of Loreto Catholic Church  18000 E Arapahoe Rd Our Lady of Loreto Feb 28, March 13, 27
Ft Collins St Joseph Fort Collins March 27, April 3
Ft Collins Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton Every Friday
Greeley St Mary Parish FR BUD RANEY COUNCIL All Fridays 5-7
Greeley St Peter parish FR BUD RANEY COUNCIL Feb 28, April 3 5-7
Highlands Ranch Pax Christi Rev. Robert F. Houlihan, S.J. Feb 28th, March 13 and 27 7pm
Johnstown St John the Baptist Holy Trinity III March 27th, 5pm
Lakewood Christ on the Mountain Parish, Christ on the Mountain All Friday’s, 5 – 7
Littleton St. Francis Cabrini Parish Arch-Bishop James B. Casey All Friday’s, 5 – 7
Littleton Light of the World  Parish Father Francis Syrainey All Friday’s, 5 – 7
Loveland St John the Evangelist Big Thompson All Friday’s, 5 – 7, in the Knights Hall
Longmont Saint Francis of Assisi Longmont Every Friday 5pm
Longmont St John the Baptist St John the Baptist Council Every Friday, 5pm
Mead Guardian Angels Our Lady of the Angels Every Friday, 5pm
Northglenn Immaculate Heart of Mary Archbishop Fulton J Sheen All Fridays 4:30-6:45
Pagosa Springs Immaculate Heart of Mary Immaculate Heart of Mary All Friday’s
Parker Ave Maria Ave Maria Every Friday. 4:30
Pueblo Christ the King Parish North Pueblo Every Friday, except for Good Friday. 4-6:30
Salt Creek St Joseph 1145 S. Aspen Road Rev. Charles Murray SJ Council 9456 Feb 28th only
Security St Dominic 5354 South Highway U.S. 85 Holy Family March 20 6pm
Silverthorne Our Lady of Peace Our Lady of the Summit Fish – all fridays
Steamboat Springs Holy Name Fr. Printer
Thornton Holy Cross Holy Cross All Friday’s, soup dinners with a Fish dinner on the last Friday before Good Friday.
Westminster St Marks St Marks All Fridays 4:30-6:45
Windsor Our Lady of the Valley Our Lady of the Valley March 6, 13 5-7
Woodland Park Our Lady of the Woods Teller County Ash Wed, Every Wed after soup dinners

Saint John XXIII Council at Saint John in Ft. Collins,  2/28, 3/6, 3/13 & 3/20

Guardian Angeles at Guardian Angels Denver April 3 Soup Dinner

Mother of the Church at our Lady Mother of the Church in Commerce City, Feb 28, March 13 and 27 5-7

Coronado at Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Denver, All Fridays during Lent except March 20

Our Lady of the Pines in Conifer, every Friday during Lent from 4:30 to 7 p.m.

St. James Parish in Denver, every Friday during Lent from 4:30 to 7 p.m.

St. John Paul KofC #17142 will be having a Soup Dinner 5:00pm to 6:30pm, prior to Stations of the Cross at 7:00pm on March 6th, March 20th & April 3rd at St. John Paul II Parish/Frassati Catholic Academy.

St Thomas More Council #10205 will be serving Fish Dinner every Friday from 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm before Stations of the Cross (except for Good Friday) at St. Thomas More, 8035 S. Quebec St. in Centennnial.

Don’t see your parish’s fish fry here? Let us know at info@archden.org and we’ll add it!

COMING UP: Five Colorado places named after Catholic saints

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On Aug. 1, Colorado will have made it way over the hill at a ripe 144 years old. Better known as Colorado Day, the day commemorates the founding of our great Centennial State in 1876.

The Catholic Church has a rich history in Colorado, and believe it or not, various regions, geographic landmarks and places in the state are named after Catholic saints. The San Juan Mountain Range, the San Miguel River and the San Luis Valley are but a few examples.

In honor of Colorado Day, here are five places within “Colorful Colorado” that take their namesake from a Catholic saint. You probably already know a couple of them, but the other three are real “diamonds in the rough” that are worth making the trek; in fact, two of them were built and founded before Colorado was even Colorado.

Mother Cabrini Shrine, Golden, CO

 

One of Colorado’s most popular pilgrimage sites, it’s hard not to be enamored by Mother Cabrini Shrine. Originally founded as a girls’ summer camp by St. Frances Cabrini in 1910, the shrine overlooks the I-70 corridor heading into the mountains and is as charming as it is relaxing. In addition to the praying in the chapel, visitors can stay in the old Stone House that was built in 1914 or one of the various retreat houses that have been added over the years. Aside from being a wonderful space to pray, Mother Cabrini Shrine doubles as a sort of natural Stairmaster to get those steps in with the 373-step staircase leading up to the shrine, affectionately known as the Stairway of Prayer.

St. Catherine of Siena Chapel, Allenspark, CO

Photo by Andrew Wright

Better known as the Chapel on the Rock, this functioning Catholic chapel is perhaps one of Colorado’s most iconic landmarks. As the story goes, in the early 20th century, a man by the name of William McPhee owned the land where the chapel stands, known as Camp St. Malo. McPhee was a parishioner of the Cathedral in Denver, and he often allowed the parish to take kids hiking and camping on his property. During one of those trips, several campers saw a meteorite or shooting star that had appeared to hit the earth. They went looking for it and came upon the Rock that now stands as the foundation of St. Catherine of Siena Chapel. Completed in 1936, the chapel’s official namesake is fitting, as both it and St. Catherine of Siena share a common thread of mystical experiences facilitated by the Lord. It has had many visitors over the years, but perhaps none so famous as St. John Paul II who, ever the outdoorsman, just had to make a stop while in Denver for World Youth Day in 1993.

Abbey of St. Walburga, Virginia Dale, CO

 

Photo courtesy of the Abbey of St. Walburga

Located in the picturesque Virginia Dale, a small community just south of the Wyoming border, the Abbey of St. Walburga is a place where the voice of the Lord lives in the mountains, plains and rivers surrounding it. Named for the patroness of the Benedictine nuns, the abbey was founded in 1935 when three sisters from the Abbey of St. Walburg in Eichstätt, Bavaria were sent to a remote farm in what was Boulder. There, they built a strong foundation for the future of the abbey through hard work, poverty and an immovable trust in God’s providence. Today, the Benedictine nuns of Walburga humbly carry out the good works of the Benedictine order and carry on the legacy started nearly a millennium ago in 1035, when the original Walburg abbey in Eichstätt was founded.

San Luis, CO

Photo by Jeremy Elliot

Moving into the southern most regions of the State of Colorado, the Catholic roots of the region become much more evident. The oldest town in Colorado, San Luis, was founded in 1851 on the Feast of St. Louis, and predates the official founding of Colorado as a state by 25 years. The town is located along the Sangre de Cristo mountain range, which translates to “Blood of Christ.” One of the main attractions of the small town of just over 600 is a shrine at the town’s local Catholic parish. The Shrine of the Stations of the Cross was built by the parishioners of Sangre de Cristo Parish and the beautiful stations were designed and sculpted by native San Luis sculptor Huberto Maesta.

Capilla de Viejo San Acacio, Costilla County, CO

Photo from Wikicommons

Just to the west of the town of San Luis lies one of Colorado’s oldest gems. The Chapel of Old St. Acacius, or Capilla de Viejo San Acacio as it’s known to the locals, is the oldest non-Native American religious site in Colorado that’s still active today. While the building of the church cannot be dated precisely, it was likely completed sometime in the 1860s. The namesake of the church comes from St. Acacius of Byzantium, a third century martyr. Near the church is the small village of San Acacio, which a local tradition holds got its name after one of the earliest San Luis Valley settlements, originally called Culebra Abajo, was attacked by a band of Ute in 1853. As the Ute attackers approached, the villagers asked for the intercession of St Acacius, a popular saint among their people. The Ute suddenly halted and fled before they reached the town, scared off by a vision of well-armed warriors defending it. In gratitude for this salvation, the village was renamed San Acacio, and the villagers built a mission church in honor of the saint.