June 7 marks 100 years since Julia Greeley’s death

Archbishop to celebrate special Mass honoring the life of Denver’s 'Angel of Charity’

Aaron Lambert

“Is she a saint?”

File photo

So read the headline on the cover of the April 15, 1998 issue of the Denver Catholic Register, coupled with a picture of Julia Greeley. Little did the staff of the paper at the time know that 20 years later, her life would be actively scrutinized to answer that question.

Julia Greeley’s Cause for Canonization was opened Dec. 18, 2016 and she is now called a “Servant of God.” While a cause can typically take years to complete, there’s still plenty of reasons to reflect upon the life of this inspiring woman and look to the example of holiness she set during her time on earth.

June 7 will be a day to do just that, as it marks the 100th anniversary of the death of Julia Greeley. Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila will celebrate a Mass at the Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception to honor the life of Denver’s “Angel of Charity,” as she came to be known, and all are invited to partake in the celebration. What’s more is that the governor’s office will issue an official proclamation declaring the week of June 3 – 9 be recognized as “Julia Greeley Week.”

Click here to watch a livestream of the Mass on June 7.

As part of the festivities, Denver firefighters will provide an honor guard in recognition of Greeley’s own devotion to the Sacred Heart and her steadfast dedication to handing out Sacred Heart pamphlets to Denver fire stations.

Little is known about Julia Greeley and her life, but over the years, pieces of the puzzle have begun to come together. Capuchin Friar Father Blaine Burkey became fascinated with Greeley some years ago and compiled the most comprehensive volume on her life to date, entitled In Secret Service of the Sacred Heart: The Life and Virtues of Julia Greeley. 

Greeley earned a reputation as being a woman of charity as she walked the streets of Denver at night, hauling around food, clothes and other charitable goods in a little red wagon to hand out to those in need. As part of the canonization process, her bones were exhumed in November of last year and showed that she suffered from severe arthritis, meaning this task was likely a painful one for her. Nonetheless, she persisted through the pain and still found immense joy in serving others.

The Julia Greeley Guild is working hard to raise money to fund the expenses for Julia’s cause. Details on how to help contribute to the cause will be offered at the June 7 Mass, and the guild has several fundraisers planned, including one on June 10. The guild is also asking that anyone who had a devotion to Julia Greeley prior to their formation in 2011 send in a testimonial describing their long-standing devotion to her. These testimonies could help to move her cause along.

Monsignor Matthew Smith, founding editor of the Denver Catholic Register, wrote of Greeley in her 1918 obituary, “Her life reads like that of a canonized saint.” With prayer, grace and a commitment by the faithful to keeping Greeley’s memory alive, Msgr. Smith might not have been far off. Julia Greeley, pray for us!

Julia Greeley 100th anniversary Mass
Thursday, June 7, 5:30 p.m.
Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception

Julia Greeley Fundraiser

Sunday, June 10
Trattoria Stella, 3201 E. Colfax Ave.
5 p.m. – 9 p.m.

10% of the proceeds from the restaurant will go toward Julia Greeley’s cause

COMING UP: Local artists choose life in pro-life art show

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For someone who’s always been in love with art, it’s not surprising that Brett Lempe first encountered God through beauty. Lempe, a 25-year-old Colorado native, used his talent for art and new-found love of God to create a specifically pro-life art show after a planned show was cancelled because of Lempe’s pro-life views.

Lempe was “dried out with earthly things,” he said. “I was desperately craving God.”

Three years ago, while living in St. Louis, Mo., Lempe google searched for a church to visit and ended up at the Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis.

“I was captivated by the beauty of the 40 million mosaic tiles,” he said.

Lempe is not exaggerating. This Cathedral is home to 41.5 million tiles that make up different mosaics around the sanctuary. Witnessing the beauty of this church is what sparked his conversion, he said, and was his first major attraction towards Catholicism.

Lempe continued on to become Catholic, then quit his job several months after joining the Church to dedicate himself completely to art. Most of his work post-conversion is religious art.

Lempe planned to display a non-religious body of artwork at a venue for a month when his contact at the venue saw some of Lempe’s pro-life posts on Facebook. Although none of the artwork Lempe planned to display was explicitly pro-life or religious, the venue cancelled the show.

“I was a little bit shocked at first,” he said. “Something like me being against abortion or being pro-life would get a whole art show cancelled.”

Lempe decided to counter with his own art show, one that would be explicitly pro-life.

On Sept. 7, seven Catholic artists displayed work that gave life at the Knights of Columbus Hall in Denver.

“Catholicism lends itself to being life-giving,” Lempe said.

The show included a variety of work from traditional sacred art, icons, landscapes, to even dresses.

Students for Life co-hosted the event, and 10 percent of proceeds benefited the cause. Lauren Castillo, Development director and faith-based program director at Students for Life America gave the keynote presentation.

Castillo spoke about the need to be the one pro-life person in each circle of influence, with coworkers, neighbors, family, or friends. The reality of how many post-abortive women are already in our circles is big, she said.

“Your friend circle will get smaller,” Castillo said. “If one life is saved, it’s worth it.”

Pro-Life Across Mediums

Brett Lempe’s Luke 1:35

“This painting is the first half at an attempt of displaying the intensity and mystical elements of Luke 1:35,” Lempe said. “This work is influenced somewhat by Michelangelo’s ‘Creation of Adam’ painting as I try to capture the moment when the “New Adam” is conceived by Our Blessed Mother.”

Claire Woodbury’s icon of Christ Pantokrator

“I was having a difficult time making that icon,” she said. “I was thinking it would become a disaster.”

She felt Jesus saying to her, “This is your way of comforting me. Is that not important?”

“Icons are very important to me,” she said. “I guess they’re important to Him too.”

Katherine Muser’s “Goodnight Kisses”

“Kids naturally recognize the beauty of a baby and they just cherish it,” Muser said of her drawing of her and her sister as children.

Brie Shulze’s Annunciation

“There is so much to unpack in the Annunciation,” Schulze said. “I wanted to unpack that life-giving yes that our Blessed Mother made on behalf of all humanity.”

“Her yes to uncertainty, to sacrifice, to isolation, to public shame and to every other suffering that she would endure is what allowed us to inherit eternal life.”

“Her fiat was not made in full knowledge of all that would happen, but in love and total surrender to the will of God.”

All photos by Makena Clawson