‘Julia’s canoe’ fills with prayer intentions

Testimonies of miraculous intercession by Julia Greeley could help move her cause for canonization forward

Moira Cullings

Julia Greeley’s selfless life has captured the attention of Catholics around the world.

Many believe the former slave and now Servant of God who spent her life serving others is answering their prayers and providing miracles for themselves and their loved ones.

“It really grounds me in the sense that she should be a saint,” said Mary Leisring, Director of the Office of Black Catholic Ministry and President of the Julia Greeley Guild. “Hopefully Rome sees that as well.”

The next step in Julia’s cause for canonization would be for her to become venerable, then after one miracle to become blessed and after one more to become a saint.

The Julia Greeley Guild, which is currently made up of 140 people, knows of 849 “friends of Julia” who have written in seeking relics and additional information about Julia. The Guild also receives prayer intentions, which it prays for through her intercession.

“I’m blessed in a lot of ways to be able to be the president of the guild and read all the things that are happening for her and by her and in her,” said Leisring.

The guild has received several testimonies from people who believe their prayers through Julia’s intercession have been answered. Those testimonies could become crucial if Julia makes it to the venerable phase.

It would be no surprise if Julia plays a part in answering the prayers of those who seek her help — Julia once responded to a local grocery and café employee’s request for prayers with, “Mary, I’ll put you in a canoe with a lot of others I pray for. …”

“She used that metaphor to tell people that she would pray for them,” said Leisring.

The guild accepts prayers through a virtual canoe via email but hopes to obtain a real canoe, place it in the Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception where Julia’s body is interred, and allow visitors to put their prayer intentions inside it.

Those who have already added their intentions to Julia’s canoe and expressed interest in her life give Leisring hope that the cause will continue to move forward.

“Her life story is such a powerful story,” she said.

Leisring believes after Julia lost her eye when a slave master caught it with his whip, “somehow the Holy Spirit and the Lord touched Julia and guided her and graced her to be able to treat people and serve the poor, serve firemen, anybody she met.

“They didn’t have to be Catholic,” she added, “she was always just a giving person.”

Leisring hopes Julia’s selfless service continues to inspire others to strive for holiness.

“Here’s a person that I really believe has been graced by God to do the things she did in the era that she did them,” said Leisring. “It shows that ordinary people can become extraordinary.”

If you have an urgent petition, send a brief report of it to juliascanoe@gmail.com or by mail to Julia Greeley Guild, 1535 N. Logan St., Denver CO 80203. Visit juliagreeley.org for more information or if you are interested  in joining the Julia Greeley Guild.

COMING UP: The Sistine Chapel comes to Stanley Marketplace

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The Sistine Chapel comes to Stanley Marketplace

Exhibit gives visitors a chance to see Michelangelo’s masterpiece up close

Moira Cullings

Colorado residents will have an opportunity to gaze upon Michelangelo’s famous works of art — right in their own backyard.

The Sistine Chapel exhibit, coming to the Hangar at Stanley Marketplace in Aurora, offers visitors an up-close perspective of Michelangelo’s work.

“At its max, the Sistine Chapel’s ceiling reaches heights of over 60 feet,” said Eric Leong, Associate Producer at SEE Global Entertainment. “But at our exhibit, you can examine the artwork from mere inches away in some instances.

“It’s as if you have the same view Michelangelo did when he originally painted it.”

Co-produced by the Hangar and SEE Global Entertainment, the exhibit will run from July 4 until August 13.

Tickets can be purchased online or at the door, and group tickets are also available.

Visitors explore Michelangelo’s work at the Sistine Chapel exhibit in Tacoma, Washington last year. The exhibit will come to the Hangar at Stanley Marketplace from July 4-August 13. Photos by Lisa Money Photography

Bryant Palmer, Chief Storyteller at Stanley Marketplace, explained that exhibits like the Sistine Chapel embody what Stanley hopes to offer Colorado residents.

“Bringing it to Colorado in a way that’s easily accessible fits right in with pretty much everything we’re trying to do at Stanley Marketplace,” he said.

After visiting the Sistine Chapel during college, Palmer was intrigued but felt that “it wasn’t as intimate as I had hoped for,” he said.

“The biggest thing that I’ve learned since then is how little access you have to see the detail in Michelangelo’s work.”

This exhibit changes the game, offering people the unique chance to see the details.

“The breadth of [Michelangelo’s] work and how many different human figures and expressions he put in the Sistine Chapel is just incredible,” said Palmer. “In this exhibition, you’ll be able to see that and study it from just a couple feet away.”

Both Leong and Palmer emphasized how crucial exhibits like this can be in preserving art and other aspects of history.

“With the recent fire at the Notre Dame Cathedral, we were all reminded how precious our most revered works of art truly are and how important it is to preserve and celebrate them,” said Leong.

“Disasters happen,” said Palmer, “so an exhibition like this really preserves that and makes it something that will last forever.”

The exhibit has already had success in several cities around the world, including Munich, Panama City and Shanghai, and visitors “love being able to absorb the details of the artwork at their own pace in a comfortable environment,” said Leong.

Palmer hopes that will also be the case here in Colorado.

“Art is one of the things that gives meaning to the world, and especially a piece of work like this that really does tell in part the story of humanity,” he said. “I think that’s really powerful.”