Join local Catholic nonprofits in #GivingTuesday movement

Denver Catholic Staff

‘Tis the season to do good, but especially on Giving Tuesday.

Americans are more generous than ever, according to a report by Giving USA, especially on Giving Tuesday, an online movement specifically focused on giving to charity on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving.

Giving USA found that U.S. charities saw an estimated $410 billion in donations in 2017, an increase of nearly 5.2 percent from 2016. Giving to religious organizations increased 2.9 percent, with an estimated $127 billion in contributions. And many givers chose #GivingTuesday to share their generosity, giving $274 million last year, according to The Nonprofit Times.

On this special giving day and throughout the holiday season, people volunteer, raise awareness and donate money to charitable organizations of their choice. Such online giving opportunities to Catholic organizations are available right here in Northern Colorado

Giving that does good

“Leaving a gift in support of our Catholic faith is perhaps the easiest way to show your love for our God and His Church – giving back a portion of all He has given us,” said Jean Finegan, director of planned giving and development for The Catholic Foundation of Northern Colorado.

The Catholic Foundation, based in Denver, is a generous giver’s most efficient way to support multiple charities, with its ability to offer various options including appreciated stock, planned gifts, real estate and personal property, retirement plans, insurance policies and more.
Finegan said even if cash is not on hand, there are other avenues to give back in faith.

Making a difference

Giving is as much about the receiver as the giver, and Catholic Charities of Denver offers something for everyone.

Its continuum of care model offers multiple services to those in need. From Marisol Health, a network of medical clinics that provide life-affirming care, to shelter services, which provide short- and long-term housing and supportive services to help individuals and families become self-reliant—givers can see their generosity provide both material and spiritual support.

Catholic Charities offers opportunities to pray, volunteer and donate to all its ministries including Early Childhood Education, Gabriel House Project, Marisol Women’s Services, Shelter Services, Family and Senior Services, St. Raphael Counseling, Archdiocesan Housing and more.

“Charity requires both a person who gives and a person who receives,” said Darren Walsh, president and CEO of Catholic Charities of Denver. “Giving Tuesday makes it easy to participate in charitable work with the click of a mouse, and what better way to take part than by supporting the crucial services we provide to so many in our community. We’re grateful to everyone who makes charity possible.”

Volunteers serve lunch at Catholic Charities in Larimer County.

Investing in future generations

“We really want to make it possible for any family that is in need to send their kid to Catholic school if they so desire,” said Jay Clark, executive director of Seeds of Hope. “The face of Northern Colorado is changing, which means where people are in need is changing as well.”

Seeds of Hope, which makes Catholic education accessible to needy students, expanded its mission to provide aid to any of the Archdiocese of Denver’s 37 Catholic schools, beyond the nine urban schools previously served. Giving to the organization would provide more children with a quality Catholic education and bright future.

Daisy, a former Seeds of Hope recipient, spoke at the annual Evening of Hope Gala on how the scholarship from Seeds of Hope helped change her life. (Photo by James Baca)

Givers passionate about Catholic education can continue their support by giving to Bishop Machebeuf High School and Holy Family High School. Both archdiocesan schools offer a faith-based environment and rigorous academics that setup youth for success.

Bishop Machebeuf High School was awarded recognition as a National Catholic Education Honor Roll School by The Cardinal Newman Society.

Holy Family High School first opened in 1922. Today, the school continues it’s mission to provide a Catholic learning environment that stresses academic excellence, fosters mutual respect, demands responsibility, and encourages self-growth.

Building a community

Centro San Juan Diego, the groundbreaking institute that provides faith formation and education services to enrich the lives of Hispanics in Denver, offers givers a chance to build the community.

The growing number of Hispanic individuals and families in the archdiocese presented a need to empower and support their development into faithful and integrated leaders of the community.

Givers can support the organization’s programs including, citizenship and English classes, tax preparation, small business training, computer classes, Bibles studies, youth faith formation, family ministry, lay pastoral minister certification, online bachelor’s degrees and more.
A gift to Centro is an investment in the community.

Monica Chavez, far left, and Norma Moreno and Esteban Palafox made up the first graduating class from Centro San Juan Diego (CSJD). The bachelor’s degree program is made possible through a partnership between CSJD and Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla (UPAEP). (Photo by Nissa LaPoint)

Help to accomplish great things across the Archdiocese

If you want to give to the Catholic Church but aren’t exactly sure which ministry or parish your donation will best support, then consider the Archbishop’s Catholic Appeal. Donations to this appeal make an impact across the Archdiocese of Denver by supporting Catholic schools and students, shelter services, seminaries, religious education, centralized operations and resources, and parishes.

As followers of Christ who embodied perfect charity we are called to support the charitable outreach efforts of our Archdiocesan Church.

 Support priestly formation

The Archdiocese of Denver is blessed to have two well-known seminaries that offer future priests exceptional academic and spiritual formation. Combined, there are 128 seminarians in the St. John Vianney and Redemptoris Mater seminaries. Without the ongoing prayerful and financial support, some priestly vocations might be left without spiritual nourishment and guidance. Your gift will certainly be an encouragement and inspiration for the seminarians and future priests. Donations for the seminaries can be made online at sjvrm.org.

The Archdiocese of Denver is blessed to have two nationally-recognized seminaries that offer our future priests exceptional academic and spiritual formation. (Photo by James Baca)

COMING UP: Why 42 had to be impeached twenty years ago

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Twenty years ago this month, I found myself seriously double-booked, so to speak.

The editing of the first volume of my John Paul II biography, Witness to Hope, was entering the ninth inning, and I was furiously engaged in exchanging edited and re-edited copy with my editors in New York. At the same time, the Clinton impeachment drama was cresting. And as I had long done speechwriting for Congressman Henry Hyde, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, I spent week after week of split time, working on John Paul II from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., then switching to impeachment for a couple of hours before returning to Witness to Hope in the evening.

It was not the optimal way to work but it had to be done, even if it seemed likely that the president would be acquitted in a Senate trial. On December 19, 1998, the House of Representatives voted two articles of impeachment and senior House members, including Mr. Hyde, solemnly walked the two articles across the Capitol and presented them to the Senate’s leaders. On toward midnight, Henry Hyde called me and, referring to Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott, said, “We’re not going to make it. Trent won’t fight; I saw it in his eyes.” After a long moment I replied that, if we were going to lose, we had a duty to lay down a record with which history would have to reckon.

Which is what the great Henry Hyde did during the January 1999 Senate trial, where he bent every effort to prevent the proceedings from descending into farce.

For Hyde, the impeachment of President Bill Clinton was an unavoidable piece of nasty business. It was not a matter of partisan score-settling, nor was it a matter of punishing a president for gross behavior with an intern in the White House. It was a matter of defending the rule of law. As Henry put it to me when it seemed clear that the president had perjured himself and obstructed justice, “There are over a hundred people in federal prisons for these crimes. How can the chief law enforcement officer of the United States be guilty of them and stay in office?”

Impeachment is a political process and it was clear by mid-fall of 1998 that the politics were not breaking toward removing the president from office. They had been pointed that way over the summer, though. And as the pressures built, it seemed as if the Clinton presidency might end as Richard Nixon’s had: Party elders, in this case Democrats, would go to the White House, explain that it was over, and ask the president to resign for the sake of the country. Then around Labor Day that year, Maureen Dowd of the New York Times and other columnists began suggesting that, if Clinton were impeached and convicted, the sexual revolution would be over, the yahoos of reaction would have won, and we’d be back to something resembling Salem, Massachusetts, during the witchcraft insanity.

That was preposterous. It was also effective. And within days, at least in Washington, you could fill the templates shifting: This wasn’t about the rule of law, it was about sex and the yahoos couldn’t be allowed to win. (That Henry Hyde was the leader of the pro-life forces in Congress neatly fit this storyline, of course, abortion being a major plank in the platform of the sexual revolution.)

So once the game was redefined — Are you for or against the puritanical yahoos? — there was little chance to wrench the political process back to what it was really about: the rule of law. In his opening speech during the president’s trial, Henry Hyde tried valiantly to refocus the argument, insisting that high office did not absolve a man from obeying his constitutional oath to faithfully execute the laws of the United States and his oath swearing to tell the truth to a federal grand jury. To suggest that it did was to “break the covenant of trust” between president and people, dissolving “the mortar that binds the foundation stones of our freedom into a secure and solid edifice.”

It wasn’t a winning argument. But it was the right argument. And on this 20th anniversary, the nation should remember with gratitude those like Henry Hyde who, under fierce assault, stood for the rule of law.

Featured image by Gage Skidmore | Flickr