Getting to know Mary, Our Mother

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Leading up to the Oct. 13 consecration of the Archdiocese of Denver to the Immaculate Heart of Mary, the archdiocese will release a series of five videos called Marian Moments, that seek to help the faithful grow closer to Mary by learning more about her virtues, and imitating those virtues in daily life.

The videos will be accompanied by suggested readings from Scripture and Tradition, and a classic Marian prayer to memorize.

In English, the videos feature Father Ryan O’Neill, vocations director for the Archdiocese of Denver.

In Spanish, the videos feature Bishop Jorge Rodriguez, auxiliary bishop of Denver, Msgr. de los Santos, pastor of Our Lady Mother of Church in Commerce City, Father Benito Hernandez, pastor of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, Father Mauricio Bermudez, parochial vicar at St. Michael the Archangel Parish in Aurora, and Father Mario Ramirez, parochial vicar of Ascension Parish in Denver.

Below are the dates the preparation material will be released with a brief description of the theme of that day.

The simplicity of Mary
September 21

Mary lived a quiet life in Nazareth with Joseph and Jesus, doing God’s will in her daily duties as a wife and mother. She is blessed among all women, yet in her life she was mostly quiet and hidden.

Scripture: Luke 1:39-56 (The Visitation)
Prayer: The Magnificat
Quote: “Mary attributes nothing to her own merits. She refers all her greatness to the gift of the one whose essence is power and whose nature is greatness, for he fills with greatness and strength the small and the weak who believe in him.” -Saint Bede the Venerable

Marian Moment #1: The Simplicity of Mary

Abandonment to the will of God
September 26

This is a quality best portrayed in the Annunciation, where Mary completely accepts God’s will for her life and whatever it meant for her. When she said, “Yes,” she became the vessel of the Savior of the world.

Scripture: Luke 1:26-38 (The Annunciation)
Prayer: The Angelus
Quote: “You have heard, O Virgin, that you will conceive and bear a son; you have heard that it will not be by man but by the Holy Spirit. The angel awaits an answer; it is time for him to return to God who sent him. We too are waiting, O Lady, for your word of compassion; the sentence of condemnation weighs heavily upon us.” -Saint Bernard of Clairvaux

Marian Moment #2: Abandonment to the will of God

Mary’s love for the Cross
September 28

At the Presentation, Simeon told her that a sword would pierce her heart also. When Jesus’ side was pierced, that act pierced her heart as she watched. Mary accompanied Jesus in his life, and in his death.

Scripture: Luke 2: 22-38 (The Presentation)
Prayer: Hail, Holy Queen
Quote: “The Mother of God, the most pure Virgin, carried the true light in her arms and brought him to those who lay in darkness. We too should carry a light for all to see and reflect the radiance of the true light as we hasten to meet him.” -Saint Sophronius

Marian Moment #3: Mary’s love for the Cross

Mary’s love for souls
October 3
Mary loved souls and for that reason she is called “Queen of the Apostles.” Jesus gave her to us as Our Mother. Mary consented to Jesus’ death on the Cross because she loved us so much and knew his plan of salvation for us.

Scripture: John 19: 26-27
Prayer: Memorare
Quote: “With her for guide, you shall never go astray; while invoking her, you shall never lose heart; so long as she is in your mind, you shall not be deceived; while she holds your hand, you cannot fall; under her protection, you have nothing to fear; if she walks before you, you shall not grow weary; if she shows you favor, you shall reach the goal.” -Saint Bernard of Clairvaux

Marian Moment #4: Mary’s love for souls

The Heart of Mary
October 5

The Immaculate Heart of Mary is overflowing with life and grace, and it is tender, inviting and beautiful. We should always go to Jesus through Mary, because this is the way Jesus ordained it.

Scripture: Luke 2:1-20 (Nativity of Jesus)
Prayer: Rosary
Quote: “God is the Father by whom all things were given life, and Mary the mother through whom all things were given new life. For God begot the Son, through whom all things were made, and Mary gave birth to him as the Savior of the world. Without God’s Son, nothing could exist; without Mary’s Son, nothing could be redeemed.” -Saint Anselm

Marian Moment #5: The heart of Mary

COMING UP: Q&A: Deacon Rob Lanciotti, former CDC virologist, shares coronavirus tips

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Deacon Rob Lanciotti of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton in Fort Collins holds a doctoral degree in Microbiology and was employed as a virologist for the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) for 29 years.  Deacon Lanciotti was kind enough to put together this Q&A with more information about coronavirus and how Catholics can keep themselves healthy.

Note: The information is the Q&A is current as of Feb. 28, 2020.

Should I be concerned about the new (COVID-19) coronavirus?

The virus is not yet causing an epidemic in the USA (19 total cases, all but two from returning travelers), however, we need to be prepared for a potential epidemic.  Some proven good prevention practices are what all of us should be doing anyway, since we are in the midst of our annual flu epidemic.  We should also prepare mentally for whatever changes in our lifestyle may occur in the event of an epidemic.  For example, there could be school closings, or some churches may choose to discontinue the Sign of Peace and/or Precious Blood distribution at Masses.

You mention influenza virus, how is the new coronavirus different?

The two viruses are genetically from completely different Families, however, their mode of transmission from one person to another is very similar, and so good prevention methods for flu (and the 200 different common cold viruses) will also work with the new coronavirus.  These viruses can be transmitted when an infected person (usually with symptoms, but not always) expels virus particles by coughing, sneezing, or even breathing.  These aerosolized droplets can directly enter into the respiratory tract of another adjacent person by directly breathing them in, or as they land on the nose or mouth, followed by ingestion.  Alternatively, these droplets may fall onto environmental surfaces, where it is then possible for another person to acquire the virus by touch.  When this person subsequently touches their mouth, nose or eyes, the virus can be ingested leading to an infection.  Under typical room temperature and humidity, these viruses may remain viable for 5-10 days on an uncleaned surface; again, many factors influence this.

Does this new coronavirus cause more serious illness & death?

Overall it is a little bit too early to know for sure.  However, there is preliminary data that suggests the coronavirus is associated with more severe illness and death than the typical flu strain.  For some perspective, there are approximately 30 million flu cases in the USA each year and approximately 30,000 deaths; the mortality rate is therefore 0.1 percent.  Of course, these numbers vary each year, however, the numbers I selected make the math very easy!  Early estimates suggest a mortality rate of one to two percent for the new coronavirus, however it really is too early to know for sure.

What are the “good prevention methods” that you mention?

Keep in mind that these are well established and documented to be effective from many years of studying flu and other viruses with identical transmission profiles.  They are also listed in order of priority with particular consideration of attending Church services.  Finally, these should be practiced every flu season (September-March) regardless of what transpires with the new coronavirus.

If you are experiencing any of the following symptoms; runny nose, coughing, sneezing, muscle aches, fever, etc. the following should be practiced using good judgement based upon the severity of the symptoms:

– Avoid close contact with others. Use good judgement and common sense about attending Church; for example, it may be advisable to stay home (see Catechism 2181).  If you attend church, limit/avoid contact with others.  Perhaps stand in the back of the Church or sit apart; leave immediately after the Final Blessing; do not participate in the Sign of Peace, Communion from the Cup, or especially function as an Extraordinary Minister.  Again, use common sense.

– Wash hands often using soap & hot water or hand sanitizer. However, this is not a “magic bullet” that will allow you to function normally in a Church setting if you are sick.  This is also a good prevention method when you are healthy and come to church where others may be sick.

– Cover your mouth with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hand!) when you cough & sneeze. Coughing or sneezing into your hand will transmit the virus to your hand, then potentially transmit the virus to another person when you shake their hand.  You may even consider wearing a surgical mask, both to prevent spreading to others when sick, as well as preventing your own infection from others.

– Clean environmental surfaces often. This is a reminder for Church employees to be especially diligent during flu season to clean the environment; especially the childcare environments. Any typical cleaner used properly will kill these viruses.

Can I get infected with any of these viruses from the Communion cup?

Believe it or not, there have been a few controlled scientific studies to determine the potential for infections from a shared communion cup.  The summary of these studies is that there is a very low risk of infection overall.  Interestingly, the studies indicate that the mode of infection in this practice is more commonly the touching of the cup with infected hands (from coughing & sneezing etc.) followed by transferring to another person, rather than by saliva.  Take home message is that it is a good practice to avoid receiving the Precious Blood when you are ill.  Remember that theologically speaking, receiving either form of the Eucharist is to receive the fullness of Jesus in the sacrament.

With respect to influenza, should I get the flu vaccine?  I know somebody who got the vaccine and still got sick!

This has become an area of controversy and I will attempt to offer a few simple points for consideration; in the end you should discuss with your doctor.  Keep in mind that there is no perfect vaccine; there are always some unintended adverse reactions to vaccines that occur in very low frequencies, no public health agency would ever claim otherwise.  However, there is no conspiracy among the government or vaccine producers; these have been circulated and unfortunately are depriving the average citizen from making an intelligent informed decision.

First of all, many who receive the flu vaccine and still got sick, were not actually infected by influenza but rather by one of the 200 strains of the common cold viruses.   Yet there are many documented cases of flu illness among vaccine recipients.  In fact, the CDC publishes this information every year.  The vaccine effectiveness ranges from 40-60 percent each year.  From an individualistic standpoint this may not seem like good odds–“If I get the vaccine, I still have a 50 percent chance of getting the flu!”  However, getting the vaccine, even at a 50% effective rate, will have a community-wide prevention benefit; fewer people infected means fewer transmissions and fewer new cases etc.  Estimates are that well over 20,000 deaths are prevented each year by this vaccine, in spite of the fact that many individuals still get sick.