Feeling spiritually discouraged? This workshop may help

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The Lanteri Center will be celebrating its 15th anniversary this year with a special workshop that could change the course of your life through deeper growth and personal restoration with God.

The Lanteri Center will host the “Overcoming Spiritual Discouragement” seminar Oct. 26-27, which will focus on the life and ministry of Venerable Bruno Lanteri, founder of the Oblates of the Virgin Mary, who lived his spiritual life based on the infinite mercy of God.

The seminar director will be Father Timothy M. Gallagher, O.M.V., who has dedicated many years to an extensive ministry of retreats, spiritual direction and teachings about the spiritual life.

“This seminar is intended for those who wish to engage in an atmosphere of fraternity and evangelical simplicity for a time of study, prayer, and social interaction, learning how to integrate Christian spirituality with their engagement with the world,” Father Greg Cleveland, Director of the Lanteri Center told, the Denver Catholic.

Lanteri preached and wrote about the infinite mercy of the Father manifested in Jesus Christ during difficult times when there was disturbance both in the Church and world. But more than that, he lived it in his everyday life, and taught the Oblates to do the same. Through reconciliation and spiritual direction, he connected with people along their personal journey to knowing God’s mercy. His writings offer hope and spiritual encouragement.

The Lanteri Center for Ignatian Spirituality, located in Denver, was founded in 2004 by Father Ernest Sherstone and Father Dan Barron, both Oblates of the Virgin Mary, a religious community dedicated to retreats and spiritual formation according to the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius.

“We offer spiritual direction to people throughout the Archdiocese of Denver and beyond, as well…We offer that service to people looking for that one-on-one guidance, helping deepen their relationship with The Lord. We also train people to become spiritual directors.”

The Lanteri Center is a place that fosters growth in holiness through the ministry of spiritual direction and prayerful reflection upon God’s Word in a welcoming and friendly environment. Spiritual direction is help given by one Christian to another, which enables that person to listen and respond to God and grow in intimacy with him.

“Engaging in spiritual direction allows the Holy Spirit direct you by moving you deeply and leading you to a closer union with God,” Father Cleveland said.

For more information on the Lanteri Center, visit www.omvusa.org/lanteri-center.

Overcoming Spiritual Discouragement
Oct. 26-27, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Holy Ghost Parish
1900 California St., Denver
$25 each day, lunch provided.

COMING UP: Q&A: How the Office of Child and Youth Protection helps keep kids safe

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Protecting kids should be one of the highest priorities of all youth-serving institutions and organizations. In 2002, following the breakout of a terrible scandal within the Church, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops convened to create the Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People, more commonly known as the Dallas Charter. To learn more about the Dallas Charter, check out this post.

One of the fruits of the Dallas Charter was the requirement that all dioceses in the U.S. create an office specifically for keeping kids safe. In the Archdiocese of Denver, we have the Office of Child and Youth Protection, which has been a key part of our diocese since shortly after the Dallas Charter was implemented. Headed by Christi Sullivan, who has a background in certified child protection training and has worked in the office for eight years, the Office of Child and Youth Protection has trained over 70,000 adults to recognize and report child abuse since 2002, and trains 20,000 to 25,000 kids on how to keep themselves safe each year.

We sat down with Christi to get a better idea of what she and her office do to make sure that the Church is among the safest places possible for children and youth.

Denver Catholic: What is the function of the Office of Child and Youth Protection?

Christi Sullivan: We train adults, children and adolescents to recognize and report possible abuse and neglect. We train between four and five thousand adults every year. In 2003, the first round of adult classes trained approximately 20,000 people. Since then, we have trained 4,000-5,000 adults every year.

Additionally, we train all the facilitators that provide safe environment training for the adults. I have roughly 250 facilitators in the diocese. We supply the curriculum that’s been promulgated by our archbishop and we also train parish staff and administer and maintain a database of 80,000 adults that have been trained since 2003. We also provide support and guidance for the 160+ entities and organizations in the diocese that work diligently to ensure they are safe environment compliant. We are available if they have questions or concerns about curriculum, reporting, background screening, the Code of Conduct or any concern regarding child safety.

DC: What is the process like if somebody has an allegation of abuse?

CS: If somebody has a suspicion of abuse or neglect with a child, at-risk-adult or elder, obviously they contact the authorities immediately. If the person is in imminent danger, they call 911. If it’s not an imminent danger situation, then they need to call 844-CO-4-KIDS for children or the county adult protective services office.

DC: How does your office intervene and assist?

CS: If they’re talking to me, it’s probably potentially a concern with somebody either who’s an employee or volunteer within the archdiocese. So, once the report to the authorities is made, we ask the report is made to us. Then we would follow up, when appropriate, when the authorities have finished their investigation and then we follow through with an investigation and take appropriate action, up to and including termination.
Also, Jim Langley is our victim assistance coordinator. If there’s anybody that just needs to speak to any kind of abuse or neglect situation, he’s available. St. Raphael’s Counseling through Catholic Charities is also available to help people.

DC: What is the process for somebody who wants to be safe environment trained?

CS: Anybody can go to a safe environment training anywhere in the archdiocese — they don’t have to be Catholic. And those are listed on my website, ArchDen.org/child-protection under “Find a Class”. I think right now we have about 20 classes in the next 30 days.

DC: Tell me about the curriculum you use.

CS: We’re going to soon have a new curriculum that’s more updated and current. The curriculum we have now is not irrelevant, the information is still incredibly relevant — Pedophiles have not changed their modus operandi. But the new curriculum is going to expand on that and include things like Internet safety, bullying, suicide awareness and other safety areas of concern for families, parents, mentors and ministries. It will also provide training for reporting at-risk-adult and elder abuse and neglect.

DC: Is this curriculum required in public schools?

CS: Safe environment training is not required in public schools in Colorado. Curriculum is available to public schools and has been for about three years now, but to my knowledge, the only school district that’s picked it up is Adams 12. Aurora public schools just started training teachers this year with their own custom curriculum, but they are not including parents and kids yet as they are still developing curricula for those groups.

DC: So this has been a norm in the Catholic Church and Catholic schools for 17 years.
CS: Yes.

DC: And for all of the other schools in the state, it’s not even required.

CS: No it is not. In 2015, Colorado introduced SB 15-020, a version of what is commonly known as Erin’s Law. The full version of the law was not passed as introduced, which would have required safe environment training for students, teachers and parents. After committee hearings, the final version of the law allowed for a new position of a Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Specialist at the Colorado School Safety Resource Center and a reference booklet listing available curricula has been published, but the version of the law that passed does not require school districts and charter schools to include safe environment curriculum.

To learn more about the Office of Child and Youth Protection and attend a Safe Environment Training, visit archden.org/child-protection.