Fallen away veterans invited back to Church

Sept. 28 Mass and program to be hosted by deacons, Knights at Colorado Freedom Memorial

Roxanne King

The names of 6,200 Coloradans killed or missing in action are listed on the Colorado Freedom Memorial in Aurora. For the first time since the memorial was dedicated in 2013, the site will be blessed during an outdoor Mass for veterans, their families and friends Sept. 28. Auxiliary Bishop Jorge Rodriguez will be the main celebrant of the Mass, which will be concelebrated by other priests of the archdiocese. Deacons will assist.

Click here for the event page.

The event starts at 10:30 a.m. with a short program that includes a performance by the Air Force Academy Cadet Choir and inspiring talks by retired Air Force Gen. Mike Duggan and retired Air Force Sgt. Bill Lancaster. The Knights of Columbus will serve a complimentary lunch after the Mass and tours will be conducted. Master of ceremonies will be Rick Crandall, KEZW-AM morning show host and founder and president of the Colorado Freedom Memorial.

The Mass and program was organized by the deacons of the Archdiocese of Denver to express gratitude to veterans and to help those who may have fallen away from their faith to reconnect with the Church, said Deacon Dave Thompson, who served in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War.

“At the end of that war, veterans were seriously disrespected. It was embarrassing and shameful,” he said. “A lot of veterans have had that experience after other wars since then.”

While the trauma of war can result in deeper faith for some veterans, in others it can lead to loss of faith and/or diminished participation in religious activities, reports the U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs National Center for PTSD.

“I’ve interviewed thousands of veterans over the years. Many of them talk about falling away from their faith because of things they had to see and do in war,” Crandall said. “They think: I’ve done something out of necessity that God is not going to be happy with.

“There’s a bridge that needs to be crossed to bring them back [to God],” added Crandall, who is a convert to Catholicism. “That was the whole idea for this event.”
Mount Tabor Counseling, which offers therapy from a Catholic perspective, will have counselors and contact information available for veterans who may want to speak with one at the event or in the future, Deacon Thompson said.

“We want them to know that if they are suffering, healing is possible through God and the Church,” he said.
Attendees are urged to bring their own lawn chairs or blankets. Some seating will be available for those with disabilities, the organizers said.

The organizers said they have no idea how many people will attend the liturgy and luncheon. It is open to both Catholics and non-Catholics.

“It will be a beautiful celebration,” Crandall said. “We’re trying to make it a wonderful sense of community. Who knows, it could be the first of an annual event to help veterans.”

Outdoor Mass & Program for Veterans

Sept. 28, 10:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Pre-event music starting at 10:30 a.m.
Mass & Program from 11:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Colorado Freedom Memorial,
756 Telluride St., Aurora, CO 80011
Questions? Call 303-715-3198

Featured image courtesy of Colorado Freedom Memorial Facebook page

COMING UP: Q&A: How the Office of Child and Youth Protection helps keep kids safe

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Protecting kids should be one of the highest priorities of all youth-serving institutions and organizations. In 2002, following the breakout of a terrible scandal within the Church, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops convened to create the Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People, more commonly known as the Dallas Charter. To learn more about the Dallas Charter, check out this post.

One of the fruits of the Dallas Charter was the requirement that all dioceses in the U.S. create an office specifically for keeping kids safe. In the Archdiocese of Denver, we have the Office of Child and Youth Protection, which has been a key part of our diocese since shortly after the Dallas Charter was implemented. Headed by Christi Sullivan, who has a background in certified child protection training and has worked in the office for eight years, the Office of Child and Youth Protection has trained over 70,000 adults to recognize and report child abuse since 2002, and trains 20,000 to 25,000 kids on how to keep themselves safe each year.

We sat down with Christi to get a better idea of what she and her office do to make sure that the Church is among the safest places possible for children and youth.

Denver Catholic: What is the function of the Office of Child and Youth Protection?

Christi Sullivan: We train adults, children and adolescents to recognize and report possible abuse and neglect. We train between four and five thousand adults every year. In 2003, the first round of adult classes trained approximately 20,000 people. Since then, we have trained 4,000-5,000 adults every year.

Additionally, we train all the facilitators that provide safe environment training for the adults. I have roughly 250 facilitators in the diocese. We supply the curriculum that’s been promulgated by our archbishop and we also train parish staff and administer and maintain a database of 80,000 adults that have been trained since 2003. We also provide support and guidance for the 160+ entities and organizations in the diocese that work diligently to ensure they are safe environment compliant. We are available if they have questions or concerns about curriculum, reporting, background screening, the Code of Conduct or any concern regarding child safety.

DC: What is the process like if somebody has an allegation of abuse?

CS: If somebody has a suspicion of abuse or neglect with a child, at-risk-adult or elder, obviously they contact the authorities immediately. If the person is in imminent danger, they call 911. If it’s not an imminent danger situation, then they need to call 844-CO-4-KIDS for children or the county adult protective services office.

DC: How does your office intervene and assist?

CS: If they’re talking to me, it’s probably potentially a concern with somebody either who’s an employee or volunteer within the archdiocese. So, once the report to the authorities is made, we ask the report is made to us. Then we would follow up, when appropriate, when the authorities have finished their investigation and then we follow through with an investigation and take appropriate action, up to and including termination.
Also, Jim Langley is our victim assistance coordinator. If there’s anybody that just needs to speak to any kind of abuse or neglect situation, he’s available. St. Raphael’s Counseling through Catholic Charities is also available to help people.

DC: What is the process for somebody who wants to be safe environment trained?

CS: Anybody can go to a safe environment training anywhere in the archdiocese — they don’t have to be Catholic. And those are listed on my website, ArchDen.org/child-protection under “Find a Class”. I think right now we have about 20 classes in the next 30 days.

DC: Tell me about the curriculum you use.

CS: We’re going to soon have a new curriculum that’s more updated and current. The curriculum we have now is not irrelevant, the information is still incredibly relevant — Pedophiles have not changed their modus operandi. But the new curriculum is going to expand on that and include things like Internet safety, bullying, suicide awareness and other safety areas of concern for families, parents, mentors and ministries. It will also provide training for reporting at-risk-adult and elder abuse and neglect.

DC: Is this curriculum required in public schools?

CS: Safe environment training is not required in public schools in Colorado. Curriculum is available to public schools and has been for about three years now, but to my knowledge, the only school district that’s picked it up is Adams 12. Aurora public schools just started training teachers this year with their own custom curriculum, but they are not including parents and kids yet as they are still developing curricula for those groups.

DC: So this has been a norm in the Catholic Church and Catholic schools for 17 years.
CS: Yes.

DC: And for all of the other schools in the state, it’s not even required.

CS: No it is not. In 2015, Colorado introduced SB 15-020, a version of what is commonly known as Erin’s Law. The full version of the law was not passed as introduced, which would have required safe environment training for students, teachers and parents. After committee hearings, the final version of the law allowed for a new position of a Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Specialist at the Colorado School Safety Resource Center and a reference booklet listing available curricula has been published, but the version of the law that passed does not require school districts and charter schools to include safe environment curriculum.

To learn more about the Office of Child and Youth Protection and attend a Safe Environment Training, visit archden.org/child-protection.