Colorado Catholic Conference notes several victories during 2019 Legislative Session

Denver Catholic Staff

The 2019 Legislative Session in Colorado ended earlier this month. There were hundreds of bills introduced and debated this year; some good, some bad and some fell somewhere in between.

“I would like to thank everyone who made their voices heard this Session,” said Jennifer Kraska, Executive Director of the Colorado Catholic Conference. “It is vitally important that your elected officials hear from you, regardless of party affiliation or whether you agree on issues or not; participation in the public square is something all people of good will should take seriously.

It would be a lengthy process to describe every bill the Colorado Catholic Conference worked on during the Legislative Session; Kraska provided a brief summary of some of the legislation and the outcomes.

Comprehensive Human Sexuality Education.
PASSED

“The CCC opposed this legislation.  It underwent drastic changes during the legislative process.  While not great, the final version of the bill did make significant changes by removing many sections that were problematic.”

Colorado Department of Public Safety Human Trafficking-Related Training.
PASSED
“The CCC supported this legislation.  It allows for human trafficking prevention training to be established by the Department of Public Safety.”

Income Tax Deduction for 529 Account K-12 Expenses. POSTPONED INDEFINITELY
“The CCC supported this legislation.  It would have aligned Colorado law with federal law in allow a tax-free distribution for K-12 private school tuition expenses.”

School Immunization Requirement. 
POSTPONED INDEFINITELY
“The CCC monitored this legislation.  This bill would have modernized and updated immunization requirements for school entry to help improve vaccination rates.”

Information to Students Regarding Safe Haven Laws.
PASSED
“The CCC supported this legislation.  This bill will help public schools provide information to students regarding laws that provide for the safe abandonment of newborn children.”

Nonpublic School Teacher Development Programs.
PASSED
“The CCC supported this legislation.  This bill gives nonpublic schools the authority to operate certain teacher development programs.”

Repeal the Death Penalty.
POSTPONED INDEFINITELY
“The CCC supported this legislation.  This bill would have prospectively repealed the death penalty in Colorado.”

COMING UP: Faith and politics in the United States

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Cherished principles of the American revolution include religious freedom and the separation of Church and State. These principles should have benefited Catholics, who sought refuge from the persecution of the formally established Church of England. Catholics, however, could only vote in Pennsylvania and Maryland after the founding of the United States. Despite the original purpose of these principles, they have now falsely come to mean popularly that religion should have no role in public life. Not only did the Founding Fathers not intend this, but the Church also calls us to active engagement in political life by living out our faith in society. A number of books published in the last few years shed light on this call.

Josef Ratzinger/Pope Benedict XVI, Faith and Politics (Ignatius, 2018)

This volume collects a number of distinct writings on the topic of politics from the life of the retired Holy Father. It addresses some of the most foundational elements of society: the relation of personal freedom to truth, how human dignity undergirds law and justice, and how faith gives reason a more expansive view of the goal of human life. Ratzinger explores the relation of faith and politics in the early Church for insights into the problematic secularism that now dominates our political life. In the end, he proposes that society depends upon an ordered freedom that directs government toward the fulfillment of shared goods. We need a genuine freedom that contains “the ability of the conscience to perceive the fundamental values of mankind that concern everyone” (101).

Scalia Speaks: Reflections on Law, Faith, and Life Well Lived (Crown Forum, 2017)

Supreme Court justice Antonin Scalia represented a strong Catholic voice in the public square, though not without controversy. This volume offers a collection of his speeches, dealing not only with law, but also with education, the arts, virtue, and friendship. In his talks touching on faith, he contrasts Jefferson’s supposed sophisticated rejection of miracles with the wisdom of St. Thomas More; encourages us to live a distinct and even weird life in the eyes of the world; exhorts Catholic universities to fidelity; navigates the thorny issue of separation of Church and State; speaks on the importance of going on retreat, and the necessity and limits of faith in public life. He advises: You must . . . not run your spiritual life and worldly life as though they are two separate operations” (147). A Catholic justice, he clarifies, fulfills his office not by seeking to legislate opinion or belief from the bench, but by interpreting the Constitution and the law with integrity and precision. These speeches capture his living voice, in a compelling and accessible manner, which can continue to inspire Catholics to enter public service.

Daniel J. Mahoney, The Idol of Our Age: How the Religion of Humanity Subverts Christianity (Encounter Books, 2018)

Mahoney, a professor at Assumption College, examines the trajectory of politics since the French Revolution and proposes that a humanitarian religion has supplanted the Christian faith and undermined the integrity of local, participatory politics. Favoring an abstract globalism that promotes individual rights and autonomy, “we increasingly despise meditation and the political expression of our humanity. In truth, human beings experience common humanity only in the meeting of diverse human and spiritual affirmations and propositions that arise from the concrete human communities in which we live” (8). This abstraction has also entered the Church, as Christians “increasingly redefine the contents of the faith in broadly humanitarian terms. Christianity is shorn of any recognizable transcendental dimension and becomes an instrument for promoting egalitarian social justice” (13). Mahoney draws upon key thinkers who have pointed to the dangers of humanitarianism — Brownson, Soloviev, Solzhenitsyn, Ratzinger — and the book is worth reading simply as an introduction to their thought. He concludes that in embracing the Church’s rich tradition of faith and reason, we can also return to a genuinely human political life, through “the humanizing discernment made possible by conscience” (124).

Timothy Gordon, Catholic Republic: Why America Will Perish without Rome (Sophia, 2019)

Gordon’s thesis seems to follow Mahoney’s in that Catholic Republic argues that the Catholic faith is necessary for the future of the American republic. Insofar as the flourishing of any republic depends upon an acknowledgement of the truth and virtue for its realization, Gordon’s thesis is correct: The Church can and should help our society to reach its true good. The details of Gordon’s assertion of a crypto-Catholicism underlying the Constitution and American life, however, overplays its hand. He contends that a so-called Catholic Natural Law, the Church’s development of the law of reason accessible to all people, uniquely supplied the vision for American government. In this, I find that Gordon overlooks the unique (and problematic) contributions of the Enlightenment to the American founding, as well as how the Catholic tradition teaches natural law and good politics as natural realities, not something that the Church owns and transmits in an exclusive fashion. While Gordon does note some instances of indirect consultation of Catholic sources, there are too many jumps of assertion that require more detailed explanation and proof. The book would have worked better as an exhortation to approach American politics from a Catholic perspective rather than a largely unproven accusation of plagiarism.