Christmas homilies help visitors see the Church is ‘a good place to be’

Mark Haas

The pews are packed, and the parking lot is like I-25 at rush hour. It’s no secret — Christmas Masses are a bit more crowded than your average Sunday.

“It is a source of great joy,” said Father Tom Coyte, pastor at St. Bernadette in Lakewood. “You want the Church to be full.”

Whether it be college students back home visiting their parents, families that haven’t found the time for Mass in a few months, or just someone who felt moved to attend a Christmas service, priests know they have a chance to reach an expanded audience on Dec. 24 and 25.

“How do you receive them is the question,” said Father Coyte. “What experience are they going to have at church this time, that just might whet their appetite that there is something more here than they realize. That maybe there is something here that they are missing that makes them feel like coming back.”

Simple, and Hopeful

“I think the most important thing is to be positive and welcoming,” said Father David Allen, pastor at Christ on the Mountain in Lakewood. “And to say, ‘We are so glad everyone is here, and it is a wonderful night or day to be together.’

“I try to have a message of hope, and also to try and draw illustrations or analogies that are connected with what they experience in their lives,” said Father Allen. “And try to not make it really complicated on a theological level.”

That’s why Father Allen said he likes to engage the children in the homily, because a simple message can resonate with everyone.

“When you incorporate kids and everyday things, I think that helps, especially with people who are not as familiar with the liturgy,” said Father Allen. “I think they will connect more with the preaching.”

A timeless message 

In preparing for his Christmas homily, Father Chris Uhl, O.M.V., said it’s important to remember the message is not coming from him.

“When you are developing a homily, you are praying about it and asking God to help you and inspire you,” said Father Uhl, pastor at Holy Ghost in Denver.

And even though the story of Christmas is the same every year, Father Uhl said there is never a shortage of themes to talk about.

“I think that is one of the beauties of the Christmas liturgy, that there are so many things that you can draw from,” said Father Uhl. “When you think of Christ coming into the world there are so many ways you can look at a Gospel passage on what happened on Christmas Day.

“You can look at our Blessed Mother, at St. Joseph, you can look at cosmic things happening in the heavens and on earth with angels in the sky. There are themes of rich and poor… there are the Gentiles and the Israelites and the Jewish people that Jesus came to. There are so many things that you can focus on, and very often they are very simple and very beautiful.”

Peace and Love

And even if some of the people won’t be back again for a while, Father Coyte said he hopes the hour at Mass gives them a few moments of peace, and that they leave knowing they are loved by the Heavenly Father.

“We want everyone, whoever they are, to come in the door and feel the general embrace of the Good Shepherd,” said Father Coyte. “Maybe help them to see it is good to take a little time and settle down a little bit, and not be so focused on the business that the world calls us to.

“What we want is for people to say, ‘This is a good place to be.’”

COMING UP: Christmas is More Than You Realize

Sign up for a digital subscription to Denver Catholic!

Ah, Christmastime. The perfect occasion to come together with family and celebrate the birth of our savior with lots of prayer, fellowship, food and conversation.

That last one comes with a caveat, however: As long as the conversation isn’t about politics or religion, you’re safe. While we tend to agree about the politics bit, we take issue with keeping our faith to ourselves, especially on such a central celebration as Christmas. What better time to explain to your skeptical Uncle Tom how there’s a lot more to the Christmas holiday than presents and eggnog?

We all have questions about Christmas. Where did it come from? What’s the history? Why is it when it is? So, we did some research to come up with answers — or, better yet, more questions — in response to some of the things your Uncle Tom thinks he already knows about Christmas.

Don’t be afraid of these conversations! Sometimes they happen because you’ll encounter someone who just wants to argue (the most likely scenario when around family). But we need to be bold and see these conversations as an opportunity to share our heart with someone else. Every single one of these conversations is a chance to engage someone in a meaningful conversation: about life, faith, Christmas, God, and even each other.

So don’t be afraid — keep the conversation going with your friends and family this Christmas season to help them see that the joy of this time of year truly is more than you realize.

What does “Christmas” even mean? 

The word “Christmas” is derived from the Middle English word Cristemasse, which comes from the Old English Cristes Maesse, a phrase which means “Christ’s Mass” and was first recorded in 1038.

Photo Flickr

Over time, it became easier for people to just say “Christmas.” And contrary to popular opinion, the even shorter version, Xmas, doesn’t take “Christ” out of Christmas — the “X” is actually the first letter of the Greek word for Christ (chi). Take that!

Isn’t Christmas just a stolen idea from the ancient pagan celebration of Sol Invictus or New Winter Solstice? 

Not quite. In fact, the earliest reference to Christmas being celebrated on December 25 was by Hippolytus of Rome in his Commentary on the Book of Daniel in 204 A.D., which predates any mention of a celebration honoring the pagan god Sol Invictus.

Photo Flickr

It’s also worth noting that December 25 falls at the time when the ancient world celebrated the winter solstice, which historically has been important for agricultural reasons and therefore an opportune time for different celebrations and rituals by many different peoples and cultures of the era. So, different celebrations around that time were common — no one stole or appropriated anything!

So, why is Christmas celebrated on December 25th?  

Way back in the 5th century, Pope Leo I established the Feast of the Nativity to celebrate the mystery of the Incarnation. Now, this didn’t “create” the Feast Day — we know that many Christians had been celebrating Christmas for centuries before this, too. Rather, just like the dogmas or teachings of the Church on the Eucharist or the Communion of Saints, for example, this was not the invention of a new teaching but the formal articulation of something that was believed from the beginning — in some cases even predating the Bible!

So, why did he settle on this date? It actually goes back to a celebration from even earlier in history: Anno Mundi, the traditional celebration of the Creation of the World. While the date of this celebration was different across many ancient calendars, March 25 emerged as the date of its celebration because of its proximity to the spring equinox. Early Christians also adopted March 25th as the date of the Annunciation, the day when an angel announced to Mary that she was pregnant with Jesus, the savior of the world. How are these dates connected? Because both dates celebrate events when God entered the world: first through the act of Creation and again through the Incarnation. So, nine months after the celebration of this glorious conception, we celebrate Jesus Christ’s birth on Dec. 25. And, once again, that date also aligns with the winter solstice, which marks the time when the days began to grow longer. How fitting that the birth of Christ, the Light coming into the world, coincides with this day of more light.

Wait, so was Jesus even born on December 25, 0 A.D.? 

There’s no way to empirically prove the exact year Jesus was really born. However, there are several curious facts surrounding the day of Dec. 25 that make a strong case that this day was indeed Jesus’ birthday. The first is the Star of Bethlehem, which modern-day astronomers have theorized to possibly be a series of extraordinary astronomical events — specifically, a triple conjunction of Jupiter, Venus, and the star Regulus, which they’ve dated to right around the time Jesus was supposed to have been born. The Wise Men — who really were ancient astrologers — would certainly have paid attention to events like these and followed them closely, right to a little town called Bethlehem! The second detail that helps us date Jesus’ birth accurately is census data. The nativity story in the Gospel of Luke opens with mention of a census taken by Quirinius, the governor of Syria at the time. Historical records verify that a widespread census indeed occurred in 6 A.D., thus adding another layer of historical truth to the story of Jesus’ birth.

Photo Pixabay

Last but not least, the consensus among the early Church Fathers seemed to be that Jesus was born sometime between 3 and 2 B.C. Further, the tradition maintained by several of the Church Fathers is that Jesus was indeed born on Dec. 25. As St. Hippolytus of Rome wrote in his Commentary on Daniel 4:23:3, “the first advent of Our Lord in the flesh, when he was born in Bethlehem, was eight days before the Kalends of January, the fourth day [i.e., Wednesday] … .” The Kalends was the first day of the month, and eight days before January 1st is December 25th. So, while it’s hard to definitively know the exact date of Jesus’ birth, the evidence provided based on historical records and early Church tradition safely points to December 25th as the birthday of Christ. But keep in mind: The actual date he was born is a matter of history, not doctrine. What matters is that he was born!

Is it true that Christmas used to be illegal? 

Yes! Christianity itself was illegal across the Roman empire until the 4th century, and it wasn’t until the 6th century that Emperor Justinian declared Christmas to be a public holiday. But the history gets even crazier. In the United States, Puritans objected to the celebration of Christmas because they felt it to be too unbiblical and rooted in too much lewd partying.

Photo Flickr

Their disapproval went so far that Christmas was totally outlawed in Boston from 1659 until the ban was lifted in 1681. By the signing of the Declaration of Independence in 1776, the celebration of Christmas still was not widespread in the United States. As a matter of fact, even churches were closed during Christmas! Alabama was the first state to declare it a public holiday in 1836, and it wasn’t officially proclaimed a federal holiday until 1870. But today, the holiday is widespread and common — well over 85 percent of the U.S. population celebrates Christmas!

Where does Santa fit in? Also, who’s St. Nicholas and what’s his deal with shoes? 

Photo Pixabay

Santa Claus has been around for a while, but his popularity really increased in the first half of the 20th century, largely due to an ad campaign by Coca-Cola. Santa Claus comes from the Dutch Sinterklass, which translates to St. Nicholas, who was a fourth-century Bishop of Myra. He was born into a super wealthy family and used his inheritance to perform acts of charity. One story tells that he kept a widower from selling his three daughters into prostitution by tossing a bag with golden coins into their home one Christmas night. He did this for several more years, until the widower caught him and discovered it was Bishop Nicholas. Notice the similarities?

Photo Flickr

Oh, it’s also worth mentioning that there is a popular tradition that St. Nick punched a guy in the face at the Council of Nicea in 325 A.D. Seriously, look it up. As for the shoe thing, what can we say — the dude had impeccable fashion sense.

We’ll leave you with a quote from Pope Benedict XVI, from his book Jesus of Nazareth:

Photo Flickr

“What did Jesus actually bring, if not world peace, universal prosperity, and a better world? What has he brought? The answer is very simple: God. He has brought God, and now we know his face, now we can call upon him. Now we know the path that we human beings have to take in this world. Jesus has brought God and with God the truth about our origin and destiny: faith, hope and love. It is only because of our hardness of heart that we think this is too little. Yes indeed, God’s power works quietly in this world, but it is the true and the lasting power. Again and again, God’s cause seems to be in its death throes. Yet over and over again it proves to be the thing that truly endures and saves.”