Centro San Juan Diego has a new director: Alfonso Lara

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The Archdiocese of Denver announced Friday, May 31 the election of Alfonso Lara as the new Director of Centro San Juan Diego.

“I am very happy because I will return to CSJD where I worked for more than 11 years,” Lara told the Denver Catholic. “I will continue to serve the Hispanic community in the same way. I had the pleasure of being present at CSJD since before its dedication, before the building’s renovation, in the year 2002, at the beginning of this dream.”

Lara has served as the Director of Hispanic Evangelization for the Archdiocese of Denver for over a year and will transfer to CSJD in the next two weeks. He is married and has two children. Originally from Obregon, Sonora, Mex., he studied in the diocesan seminary at his birth city in the 90s and moved to the United States in 1999 after discerning his call to marriage. He began working at Annunciation Parish in Denver as director of religious education and youth minister. Before the foundation of CSJD, he was invited by then-Archbishop of Denver Charles Chaput and his assistant bishop Jose Gomez, to form part of the discussion committee for this project.

He began working for the Archdiocese of Denver in 2005 and served at CSJD from 2007-2018 as Director of Pastoral Services. In March 2018, he was named Director of Hispanic Evangelization and transferred to the St. John Paul II Center for the New Evangelization.

Lara will take the place of Juan Carlos Reyes, who passed away March 20. “Juan Carlos was a close friend and very dear to me because I had the opportunity to meet him since he was very young. He did an excellent job during his time at Centro,” Lara said.

He also assured that in his new position, he would like to “continue to research new human development programs; help people in their spiritual and academic needs by treating the person as a whole; assist those who want to become professionals; continue to provide educational programs for adults; direct people to the right resources; all with the goal of helping the person reach their maximum potential, not only in the social realm, but also in the political, economic spheres and in their relationship with God.”

Lara said he hopes his position will soon be replaced by the archdiocese and that “[in CSJD] we will continue to support the needs of this ministry.”

Lastly, the newly elected director of CSJD asked for prayers for this ministry. “I have the pleasure to say that I am going to work with a great group of people, and I trust in divine providence and in the prayers of the people of God. This is a ministry of the Archdiocese of Denver and I am an extension of the Archbishop Aquila’s ministry. When I serve, I do it in name of the Church and not my own,” he said.

CSJD is a ministry within the Archdiocese of Denver that seeks to provide support for the immigrant community by providing courses in English, computer science, free legal assistance, financial education and trainings for small business owners. It also offers college degrees in Spanish, which are valid in the United States, through an agreement with Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla UPAEP.

COMING UP: Machebeuf basketball star traded success playing hoops for a solitary life of prayer

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Shelly Pennefather led the Bishop Machebeuf High School girls’ basketball team to victory in every game she played in. It was not surprising to her friends and classmates that she would go on to play college ball for Villanova and then play professionally in Japan. It was not even surprising that she would have a religious vocation.

What was surprising was the order she chose. In 1991, Shelly Pennefather drove to Alexandria, Va., where she entered the Monastery of the Poor Clares. She would become a cloistered nun, living a radical life that included going barefoot out of penance and poverty and praying all of the hours of the Divine Office, even at 12:30 a.m.

This also meant she would not see her family except for twice a year from behind a transparent screen. She would not hug them until 25 years after her profession.

“I was shocked that she chose a cloistered order,” said Annie Mcbournie, graduate of Machebeuf in 1984 and a friend of Pennefather’s. “I was not at all shocked that she chose a vocation.”

Her story was recently featured on ESPN, who recounted how Pennefather gave up being the highest-paid women’s basketball player in the world in 1991 to live a life in service to the Lord as a Poor Clare.

Pennefather took the name Sister Rose Marie of the Queen of Angels. This past June, Sister Rose Marie celebrated her 25th anniversary of her solemn profession: the long-awaited moment to greet her family from outside the screen, not to happen again for another 25 years.

Villanova teammates, friends, Machebeuf classmates, and family were all in attendance. She hugged her 78-year-old mom for what will probably be the last time.

Mcbournie was not able to make it but will visit Sister Rose Marie this fall. Since she’s kept up with her via letters, she is permitted to visit the monastery.

Pennefather attended Bishop Machebeuf High School in Denver from 1980 to 1983 before transferring for her senior year due to her dad’s military job. She left Machebeuf with a 70-0 record.

“Her entire high school career, she never lost a basketball game,” Mcbournie said.

Mcbournie was a cheerleader and friend of Sister Rose Marie in high school, but a deeper friendship began 10 years after graduation. Sister Rose Marie’s brother Dick called Mcbournie before World Youth Day in Denver in 1993 since Mcbournie was still in the area.

Sister Rose Marie had just joined the Poor Clares and Dick and McBournie met up and spoke about the mourning process the family was going through, McBournie said. Dick mentioned to her that they could write Sister Rose Marie as many letters as they wanted, and one day a year, on the Feast of the Epiphany, she could write back.

Shelly Pennefather, pictured here in this photo from the Archdiocese of Denver archives, always exuded a deep spiritual life, her former Bishop Machebeuf classmates said. (Photo by James Baca)

“From that year on, I have been writing her every year,” McBournie said. She gives Sister Rose Marie updates on life, pictures from their high school reunions, and prayer requests.

“I have witnessed her journey through these letters,” McBournie said.

When Sister Rose Marie’s dad passed away shortly after entering, she was not able to leave the monastery to go to the funeral. McBournie saw how difficult these sacrifices were for her, especially in the early years of her vocation. But the letters show Sister Rose Marie’s joy.

“The last 5 to 10 years, I could just see her say, ‘I’m so blessed to be able to do this’,” McBournie said. “She’s so joyful.”

A fellow Machebeuf classmate asked McBournie for Sister Rose Marie’s address in order to have a little fun. He sent her a $20 bill with a note saying he thought she could use a smoke and a bottle of wine.

Sister Rose Marie did not miss a beat and in her yearly letter, she responded, “I bought incense, and I drank from the chalice,” McBournie recounted.

Shelly Pennefather (#15) had a 70-0 record playing basketball for Bishop Machebeuf in the 1980s, and went on to play for Villanova and then professionally in Japan. (Photo courtesy of Villanova Athletics)

But this letter sparked a friendship. This classmate has continued to write letters and even attended the 25-anniversary jubilee.

“Her letters are still hilarious, still very sarcastic,” McBournie said.

She remembers Sister Rose Marie being reserved and quiet in high school, focused more on school and basketball than anything else. Her father was in the military and the family was very disciplined, but they had a good sense of humor and quick wit, McBournie said.
“Her spirituality permeated her existence from the time she was young,” McBournie said.

David Dominguez was a few years ahead of Sister Rose Marie at Machebeuf but remembers her discipline and her talent. He called himself her cheerleader.’

“If it was really tight, we would start yelling, ‘Shelly, Shelly!’” Dominguez said. “It was one of my favorite cheers.”

Dominguez exercised at the Air Force base gym where Sister Rose Marie would train and play basketball with her dad and brother.

“I knew she had incredible skills,” Dominguez said. “It was kind of magical to watch.”

Sister Rose Marie recently celebrated the 25th anniversary of her profession of vows with the Poor Clares. She was able to hug her friends and family for the first time in 25 years. ESPN was there to cover the occasion. (Photo courtesy of Mary Beth Bonacci)

Dominguez also knew she was different.

“She was living for a different purpose than everyone else,” he said.

Sister Rose Marie’s devotion and personality remain the same, though she has traded in her jersey for a habit.
Although Sister Rose Marie can only write one letter a year, and can seldom have visitors, her friendship and influence reach far beyond the monastery walls.

Mcbournie said that their yearly letters have brought them even closer than they were in high school.

“I look forward to her letter every year,” Mcbournie said.