‘The Church needs your courage,’ pope tells new cardinals

VATICAN CITY (CNA/EWTN News)—During the Feb. 22 morning consistory at which Pope Francis created 19 new cardinals, he urged the prelates gathered in St. Peter’s Basilica to serve the Church fearlessly.

“The Church needs your courage, to proclaim the Gospel at all times, both in season and out of season, and to bear witness to the truth,” the pope emphasized.

St. Peter’s Basilica was filled with nearly 200 members of the College of Cardinals and those who had gathered to witness the event. Francis’ predecessor Benedict XVI joined the other bishops, wearing his customary white garments rather than the red vestments of a cardinal.

Reflecting on the Gospel which was proclaimed at the ceremony, Pope Francis noted that in the Scriptures, “Jesus is often walking and he teaches his disciples along the way. This is important. Jesus did not come to teach a philosophy, an ideology … but rather ‘a way,’ a journey to be undertaken with him.”

“But this is not easy, or comfortable, because the way that Jesus chooses is the way of the cross,” he acknowledged.

Unlike the disciples before the resurrection who were “shocked” and “full of fear,” said the pontiff, “we know that Jesus has won, and that we need not fear the cross; indeed the cross is our hope.”

“And yet, we are all too human, sinners, tempted to think as men do, not as God does.”

Giving into such a “worldly mentality” of fear, however, results in “rivalry, jealousy, factions,” said the pope.

He emphasized to the cardinals that the Church needs “your cooperation, and even more your communion, communion with me and among yourselves.”

“Brothers, let us allow Jesus to call us to himself!” he urged.

“And let us listen to him, with the joy that comes from receiving his word together, from letting ourselves be taught by that word and by the Holy Spirit, and to become ever more of one heart and soul, gathered around him.”

The “proclamation of the word” is one of the “primary tasks” of a bishop, noted the pope. Another primary task is prayer for “Christ’s flock.”

“We want to express our spiritual closeness to the ecclesial communities and to all Christians suffering from discrimination and persecution. The Church needs our prayer for them, that they may be firm in faith and capable of responding to evil with good.”

“This prayer of ours extends to every man and women suffering injustice on account of their religious convictions,” he added. “Let us therefore invoke peace and reconciliation for those peoples presently experiencing violence, destruction, and war.”

Pope Francis concluded his remarks by thanking the cardinals and encouraging them to “walk together behind the Lord.”

He then continued the ceremony, reading the formula for the creation of new cardinals, followed by the names of each of the 19 men. The College of Cardinals said the creed together, pledging their fidelity and obedience to the pope and his successors.

Each of the new cardinals knelt before the pope to exchange the sign of peace and receive their assignment of a church in Rome—a sign of their participation in the pope’s pastoral care. They were also given the zucchetto, the tri-fold hat called a “biretta,” and the ring of a cardinal.

With the new cardinals, there are now 218 total living cardinals of whom 122 are under 80 years of age and thus eligible to vote in a conclave.

One of the new cardinals, the elderly Italian Archbishop Loris Francesco Capovilla, was not present. The 98-year-old is the former secretary of Pope John XXIII and one of the longest-serving archbishops. In the next few days, the cardinal’s hat will be delivered to him in the town where he resides in the north of Italy.

The 18 new cardinals were scheduled to receive visitors during a reception Saturday afternoon in the Vatican’s Apostolic Palace and Paul VI Hall.

Cardinals

Here is the list of the new cardinals:

— Italian Archbishop Pietro Parolin, Vatican secretary of state

— Italian Archbishop Lorenzo Baldisseri, general secretary of the Synod of Bishops

— German Archbishop Gerhard Muller, prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith

— Italian Archbishop Beniamino Stella, prefect of the Congregation for Clergy

— English Archbishop Vincent Nichols of Westminster

— Nicaraguan Archbishop Leopoldo Brenes Solorzano of Managua

— Canadian Archbishop Gerald Lacroix of Quebec

— Ivorian Archbishop Jean-Pierre Kutwa of Abidjan, Ivory Coast

— Brazilian Archbishop Orani Tempesta of Rio de Janeiro

— Italian Archbishop Gualtiero Bassetti of Perguia-Citta della Pieve

— Argentine Archbishop Mario Poli of Buenos Aires

— Korean Archbishop Andrew Yeom Soo-jung of Seoul

— Chilean Archbishop Ricardo Ezzati Andrello of Santiago

— Burkina Faso Archbishop Philippe Ouedraogo of Ouagadougou

— Philippine Archbishop Orlando Quevedo of Cotabato

— Haitian Bishop Chibly Langlois of Les Cayes

— Italian Archbishop Capovilla

— Spanish Archbishop Fernando Sebastian Aguilar, retired, of Pamplona

— St. Lucian Archbishop Kelvin Felix, retired, of Castries

COMING UP: Team Samaritan cyclist goes ‘Everesting’ for the homeless and hungry

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When it comes to the daily sufferings of those who are homeless, there’s nothing like a 29,029-foot bike ride to keep things in perspective.

That’s exactly what Corbin Clement will be doing this Saturday, June 19, with a couple of his riding buddies as they attempt an “Everesting” ride to raise money for the Samaritan House homeless shelter in Denver. Starting at Witter Gulch Road in Evergreen, the three riders will climb Squaw Pass Road to a point in Clear Creek County and ride back down the hill for over eight laps, which amounts to roughly 190 miles in distance and the equivalent of the elevation of Mt. Everest in terms of vertical climbing – hence the name “Everesting.” Their goal is to complete the feat in 20 hours or less.

Oh, and they can’t sleep. It is, indeed, just as crazy as it sounds. Those who aren’t avid cyclists might be wondering, “How in the world do you train for something like this?” 
 
“For training, it’s been just more or less ride as much as possible,” Clement told the Denver Catholic. “The training is structured around endurance, and that’s of course what Everesting is. It’s just a lot of peddling. So, a lot of my training so far has just been trying to ride as much as possible and ride longer high elevation rides.” 

In March, an Irish cyclist set the world record for Everesting when he completed the feat in six hours and 40 minutes. Clement isn’t trying to set a record, but regardless, it’s quite a feat to undertake, even for a seasoned athlete like him, whose pedigree includes snowboarding and rock climbing. 

“Our ride will be the same thing, but it’ll be pretty different,” Clement said. “We don’t have any sort of special bikes or super focused diet or a really regimented plan or a crew that’s very well-instructed on how we’re going to tackle this. I’ve read a couple of things to just kind of make it into a party — have friends come out to support you, get people to join you on certain laps…that’s kind of the approach we’re taking.” 

Clement has already raised $5,200 for Samaritan House, with a current goal of $8,000. This is Clement’s first year riding for Team Samaritan, but his dad, Kevin, has ridden for the team for several years. When his dad offered to give him an extra kit and uniform, Clement accepted, but didn’t want to take it without doing something help the cause. He could’ve simply opted for a nice ride in the countryside, but he chose to do something a bit more challenging.  

Corbin Clement used to experience the challenges that homeless people face on a daily basis when commuting through downtown Denver to work on his bike. This Saturday, he will raise money for Samaritan House homeless shelter by “Everesting,” a 190-mile bike ride that is the equivalent of the elevation of Mt. Everest in terms of vertical climbing. (Photo provided)

“For some reason, the Everesting idea popped into my head,” he explained. “I think it’s one of those things that has a little bit of shock value for people who hear about it. It’s certainly something that’s gained more popularity and visibility in the last couple of years with endurance athletes. I wanted to choose something that would actually be a challenge for myself and something that I’d have to work towards.” 

Clement currently resides in Utah, but he used to live in Denver and commute by bike to work every day. During those rides to his office, which was located near Samaritan House, he would pass many homeless people and have conversations with them. This experience was also a motivating factor for his Everesting attempt for Team Samaritan. 

“It’s very different when you’re on a bike versus in a car because you’re right there,” Clement said. “If you stop at a stoplight and a homeless person is on the corner, whether or not they’re panhandling or something like that, you hear the conversations, or you’ll have a conversation with them. There are things you smell or you hear or you see that you just never would if you were in a car. So, it kind of made sense, too, with the biking aspect. It’s part of my community that I’ve lived and worked in for a very long time.” 

Clement’s Everesting attempt is one event in a series of endurance event’s he’s doing over the summer that culminates with the Leadville 100, a single-day mountain bike race across the Colorado Rockies. In that race, he will be riding to support young adults diagnosed with cancer by raising funds for First Descents.  

Both causes are near to Clement’s heart, and he said that while his Everesting attempt will be a form of “suffering,” it pales in comparison to what the homeless face day in and day out. This is ultimately why he’s riding and raising funds for Team Samaritan. 

“Any time we see a homeless person or people who have to live on the streets,” Clement said, “That is true suffering — true endurance — with no end in sight.” 

To learn more about Corbin’s fundraising efforts or to donate, click here.