Brett Kavanaugh nominated to U.S. Supreme Court

Catholic News Agency

.- President Donald Trump announced Monday night he is nominating Justice Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court to fill the vacancy created when Justice Anthony Kennedy announced his retirement June 27.

In a brief speech after the announcement, Kavanaugh spoke about the importance of his Catholic upbringing and how it has affected his career.

The July 9 announcement came after much speculation over how Trump will choose to shape the Supreme Court during his first term. This is the second vacancy he has filled; previously, he appointed Justice Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court.

Confirmation hearings are expected to begin shortly in the Senate.

Trump said that Kavanaugh “has devoted his life to public service.”

After being introduced, Kavanaugh said he is “deeply honored” to be nominated.

“The motto of my Jesuit high school was ‘men for others’,” said Kavanaugh, who graduated from Georgetown Preparatory School near Washington, D.C. “I have tried to live that creed.”

“I am part of the vibrant Catholic community in the D.C. area,” he said at his nomination. “The members of that community disagree about many things, but we are united in our commitment to serve.”

Kavanaugh highlighted his commitment to service, both in and out of the courtroom. He volunteers serving meals to the homeless, coaching his daughter’s basketball team, and tutoring at an elementary school.

He made special mention of Msgr. John Enzler, President and CEO of Catholic Charities, who was present at the announcement.

“40 years ago, I was an altar boy for Fr. John,” said Kavanaugh, adding that they now serve the homeless together through his work with Catholic Charities.

Kavanaugh currently serves on the DC Circuit Court of Appeals, and has done so since 2006. Previously, he worked in the George W. Bush White House.

Bush said that Kavanaugh “is a brilliant jurist who has faithfully applied the Constitution and laws throughout his 12 years on the D.C. Circuit. He is a fine husband, father, and friend — a man of the highest integrity.”

Kavanaugh clerked for Justice Kennedy.

He received his undergraduate and law degrees from Yale University. He and his wife, Ashley, have two daughters.

On abortion, not much is known regarding his personal views. Kavanaugh recently wrote a decision that prevented a pregnant undocumented minor in federal custody from receiving an abortion. The decision was overturned by another court.

Kavanaugh has written dissents in the past opposing undocumented persons voting in union elections and was opposed to expanding visas to foreign workers when there were Americans who could do the job.

His 2015 ruling on the HHS contraception mandate was met with a mixed response. While he sided with Priests for Life in their case against the Obama administration, he appeared to acknowledge a “compelling” interest in the availability of government-provided contraception, which had previously been recognized by members of the Supreme Court.

In a case involving the Washington Metro’s prohibition on religious-themed advertisements, including an ad by the Archdiocese of Washington, Kavanaugh was “unrelenting” in his questioning of the Metro’s lawyer, saying that he believed the prohibition was “discriminatory.”

Featured image by Chip Somodevilla | Getty Images

COMING UP: Adopt-a-Student program changes family’s life

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When Colin and Maria Coleman moved to the United States, they were certain of one thing.

“We really wanted our child to attend a Catholic school,” said Maria, “but found the cost of tuition beyond our financial means.”

When the family heard about the Seeds of Hope Adopt-a-Student program through St. Catherine of Siena Parish, they decided to apply for their son Justin.

“As practicing Catholics, we see it as vital to pass on a Christ-centered education to our children,” said Colin.

The Colemans put their Catholic faith at the forefront of their lives. Maria is a teacher and Colin is a deacon, both at St. Catherine of Siena. Justin is a sixth grader at the parish school.

“The scholarship is of great importance because, as a missionary family, we work on a very tight budget,” said Colin.

Justin was accepted into the Adopt-a-Student program, which pairs a scholarship donor with a student who, with the financial help, is able to attend Catholic school.

“I feel happy to know someone cares about me and my education,” said Justin.

Through the program, Justin has been able to meet his sponsor and he keeps in touch by sending cards during Christmas and Easter.

The generosity of a donor isn’t lost on students like Justin, who are eager to grow in faith and virtue at the school they love.

“Going to St. Catherine’s has helped my faith life because I get to attend Mass twice a week, sometimes the [priests] have come into class to teach us about God, [and] my teachers also share their faith with me,” said Justin.

Justin is grateful for the faith-filled experiences he’s had, including reenacting the Stations of the Cross and reading the Gospel at school Masses.

“All of these are things I would only have experienced at a Catholic school,” he said.

Colin and Maria are grateful for how welcomed they’ve felt at St. Catherine since moving to the United States.

“It has been and continues to be such a privilege to be so connected to St. Catherine’s,” said Maria. “Our extended family is all in New Zealand, so St. Catherine’s is really a big part of our USA family, as well as the Community of the Beatitudes that we are members of.”

Justin’s scholarship is another key reason for their gratitude.

“We are tremendously grateful to our donor who provides Justin’s scholarship,” said Maria. “We keep Justin’s donor in our prayers and give thanks to God for his wonderful providence.”

Colin agreed.

“I think it is a great witness that someone has taken a personal interest to help in a child’s education,” he said.