Here are beautiful centers for your next retreat

Therese Bussen

Advent is a typically noisy and busy season — which means it’s all the more beneficial to step away from the hustle and reflect on God and renew a relationship with him.

A retreat is a great opportunity to do so, and there are plenty of places in Colorado that offer guided and private retreats for either groups or individuals year-round.

“Advent is a wonderful time of year to prepare our hearts for two joys: Christ’s humble “first coming” in a Bethlehem stable, and His glorious Second Coming at the end of time,” said Father Scott Bailey.

“As a time of preparation for that joy, I highly recommend taking some time for extra prayer and retreat,” he added. “The commercialization (and noise) of Christmas can tend to draw us away from the quiet and simple joy that the Lord wants to give us. Entering into the silence of prayer during Advent, then, can help to dispose us to the graces and presence which is the heart of the Christmas.”

Below is a list of retreat centers available in northern Colorado, as well as Colorado Springs, that are available.

Some are specifically centers for individuals or couples to make personal retreats and others offer guided retreats during the year; others do a mix of both.

Northern Colorado area

 

 

 

 

 

 


Jesus Our Hope
http://www.jesus-our-hope.org/

Nestled in Jefferson County near Littleton, Jesus Our Hope us a hermitage home run by the Community of the Beatitudes. It has a full kitchen, 4 rooms, 3 bathrooms and a chapel with the Blessed Sacrament. It’s surrounded by beautiful mountain landscape and there’s no internet, so it makes for a wonderful retreat setting. Most people use it for personal retreats, but it has a meeting room for 20 people, so it’s an ideal location for a one-day retreat. For more information, visit jesus-our-hope.org/faq, or email jesusourhoperetreat@gmail.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sacred Heart Retreat House –
http://www.sacredheartretreat.org/

An apostolate of the Jesuits of the Central and Southern Province, this retreat house offers guided retreats throughout the year as well as of space for individuals to make private retreats, and is open to religious, priests or laity. Located near Conifer, the center offers comfortable furnishings and beautiful architecture. There is also a kitchen that serves food cafeteria style and complimentary snacks and beverages are always available in the dining room. For more information, visit sacredheartretreat.org.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Mother Cabrini Shrine –
http://www.mothercabrinishrine.org/retreats

At the time it was established by Mother Cabrini in 1912, it was an orphanage for girls. Now, it’s a shrine that offers numerous, beautiful spaces for group or individual retreats, both overnight and day-long. There are daily Masses, a full kitchen and dining room that serves meals, as well as a gift shop. The grounds also offer several places for meditative walks where St. Cabrini herself prayed. For more information or to book a retreat, visit mothercabrinishrine.org.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Abbey of St. Walburga –
http://www.walburga.org/index.php/170/140/

The Abbey Retreat House is a ministry of the Benedictine nuns of the Abbey of St. Walburga who provide retreat space to both individuals or groups. With single bedrooms that have private bathrooms, the house offers continental breakfast, lunch and dinner served in the guest dining room. Visitors are also welcome to pray the Divine Office with the sisters, as well as participate in daily Mass. Make reservations early, this center tends to fill quickly. For more information or to make reservations, visit walburga.org/index.php/170/140 or send an email to aswretreats@gmail.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Lanteri Center for Ignatian Spirituality (Parish retreats) –
 https://www.omvusa.org/lanteri-center/

The Lanteri Center for Ignatian Spirituality offers retreats for parishes on Ignatian spirituality, including Ignatian prayer, the Examen prayer, discernment of spirits and discerning God’s will. For more information, visit omvusa.org/lanteri-center/parish-retreats or contact at omvusa.org/lanteri-center/about-us/contact-us.

Colorado Springs

 

 

 

 

 

 


Franciscan Retreat Center –
http://www.franciscanretreatcenter.org/index.html

The Franciscan Retreat Center, located in the foothills of Colorado Springs, is a space available for personal retreats, group gatherings or other special events. It has 34 overnight guest rooms and 8 meeting areas as well as acres of natural grounds. Daily Mass is available, as well as spiritual direction for a small fee. For more information, visit franciscanretreatcenter.org/index.html.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Benet Hill Monastery –
http://www.benethillmonastery.org/retreats

Benet Hill Monastery is run by the Benedictine sisters of Benet Hill and offers both private and directed retreats for individuals as well as space for retreat groups to come on their own. Located halfway between Castle Rock and Colorado Springs, the retreat center is situated on 44 acres in Black Forest. There is also hermitages available for an experience of solitude, and spiritual direction is available for a fee. Retreatants are also invited to participate in the sisters’ Divine Office. For more information, visit benethillmonastery.org/retreats .

 

 

 

 

 

 


El Tesoro de los Angeles –
http://eltesororetreat.org/

Located in Woodland Park within the Pike National Forest, El Tesoro de los Angeles is a retreat center for individuals, groups and parishes and has a chapel blessed by Bishop Michael J. Sheridan of Colorado Springs. Retreatants must bring their own food and priest if they desire Mass for their retreat or for spiritual direction. For more information, visit eltesororetreat.org/.

Beautiful places out of state

For a list of a few destination retreat centers, check out this list from Aleteia!

12 Catholic retreats held in the most beautiful settings

COMING UP: The Vatican’s Choice: Jimmy Lai or Xi Jinping?

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In mid-May, Chinese leader Xi Jinping unveiled a plan to bypass Hong Kong’s legislature and impose draconian new “national security” laws on the former British colony. Putatively intended to defend Hong Kong from “secessionists,” “terrorists,” and “foreign influence,” these new measures are in fact designed to curb the brave men and women of Hong Kong’s vibrant pro-democracy movement, who have been aggravating the Beijing totalitarians for a long time. With the world distracted by the Wuhan virus (which the Chinese government’s clumsiness and prevarication did much to globalize), the ever-more-brutal Xi Jinping regime evidently thinks that this is the moment to crack down even harder on those in Hong Kong who cherish freedom and try to defend it.

This latest display of Beijing’s intent to enforce communist power in Hong Kong coincides with the most recent persecution of my friend, Jimmy Lai.

Jimmy and I have only met once. But I have long felt a kinship with this fellow-Catholic, a convert who first put his considerable wealth to work in support of important Catholic activities and who is now risking all in support of the pro-democracy movement in Kong Kong. Arrested in February, and then again in April, Jimmy Lai has been charged with helping organize and lead “unauthorized protests.” That he was in the front ranks of pro-democracy demonstrations is true. The question is, why do the Chinese communists regard peaceful protest in support of freedoms Beijing solemnly promised to protect as treasonous?

In late May, the thugs in Beijing tightened the ratchet of repression another notch: Jimmy Lai’s case was transferred to a court that could give the 72-year old a five-year sentence, or even consecutive sentences. But what else could be expected from a regime that was already trying to bankrupt Lai’s pro-democracy newspaper, Apple Daily, by pressuring both Chinese and international firms to stop buying advertising space there? Shamefully, far too many have kowtowed to those pressures, and a recent Wall Street Journal op-ed article reported that Apple Daily is now cut off from 65% of the Hong Kong advertising market. Meanwhile, Beijing, while trying to reassure the business community that everything will be just fine, warns business leaders (as well as diplomats and journalists) not to “join the anti-China forces in stigmatizing or demonizing” the new national security laws.

The Xi Jinping regime may be less stable than it wants the world to think it is. Secure regimes do not increase repression, as Beijing has done for several years now. Moreover, labeling all criticism of the Xi Jinping government as “anti-China” is not the play a regime confident about its legitimacy and stability would make. Such tactics seem clumsy; they bespeak sweaty nervousness, not calm self-assurance.

The attempt to break the Hong Kong democracy movement is one facet of a broader campaign of repression that has not spared Chinese religious communities on the mainland. One million Muslim Uyghurs remain penned in Xinjiang concentration camps, where they are being “educated.” Protestant house churches are under constant threat. And repressive measures continue to be taken against Catholics and their churches, despite the almost two-year old (and still secret) agreement between the Holy See and Beijing. That agreement, which gave the Chinese communist party a lead role in the nomination of bishops, looks ever more like one in which the Vatican gave away a great deal in return for hollow promises; Chinese Catholics who do not toe the party line as the Chinese communist party defines that line are still persecuted. The effects of this sorry affair on the Church’s evangelical mission in the China of the future – hopefully, a post-communist China – will not be positive.

Around the world, voices have been raised in support of Hong Kong’s brave pro-democracy demonstrators. Has the Holy See’s voice been heard? If so, I missed it and so did many others. Are strong representations in favor of religious freedom and other basic human rights being made by Vatican officials behind the scenes in Beijing and Rome? One might hope so. But if the Holy See’s current China policy is in fact a reprise of its failed Ostpolitik in central and eastern Europe during the 1970s, those representations are more likely tepid and wholly ineffectual.

With one of its most courageous Catholic sons now in the dock and facing what could be life-threatening imprisonment, the Vatican now faces a defining choice: Jimmy Lai or Xi Jinping?