Archdiocese of Denver youth invited to a life-changing experience at the NCYC

Avatar

Youth of the Archdiocese of Denver are invited to join 25,000 other Catholic teens from around the country for an amazing opportunity to encounter Jesus Christ and his church in new ways.

The National Catholic Youth Conference (NCYC) is the largest celebration of Catholic youth in the United States. The NCYC is organized by the National Federation for Catholic Youth Ministry (NFCYM), which is made up of diocesan leaders and collaboration members from across the country. This celebration will be held at the Lucas Oil Stadium and the Indianapolis Convention Center in downtown Indianapolis, Ind. November 21-24.

Teens will have the chance to be empowered to become better disciples and be part of a wonderful experience in the young Church.

The 2019 NCYC theme is “Blessed-Broken-Given,” with a schedule that includes general and concurrent sessions addressing a wide variety of topics including forgiveness, Catholic spirituality and prayer, global issues, sexuality, and leadership.

There will be five general sessions which include nationally-known speakers that will motivate teenagers by sharing powerful and challenging messages of hope, Mass on Saturday evening, one general session each morning and one each night. In between general sessions, there will be rounds of workshops, an interactive thematic park for hands-on experiences, concerts, service projects, daily mass, adoration, reconciliation, and time to meet other participants from different parishes around the country.

Teens will be motivated by national speakers sharing powerful and challenging messages of hope, including Katie Prejean McGrady, author of Follow and Room 24.

NCYC is intended for high school teens and participants must be at least freshmen to attend. Each teen must register with a parish or school.

The Archdiocese of Denver is looking for teenagers that are interested and willing to take part of this life-changing event. The group will depart from Denver International Airport on November 21 and return on November 24.

If you are interested in joining our group, please contact the Office of Evangelization & Family Life Ministries at 303-715-3178 or visit archden.org/eflm/ncyc/.

COMING UP: Ms. Taylor: St. Louis’ fourth grade founder

Sign up for a digital subscription to Denver Catholic!

The following interview was conducted by the eighth grade class of 2020 at St. Louis Catholic School in Louisville to honor Ms. Lydia Taylor, the school’s beloved fourth grade teacher who is retiring after 20 years of teaching at St. Louis.

Our beloved fourth grade teacher, Ms. Taylor, has been working at St. Louis for over 20 years. As such, she has plenty of experience teaching in a Catholic environment. Since she is retiring this year, the 8th grade class at St. Louis decided to interview her and find out about Ms. Taylor. These are just a few of the many answers we received from her.

What are some things you wish more people understood about teaching in a Catholic School?

“I feel like we address the whole person… and [teach] life skills that can be carried on into their grown-up lives.”

Ms. Taylor feels that in Catholic schools, children receive an education that is applicable in all aspects of life, not just the academic portion. Catholic school teachers help children with social skills and independence among other skills. At public schools, teachers don’t get to know their students on a personal level, unlike Catholic schools. A personal connection with their students allows teachers to educate them on important life matters. Our Catholic faith and morals also allow our teachers to help students without having to worry about offending or insulting them.

What will you miss most about teaching at St. Louis?

“I’m going to miss the students for sure, and I’m actually going to miss the parents. I have had a lot of friendships over the years… A lot of my teaching friends have left before me, but I still keep in touch with them.”

Since Ms. Taylor was hired at St. Louis three days before the school year started, her room was a mess, and she wasn’t going to be able to clean it up in time. The parents at St. Louis saw how worried she was and stepped in to help by cleaning her room and organizing her lesson plan. She says she has met some truly incredible people here at St. Louis.

How would you like to spend your summers when you leave St. Louis?

“I think I’m going to move back East and vacation here in the summers… When I became a teacher, I thought I would have the summers to write, but I don’t, so I will probably catch up on my writing when I retire.”

Ms. Taylor has a passion for writing and even used to be a newspaper reporter. Her passion to write is still strong, and she hopes to do plenty of it when she retires.

Ms. Taylor with the eight grade class of 2020 at St. Louis. (Photos provided)

What accomplishments fill you with pride over the last 20 years at St. Louis?

“Having student teachers come back. I enjoy having my students come back wanting to pursue a job as a teacher.”

Ms. Taylor feels that she did her job properly when she inspires her students so much that they come back asking for assistance so that they can be just like her. She also enjoys hearing from students who have graduated and she can see what they are up to and how she impacted their lives.

Is there a quote/ saying that you live your life by?

“Be the change you want to see in the world.” – Gandhi

Ms. Taylor believes that if you want to improve the world, you will have to set a good example of how we should treat each other and how we should live our lives. Ms. Taylor sets a good example for her children in hopes that they will go out and set a good example for the rest of the world.

If you could pass on any wisdom to your students, what would you share?

“Don’t sweat the small stuff,” Ms. Taylor believes.

She thinks that people shouldn’t worry as much about the minor issues in life but focus on the things that are more important.

What would students be surprised to find out about you?

“This is kind of embarrassing, but I was actually in the Mrs. Massachusetts pageant… It was great for all my friends because they got to watch me up on the stage, but for me, it was like, “What do we do now?” and “Why am I doing this?”

Ms. Taylor also brought in a picture of a quilt she made with her class one year, which hung in the capitol building for one month. The whole class received official certificates of their work from the quilt, and the quilt sold for $2,000 at our school’s Gala.

Ms. Taylor is an incredible teacher and has been here for her students for over 20 years. We wish her luck in her further adventures and will always remember her here at St. Louis as an amazing teacher and friend.