A Man of His Word: New documentary gives personal glimpse into Pope Francis’ pontificate

How can the name and works of St. Francis of Assisi, one of the greatest and most inspiring saints, be performed in the 21st century? How is the Church called to address the signs of the times, develop its message without losing the essence of the teachings of Jesus, who is the same yesterday, today and always?

We’re in the midst of Pope Francis’ sixth year of pontificate – the first Latin-American pope, the first Jesuit and the first to choose his name after Assisi’s 12th-century saint, whom Christ called to reform his Church.

The documentary titled Pope Francis: A Man of His Word, which opened May 18, makes the pontiff’s human side and closeness visible, featuring the most striking images of his pontificate – his trips, audiences, main lectures and gestures of closeness to the people – in an interview with filmmaker Wim Wenders.

During the interview, the pope responds to questions regarding the environment, workers’ rights, family, the importance of parents’ walk with their children, the sins that shame the Church (as sexual abuse to minors by clergy), the need to live in simplicity and evangelical poverty, and the importance of prayer, among other aspects of relevance that are not foreign to the concerns the Church.

This interview makes Pope Francis a man of closeness that worries about each of the faithful in the Church. His care for the millions of men and women around the world, including those who don’t profess the Catholic faith but let themselves be influenced by his message, is also made clear.

A Man of His Word gives the impression that the pope is talking to you face-to-face, with a tired but lucid demeanor, with a thoughtful smile, sharing with you the joy of living the Gospel and encouraging you with simple words to live according to your faith.

The images in the documentary, which highlight his trips, lectures, homilies and audiences, pair excellently the striking words of the pontiff with the reactions of joy, surprise and fervor in the faces of those who listen and receive him throughout the world. The documentary, thus, compiles diverse trips to countries such as Brazil, the United States, Italy, Israel, the Central African Republic, the Philippines, Portugal and Bolivia.

Perhaps due to a lack of time, this production falls short in a few topics. It would have been great if the pope emphasized documents such as his apostolic exhortation Evangelii Gaudium, which is today an invaluable guide for many projects of evangelization around the world. The viewer could be led to think that the encyclical Laudato Si – on the care of our common home – is the only valuable document he has written.

Even then, I highly recommend it to everyone: to Catholics who admire and follow the pontiff and to people from other denominations who want to learn from this great leader, from his simple and wise words, from this pope who came “from the ends of the world,” showing always a human countenance, delving into the teachings of the Gospel and trying to bring to life those words he said to more than a hundred journalists at the beginning of his pontificate: “How I would like a Church that is poor and for the poor!”

COMING UP: Read Archbishop Aquila’s letter in response to the Pennsylvania Grand Jury Report

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The following letter written by Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila in response to the Pennsylvania Grand Jury report was read at all weekend Masses Aug. 17-18.

18 August 2018

My dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,

I write to you today with great sadness to respond to yet another scandal that has shaken the Church. Even though many of the details in the Grand Jury Report in Pennsylvania had already been reported, the full release was still undeniably shocking and its contents devasting to read. We face the undeniable fact that the Church has gone through a dark and shameful time, and while a clear majority of the Report addresses incidents occurring 20+ years in the past, we know that sin has a lasting impact and amends need to be made.

Many children have suffered from cruel behavior for which they bore no responsibility. I offer my apology for any way that the Church, its cardinals, bishops, priests, deacons, or laity have failed to live up to Jesus’ call to holiness. I especially offer this apology to the survivors, for the past abuses and for those who knowingly allowed the abuse to occur. I also apologize to the clergy who have been faithful and are deeply discouraged by these reports.

Everyone has the right to experience the natural feelings of grief as they react to this trauma – shock; denial; anger; bargaining; and depression. I want you to know I feel those emotions as well – especially anger. I believe the best way to recover is a return to God’s plan for human sexuality. In response to the Archbishop McCarrick revelations, I have written at length about the spiritual battle we are facing. That letter can be found on the archdiocese’s home page – archden.org.

I ask everyone to pray for the Church in Pennsylvania, though these dioceses over the last 20 years have greatly evolved from how they are described in the Grand Jury Report, the Church must face its past sins with great patience, responsibility, repentance and conversion.

Creating an environment where children are safe from abuse remains a top priority in the Archdiocese of Denver. In our archdiocese, we require background checks and Safe Environment Training for all priests, deacons, employees, and any volunteers who are around children. During this training, everyone is taught their role as a mandatory reporter, and what steps to follow if they witness or even suspect abuse. We also require instruction for children and young people, where they are taught about safe and appropriate boundaries, and to tell a trusted adult if they ever feel uncomfortable. We participate in regular independent audits of our practices, and we have been found in compliance every year since the national audit began in 2003.

Finally, while we have made strides to improve our Archdiocese, I am aware that the wounds of past transgressions remain. We are committed to helping victims of abuse and we are willing to meet with anyone who believes they have been mistreated.

I urge all of us to pray for holiness, for the virtues, and for a deeper relationship with Jesus Christ. Only he and he alone can heal us, forgive us, and bring us to the Father. Be assured of my prayers for all of you and most especially the victims of any type of sexual abuse committed by anyone.

Sincerely yours in Christ,
Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila