In the wake of Vegas shooting, prayers still matter

So I hear that Jimmy Kimmel doesn’t want our prayers.

Well, not exactly. But he did, in a very emotional monologue, decry politicians who offered their “insufficient” prayers, saying they should instead pray for forgiveness regarding their inaction on gun control.

One one level, I understand his frustration. Las Vegas is his home town. I know from my Columbine experience that when attacks hit close to home, the horror becomes more real. It feels personal.  And Kimmel, like the rest of us, wants to do something, to keep this from ever happening again.

My purpose here isn’t to wade into the gun debate. Rather, I want look at the prayer side of Kimmel’s monologue.  Because I suspect many of us are feeling the same way.  “Our prayers don’t seem to be helping.”

But are they?  Is prayer just another failed tactic?  If we are asking “Have our prayers stopped the violence?” then obviously they haven’t.  It continues.

But making that the only gauge of “successful” prayer misses the point of who God is.

Of course, I could no more explain God and the mystery of suffering than I could manufacture a mountain range.  But I do know what God has revealed about Himself to us in Scripture.

I know that He hates evil.  He hates the destruction of innocent life.  And the man (or woman) who destroys innocent life will face His judgment.  But He gives us free will, which we can use for good or for evil. And ever since Adam and Eve used it to defy Him, evil has been let loose into the world.  And the God Who loves us and intervenes in human history does not always intervene to prevent it.  He in fact didn’t prevent the physical evil perpetrated against His own Son.

Why?  We can’t fully know.  His ways are above our ways. He sees this world through the lens of eternity.  We are all destined to die, whether in our beds at a ripe old age, or at a Jason Aldean concert in our prime.  It is evil for one man to take the place of God in deciding when another man should die.   But the greatest evil is not the loss of our earthly life.  It is the loss of the eternal life that God desires to share with us. His interventions into human affairs are, I suspect, most often geared toward guiding us toward our eternal destiny than toward keeping us safe and comfortable in the here and now.

Most important, I know that “all things work for good for those who love Him, and walk according to His ways.”  All things.  Even the choices of evil men.  If He could use Roman executioners to bring about our salvation, He can bring good from any evil.

Have our prayers been answered?  Yes, even if we can’t know the extent. Has He thwarted other attacks?  Has His hand of protection minimized the casualties?  And, more important, have our prayers impacted the eternal fate of those whose lives were lost?

I know we see His love in action in the heroism of first responders and others on the scene.  We see it in the outpouring of love and support from a grieving world.  And we know that He is with us as we grieve, and as we search for solutions.

God isn’t a god who protects us from every evil that could befall us in this life.  He is the God of all consolation — the God who knows suffering because He suffered, who walks with us in our suffering, and works it all for the greatest good, our eternal salvation.

So in this situation, like all others, we need to act.  We need to work toward effective ways of protecting innocent human life.  But as we do that, we also need to pray.  Earnestly and consistently.

All of us.  Even politicians.

Even Jimmy Kimmel.

Featured image by Drew Angerer | Getty Images

COMING UP: Carmelite lived the cloistered life ‘to the full’

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In 1950, at the ripe age of 18, Sister Mona Claire of Our Lady entered religious life as a Carmelite of the Holy Spirit. For the next 67 years, she went on to live a cloistered life away from the world in deep prayer.

It would seem it was no coincidence, then, that she passed away on May 20 — the feast of Pentecost.

“For her to die on the feast of Pentecost — it’s our biggest solemnity next to Christmas because we’re the Carmel of the Holy Spirit,” said Mother Mary of Jesus, prioress of the discalced Carmelite nuns of Littleton. “Our blessed Lord really favored her, I think.”

Over 20 of Sister Mona’s 67 years as a Carmelite were spent as a secretary answering phone calls and responding to requests for prayers and Mass offerings. Sister Mona was also a talented seamstress and spent much of her time making clothes for the Sisters and altar linens.

Sister Mona’s most unique job was perhaps taking care of sheep, which the monastery had up until the 1980s, and her most beautiful work was likely her profound prayer life.

“She always prayed,” said Mother Mary. “Even in her last few days, if she said anything, it was a prayer.”

Mother Mary recalled that the doctor who attended to Sister Mona at the hospital after she experienced a fall shortly before she passed asked her to open her eyes, and she was unable to follow his commands.

“But I would say a prayer, and she’d finish it for me,” said Mother Mary. “I would say, ‘Praise be Jesus Christ,’ and she would say, ‘Now and forever.’ I think her last words were ‘Now and forever.’”

Mother Mary admired Sister Mona for her patience and efforts to please God, as well as her positive attitude in all circumstances.

“I noticed that even in the pain she was in when she was dying, she never moaned or anything,” said Mother Mary. “She never complained one little bit.”

Mother Mary believes it was a blessing that Sister Mona was able to remain so close to God even during her final days — a grace that likely stemmed from the consistent efforts she made to be close to him throughout her life.

“If you’re constantly corresponding with grace and praying, it’s going to come to you in those last moments,” said Mother Mary. “It will strengthen you for the journey. I think that’s what happened.”

Mother Mary witnessed graces showering down during on Sister Mona even during her funeral, particularly when Bishop Jorge Rodriguez blessed her coffin before it was lowered into the ground.

“There were turtle doves. You could hear turtle doves cooing,” not back and forth, but in unison, Mother Mary said. It reminded those in attendance of Song of Solomon 2, which mentions the voice of a turtledove in a chapter about the love of a bride groom.

The beauty of the moment didn’t go unnoticed, much like Sister Mona’s life of service.

“She was the loving and praying heart of the Church and the Carmel [community] here for almost 68 years,” said Mother Mary. “Everything she did was for souls and for our dear Lord’s greater glory and honor,” she said.

Mother Mary believes Sister Mona had a profound impact on the world, even though she had little contact with it.

“Having been in the convent as long as she was, she really impacted the diocese and the world with her ever-flowing prayers,” said Mother Mary. “It’s just the nature of cloistered life — and she lived it to the full.”