Vatican art collection comes to readers in new book

Julie Filby
Legionary Father Mark Haydu author of "Meditations on Vatican Art" Nov. 16 while at St. Thomas More Parish in Centennial during a stop on his U.S. book tour.

In his newly released book “Meditations on Vatican Art,” author Legionary Father Mark Haydu encourages readers to experience masterpieces from the Vatican art collection in a meditative and prayerful way.

“People need and want beauty, they’re starved for it,” Father Haydu told the Denver Catholic Register Nov. 16 while at St. Thomas More Parish in Centennial during a stop on his U.S. book tour. “On a moral level beauty is holiness, so they’re starved for interior peace. On an aesthetics level, they’re starved for harmony, beauty and transcendence.”

“Meditations on Vatican Art”—which quickly sold out 500 copies at the Centennial signing—is a 216-page, full-color hardcover collection of works thoughtfully selected from the 300,000 pieces contained in the 12 Vatican Museums. It includes pieces by masters such as Michelangelo, Raphael, Caravaggio, Cano and Pinturicchio. Each is paired with reflections based on the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola, scriptural meditations, history and contextual notes help readers understand the artist’s perspective and meaning, and questions for reflection.

“It’s enough art to put you in the context, learn something new, and increase your cultural background,” the priest said. “And just what you need as a platform to go into the message of the art and have a spiritual experience.”

The book is available at www.liguori.org, on Amazon or in Catholic bookstores. For more information, visit www.VaticanArt.org. For the full version of this story, read the Nov. 20 Denver Catholic Register.

 

“Meditations on Vatican Art”

Author: Father Mark Haydu, L.C.
Publisher: Ligouri Publications, 216 pages
Price: $29.99
Purchase: www.liguori.org, Amazon, Catholic bookstores
More information: www.VaticanArt.org

 

COMING UP: Sensitive locations, not ‘sanctuary’

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DENVER, CO - DECEMBER 11: Msgr. Bernie Schmitz preaches the homily during the announcement of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish as a diocesan shrine on December 11, 2016, in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Anya Semenoff/Denver Catholic)

With the election of President Donald Trump, many immigrants are uncertain of their future in America. The situation has ignited a national conversation about immigrants and their legal status.

The term “sanctuary” has been making waves in the headlines recently after Denver immigrant Jeanette Vizguerra sought assistance at a local Unitarian church for fear of being deported. The term itself has largely been adopted by the media to describe cities where immigrants cannot be questioned about their immigration status and locations where immigrants can seek refuge and be safe from arrest.

While the so-called “Muslim ban” has been garnering a lot of media attention, there’s another piece of the conversation that’s equally as pertinent; that of the immigrants who are already living in the U.S.; those who have fled their home country in search of something better, established their lives here — and many of which are of Latino descent.

The fear among many Latinos is still prevalent, as many wonder what will become of their residence here in the U.S. under a Trump presidency.

“For those here today illegally who are seeking legal status, they will have one route and only one route: to return home and apply for re-entry,” President Trump said in an Aug. 31 speech in Phoenix, Ariz.

The law doesn’t give definition to “sanctuary” but instead describes places where immigrants are safe from any sort of enforcement action by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) as “sensitive locations.” A 2011 memorandum distributed by ICE outlines that sensitive locations include, but are not limited to: schools, hospitals, churches, synagogues, mosques or other institutions of worship, the site of a funeral, wedding or other public religious ceremony and public demonstrations, such as a rally or march.

The memo states that enforcement actions are prohibited from taking place in any of these locations without prior approval by an ICE supervisor. In this event, supervisors are to “take extra care when assessing whether a planned enforcement action could reasonably be viewed as causing significant disruption to the normal operations of the sensitive location.”

The policy does, however, call for exigent circumstances in which enforcement actions can be carried out without prior approval. These include: matters of national security or terrorism, an imminent risk of death, violence or physical harm to any person or property, the immediate arrest of individual(s) that present an imminent danger to public safety, or an imminent risk of destruction of evidence material to an ongoing criminal case.

Should any of these situations arise, the memo instructs ICE agents to “conduct themselves as discretely as possible, consistency with office and public safety, and make every effort to lift the time at or focused on the sensitive location.”