All things Scalia (Father Scalia)

Karna Lozoya

Father Paul Scalia made national headlines in 2016 when he delivered the homily at his father’s funeral. Instead of eulogizing the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia (1936-2016) for his rich legacy and great legal mind, the diocesan priest of Arlington, Virginia, spoke on the person of Jesus Christ, a move Father Scalia describes as simply doing his job as a Catholic priest.

This month, Father Scalia will visit Denver as the last speaker of the 2016/17 Archbishop’s Lecture Series. He will deliver a talked titled “The Word of the Lord Came to Me,” which seeks to consider “the increasing importance of prophetic Catholic witness in the culture today.”

This event is sold out. Watch it LIVE on Denver Catholic’s Facebook page (March 21, 7pm).

Ordained in 1996, Father Scalia has served in various parishes, and is currently the vicar for clergy. He founded the Arlington Diocese chapter of Courage and serves also as Chairman of the Board of Directors for Courage, International.

In this interview with Denver Catholic, Father Scalia offers, among other things, a glimpse into what dinner was like at the Scalia home, where you needed to watch your grammar; how his mother, Maureen Scalia, held the Supreme Court Justice accountable for taking out the trash; the road that led him to the priesthood; as well as the importance of Courage, a ministry that helps those with same-sex attraction live out Church teaching.

Here are some of the best excerpts.

On making national headlines

First, I like to think of it in terms of “the Church made headlines,” because if a priest preaches well it’s because people are interceding for him and because he has the grace of Our Lord through the Church. And I was very conscious of the fact that the Mass is the Church at prayer, and that’s where we are most ourselves, so it’s a tribute to the mystical body of Christ more than to me.

In a lot of ways there was nothing remarkable about the homily. … A funeral homily in the Catholic Church should never be a eulogy, it should always point to Our Lord, and a lot of the things that I touched on, I would have touched on at any funeral homily. Obviously, it had a lot more meaning and significance because I was speaking of my own father, and I could speak from that depth.

When I got home from the funeral I checked my email and a friend of mine sent me an email and he said, “Remember, you were just doing your job.” And that is exactly right.

On his mother

Archbishop Chaput wrote me shortly after my father’s death and he said, in my experience, a great man is not a great man alone, but it’s because he has a family. And my dad could not have been the kind of man he was without my mom. That’s an impossibility, and he knew that. And he would grouse and grumble at times if she held him accountable for certain things, like taking out the trash, but he knew that she was such a great source of support for him.

On family dinner, and grammar

My dad said once to someone in a Q and A, “you gotta be home for dinner.” That’s the key to the family. Dinner is where they are civilized, meaning, where they get civilized. And so, the dinner table was really a great place where we would come together. And there was plenty of grammatical correction there. And mom, and dad, were not shy about correcting us and teaching us. But then also there was conversation on philosophy, theology, and all of these different things we would discuss, and sometimes [we would] just goof off.

On learning integrity

My brother recounts a time when he was asking my dad permission for something, and he used the old line, “well, everyone else is doing it.” And my dad looked at him in puzzlement and asked him, “why would you want to be like everyone else?” In other words, you have to be who you are.

And [they taught] integrity about the faith. My parents made some serious sacrifices to make sure that at the very least we were going to a parish that was theologically sound and liturgically beautiful, or at least reverent. Raising kids in the 60s, 70s and 80s, these were some of the most confused and confusing times in the Church’s history, and in more than one place where we lived, my parents would bring us on a considerable drive to find a church that was doctrinally sound and liturgically reverent. And that sent a message, that certainly sent a message to us that this is something worth making a sacrifice for. And this is who we are.

And that’s what I mean by integrity. There was just this sense of “this is who we are,” and we shouldn’t expect to be like everybody else, nor should we desire to be like everybody else. We should be who we are according to our beliefs.

On the road to the priesthood

The first time it hit me was on the way home from my confirmation, and it was just my dad and I in the car, and I remember we had to stop and run an errand, and I was in the car alone for a couple minutes, and I remember just very clearly thinking, I am going to be a priest. It wasn’t, I want to be a priest, and it wasn’t, God wants me to be a priest, it was simply a matter of, this is what is going to happen.

In college [College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA], my friends and I started a newspaper, an independent newspaper. And … it was a troublemaker. And that was our intention. It was an independent newspaper and we were taking potshots at the administration. And that put me in the position of articulating the faith and trying to convince people of it.

At the same time, I was coming to a greater realization, in getting to know more people on campus, how the problems, the struggles that people have interiorly are always best answered and only fully answered by Catholic doctrine and sacraments.

It was a blend of things, so that by the time I sat down and wrote my essay to apply to the seminary, it all lined up very nicely, all these various influences in my life that had led me to this, to this vocation, in which I am commissioned to articulate the faith that nourishes people, that saves souls, and to administer the sacraments, which alone are the ways that we find peace.

On the final decision

One summer I interned on Capitol Hill at the Heritage Foundation, it was a great summer. And that was the summer that I finally decided to enter the seminary and spoke with a vocations director. And a lot of it came about because I realized over the course of that summer that we could propose a lot of legislation, we could advocate for this that or the other, but if we wanted to change people, to affect people for the better, well, only the priest can go that deep. Only the priest can go into the soul and make the change that needs to be made.

On becoming a diocesan priest

I didn’t ever think of anything but diocesan and parish life, because first, that is what I knew, I had very few encounters with religious priests. The parish priest is what I knew, and the diocese is what I knew, and I knew good, strong, courageous, holy priests, and I said, I want to join that. I want to be a part of that.

In our diocese, we have been blessed with very many vocations. In my class I am one of 13 ordained. So, we have been blessed with many vocations, and the area is growing rapidly. We’ve been blessed with a series of very good bishops, who have just kept clarity and charity as central. So, all those things have just been a great blessing.

On the work of Courage

The apostolate of Courage is articulating in a charitable way what the Church teaches, and not only that, but establishing places, and groups, where people can go and find the Church’s assistance, and find the accompaniment that Pope Francis talks about. It’s such a great word that he uses there [accompaniment], because that is exactly what our Courage chapters do, they accompany people to help them live chastity. … It’s not enough to have a clear teaching, we must have those means of assisting people to live it, and that’s what Courage is all about, it’s giving a clear teaching, but also giving the means to live it.

On giving prophetic witness

What I would like to do in the talk is speak about what it means to be a prophetic witness in light of the prophets, and what do we learn from them, and what do they have to teach us.

The institutional dimension of the Church is simply not going to have as much presence in the world. The days of the Catholic Church building enormous hospitals and schools and universities and orphanages, those are over. We just aren’t doing that anymore. And the temptation is to look back and say gosh, now what do we do, right? But the fact of the matter is, our greatest strength is in being prophetic witnesses, and you don’t need an institution to do that.

The Archbishop’s Lecture Series is a quarterly event, held in the refectory of St. John Vianney Seminary. Sign up for VIP access to the Archbishop’s Lecture Series: www.archden.org/lecture.

COMING UP: Celebrate and support the sacred gift of life

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Editor’s Note: This column is adapted from Archbishop Aquila’s remarks to the 2018 Celebrate Life March, which took place on January 13th in front of the Colorado State Capitol building.

As we gather today to celebrate life, we must remember three things: 1) life is a gift, 2) life is sacred, and 3) rebuilding a culture of life requires joy.

We are here today to celebrate our joy over the gift of life. Every minute and every day we live presents us with an abundance of gifts that seem mundane and are often overlooked: our health, the gift of creation, or something as simple as having food on our plates. Above all, we should give thanks for the gift of life!

As people involved in protecting life at every stage, the challenge we face is not just one of providing resources to mothers and fathers in need or ensuring people battling a terminal illness have good palliative care. Our challenge is to also communicate to them that they are loved, that their unborn child or their own lives are gifts, no matter the circumstances.

Many of us fought in 2016 to prevent doctor-assisted suicide from becoming legal in Colorado, and one person who helped in that effort was a courageous man named J.J. Hanson. J.J. was a Marine veteran and father of two young children who was working for a real estate investment firm in Florida when he found out he had glioblastoma multiforme brain cancer. His doctors told him that it was a very aggressive cancer that meant he only had four months to live.

Despite his odds, J.J. resolved to fight. His motto was: “Every single day is a gift, and we can’t let that go.” What’s even more remarkable is the fact that J.J. dedicated his time and energy to fighting the legalization of assisted suicide around the country, all while undergoing chemotherapy and other treatments. There was hardly a speaking engagement or trip to testify before a legislature that J.J. turned down. His conviction that life was a gift propelled him to defend that gift however he could. As pro-life people, we need to have that same conviction.

Just about two weeks ago, on December 30th, J.J. was called home to the Father – three years beyond what doctors told him to expect. St. Anthony of Padua church in upstate New York, where his funeral was held, was filled with people who paid tribute to how J.J. inspired them to embrace every moment of life, no matter its difficulties as a gift, not something to be thrown away.

All of us are called to embrace life as J.J. did, and in doing so we will help recover the culture of life that is being neglected or forgotten as people cast God and truth aside.

I have said that life is a gift, and while that is true, it’s more than that. Life is also sacred. Life is sacred because it comes from God, the God who is love and who has loved us first. Our lives are also sacred because our beings are made in God’s image and likeness.

We are called to participate in the love of God and to see that every human being, from the moment of conception until natural death, is invited into relationship with God. We are called to ensure that life is set aside for God, that it is honored and recognized as sacred.

The struggle for so many today is that they do not even believe in a god; their only god is themselves. They truly do not believe in the God who is love. And because of this limited worldview, a person’s life can lose its value if their “quality of life” declines.

In the words of Pope Francis to participants in the 2013 Day for Life, “All life has inestimable value even the weakest and most vulnerable, the sick, the old, the unborn and the poor, are masterpieces of God’s creation, made in his own image, destined to live forever, and deserving of the utmost reverence and respect.”

When Jesus speaks about the Judgement of the Nations in Matthew 25, he tells us that life is always sacred by saying that when we love the weak and vulnerable, we are loving him.

The more that we can love the sacred gift of life and celebrate it with joy, the more we will contribute to building a true culture of life in the U.S.

A wonderful example of concretely loving the sacred gift of life is a story I recently heard about a 15-year-old Colorado teenager named Missy, who showed up with her parents at an abortion clinic in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Missy was a sophomore in high school and was in her second trimester of pregnancy. As they approached the clinic, some pro-life volunteers who were parked nearby in a mobile crisis pregnancy van saw them and invited them inside. The volunteers learned that Missy wanted to complete high school and that this desire was pushing her to consider an abortion. One of the volunteers told Missy about how she was faced with the same choice as a teen and chose to keep her child. “It wasn’t easy, but it was amazing,” she reassured Missy.

Missy also worried about the father of the child not being around, to which her dad responded by taking her hand and saying, “I’ll be that man in your child’s life.”

This kind of accompaniment and willingness to heroically support the gift of life is vitally important to forming a culture that welcomes the unborn, the elderly, the disabled and the dying as a gift.

Building a culture of life begins by first receiving the love of the Father, who loves each of us as his sons and daughters. He never abandons us, even though we might abandon him or reject his love.

A culture of life grows when we share his love with others, helping them to embrace life as a gift and a joy, rather than a burden.

Life is a gift, it is sacred and our celebration of the joy of life helps build a culture of life.

I encourage you to be those who are unafraid to give witness to life. Be not afraid to give witness to life. Even though people might ridicule you, yell at you, or reject you, know that Jesus experienced it all so that you might have life, and life abundantly.

May God bless you and help you celebrate life in 2018!