What is the message of Divine Mercy?

And how to pray the chaplet

Julie Filby
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Throughout history, visionaries such as Francis of Assisi, Joan of Arc and Bernadette of Lourdes have relayed divine messages—including the message of Divine Mercy revealed to a young peasant girl in Poland.Sister Faustina

In the 1930s Jesus appeared Helena Kowalska, the third of 10 children of Marianna and Stanislaus Kowalska, living in Glogowiec. Helena, who later became known as Sister Faustina after entering the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy convent, recorded the revelations in a diary. According to St. Faustina’s diary, Jesus said: “My daughter, know that my heart is mercy itself. From this sea of mercy graces flow out upon the whole world. No soul that has approached me has ever gone away unconsoled” (“The Diary of Sister M. Faustina Kowalska,” No. 1777).

Though originally viewed with skepticism, ultimately her life and writings inspired the Divine Mercy message and devotion of the Church. Soon-to-be canonized Pope John Paul II, who was also Polish, took a personal interest in the visions of Sister Faustina. He promoted her sainthood cause and canonized her personally on April 30, 2000.

At the same time the pontiff officially designated the Second Sunday of Easter, the date revealed to St. Faustina, as the feast of Divine Mercy. The Holy Father declared, “It is important then that we accept the whole message that comes to us from the word of God on this Second Sunday of Easter”—referring to the path of mercy with God and others indicated in the liturgy’s readings.

This year Divine Mercy Sunday is April 27: the day Blessed John Paul II will be canonized. On the feast, a plenary indulgence may be granted under the usual conditions of confession, receiving Communion and praying for the intentions of the pontiff.

How to Pray the Chaplet of Divine Mercy
1. Begin with the Sign of the Cross, Our Father, Hail Mary and Apostles Creed.

2. Using a rosary, on the Our Father beads say: Eternal Father, I offer you the body and blood, soul and divinity of your dearly beloved Son, Our Lord Jesus Christ, in atonement for our sins and those of the whole world.

3. On the 10 Hail Mary beads say: For the sake of his sorrowful Passion, have mercy on us and on the whole world.

4. Repeat step 2 and 3 for all five decades.

5. Conclude with: Holy God, Holy Mighty One, Holy Immortal One, have mercy on us and on the whole world (three times).

COMING UP: Sensitive locations, not ‘sanctuary’

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DENVER, CO - DECEMBER 11: Msgr. Bernie Schmitz preaches the homily during the announcement of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish as a diocesan shrine on December 11, 2016, in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Anya Semenoff/Denver Catholic)

With the election of President Donald Trump, many immigrants are uncertain of their future in America. The situation has ignited a national conversation about immigrants and their legal status.

The term “sanctuary” has been making waves in the headlines recently after Denver immigrant Jeanette Vizguerra sought assistance at a local Unitarian church for fear of being deported. The term itself has largely been adopted by the media to describe cities where immigrants cannot be questioned about their immigration status and locations where immigrants can seek refuge and be safe from arrest.

While the so-called “Muslim ban” has been garnering a lot of media attention, there’s another piece of the conversation that’s equally as pertinent; that of the immigrants who are already living in the U.S.; those who have fled their home country in search of something better, established their lives here — and many of which are of Latino descent.

The fear among many Latinos is still prevalent, as many wonder what will become of their residence here in the U.S. under a Trump presidency.

“For those here today illegally who are seeking legal status, they will have one route and only one route: to return home and apply for re-entry,” President Trump said in an Aug. 31 speech in Phoenix, Ariz.

The law doesn’t give definition to “sanctuary” but instead describes places where immigrants are safe from any sort of enforcement action by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) as “sensitive locations.” A 2011 memorandum distributed by ICE outlines that sensitive locations include, but are not limited to: schools, hospitals, churches, synagogues, mosques or other institutions of worship, the site of a funeral, wedding or other public religious ceremony and public demonstrations, such as a rally or march.

The memo states that enforcement actions are prohibited from taking place in any of these locations without prior approval by an ICE supervisor. In this event, supervisors are to “take extra care when assessing whether a planned enforcement action could reasonably be viewed as causing significant disruption to the normal operations of the sensitive location.”

The policy does, however, call for exigent circumstances in which enforcement actions can be carried out without prior approval. These include: matters of national security or terrorism, an imminent risk of death, violence or physical harm to any person or property, the immediate arrest of individual(s) that present an imminent danger to public safety, or an imminent risk of destruction of evidence material to an ongoing criminal case.

Should any of these situations arise, the memo instructs ICE agents to “conduct themselves as discretely as possible, consistency with office and public safety, and make every effort to lift the time at or focused on the sensitive location.”