Masses for skiers, boarders and mountain travelers

While it is encouraged that the faithful attend the parish within the boundaries where they reside, we active Coloradans often enjoy traveling to the mountains and out-of-state during the weekends and therefore cannot attend Mass at our home parish.  A complete parish locator is available at ArchDen.org, but here’s a handy list of some of the mountain parishes and Mass times to ensure you don’t miss a Mass, no matter where you are.

St. Mary (Aspen)

Daily: Monday – Thursday: 7 a.m.; Friday: 5:30 p.m.
Saturday: N/A
Saturday (Anticipatory): 5:30 p.m.
Sunday: 7:30 a.m., 10 a.m.
Confessions: Saturday: 4:30 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.

St. Vincent (Basalt)

Daily: Monday: 7 p.m. (Bilingual); Wednesday and Friday: 8:15 a.m.
Saturday: N/A
Saturday (Anticipatory): 5:30 p.m.
Sunday: 10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. (Spanish)
Confessions: Saturday: 5:00 p.m. – 5:20 p.m.; Sunday: 12 p.m. – 12:20 p.m.

Summit Catholic

St. Mary (Breckenridge)

Daily: N/A
Saturday: N/A
Saturday (Anticipatory): 5 p.m.
Sunday: 8 a.m., 10 a.m.
Confessions: Thursday: 6 a.m. – 7 a.m.; Saturday: 4:15 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

Our Lady of Peace (Silverthorne)

Daily: Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 6:30 a.m., 8:00 a.m.
Saturday: N/A
Saturday (Anticipatory): 5:00 p.m.
Sunday: 8:00 AM, 10:00 a.m., 12:00 p.m. (Spanish)
Confessions: Saturday: 4:15 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.; First Monday of the Month: 5:00 – 6:00 p.m. or by appointment

Copper Mountain Inter Chapel

Sunday: 5:15 p.m. (starting on Christmas and concluding at Easter)

Grand Catholic (Winter Park Region)

St. Bernard (Fraser)

Saturday: 7:30 p.m.(from Nov 14 to Mar 31) ; Sunday: 7 a.m.

Our Lady of the Snow (Granby)

Sunday: 9:30 a.m.

St. Anne (Grand Lake)

Daily: Monday: 8:30 a.m.
Saturday: N/A
Saturday (Anticipatory): 5 p.m.
Sunday: Only during the month of July – 12 p.m.
Confessions: Saturday: 4 p.m. – 4:50 p.m.

St. Peter (Kremmling)

Daily: N/A
Saturday: N/A
Saturday (Anticipatory): N/A
Sunday: 10 a.m.
Confessions: Sunday: 9:30 a.m. – 9:50 a.m.

St. Ignatius (Walden)

Daily: N/A
Saturday: N/A
Saturday (Anticipatory): 4 p.m.
Sunday: N/A
Confessions: Saturday: 3:30 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.

St. Clare of Assisi

Daily: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday: 7 a.m. (during the school year); Wednesday: 8:15 a.m. (School Mass)
Saturday: N/A
Saturday (Anticipatory): N/A
Sunday: 8:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. (Spanish)
Confessions: Before all Masses or by appointment

St. Mary (Eagle)

Daily: Tuesday: 5:30 p.m.; Thursday: 5:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m. (Spanish)
Saturday: N/A
Saturday (Anticipatory): 7 p.m. (Spanish)
Sunday: 8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m. (Bilingual)
Confessions: Monday: 5 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. or Saturday before Mass

St. Patrick (Minturn)

Daily: Tuesday: 5:30 p.m. (in the Chapel)
Saturday: N/A
Saturday (Anticipatory): In the Chapel: 4 p.m.
Sunday: In the Church: 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. (see website for up-to-date schedule)
Confessions: By Appointment

Steamboat Catholic

Holy Name (Steamboat Springs)

Daily: Wed. and Friday: 7:30 a.m.; Monday and Thursday: 12:10 p.m.: Tuesday and Thursday: 5:30 p.m.
Saturday: N/A
Saturday (Anticipatory): 5 p.m. (Bilingual)
Sunday: 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m.
Confessions: Saturday: 4 p.m. – 5 p.m.; Sunday: 30 minutes before Mass, or by appointment

St. Michael

678 School Street

Craig, CO 81625

Mass & Sacraments

Daily: Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday: 8:30 a.m.; Thursday: 6 p.m.

Saturday: N/A

Saturday (Anticipatory): 5:30, 7:15 p.m. (Spanish)

Sunday: 9:00 a.m.

Confessions: 30 minutes before Mass or by appointment

Adoration: Thursday: 10 a.m.

St. Stephen Protomartyr

1885 Blake Avenue

Glenwood Springs, CO 81601

Mass & Sacraments

Weekdays: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday 7:30am. Thursday 8:15 a.m.
1st Saturday: 8 a.m.
Saturday Anticipated Masses: 4:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. – Spanish
Sunday: 8 & 10 a.m., and 12 p.m.  – Spanish
Confessions: Thursday 7:30 a.m., Saturday 3:30 p.m. and Sunday 11:15 a.m. 

St. Mary (Rifle)

761 Birch Avenue

Rifle, CO 81650

Mass & Sacraments

Daily: Monday, Tuesday, and Friday: 7:30 a.m.; Thursday: 7 p.m. (Spanish)

Saturday: N/A

Saturday (Anticipatory): 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m. (Spanish)

Sunday: 9:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. (Spanish)

Confessions: Mon, Tue, Fri-7 a.m., Thu-6:30 p.m., Saturday-3:30 p.m. and 6 p.m., Sun-12 p.m., or by appointment.

Adoration: Monday, Tuesday, and Friday: 8 a.m. – 9 a.m.

Mass at Denver International Airport

If you’re going to be traveling this holiday and won’t have time to make it Mass before catching your flight, fret not! Mass is celebrated every Sunday at 1 p.m. at Denver International Airport in the interfaith chapel on level 6, Terminal East.

For a more complete list of mountain mass schedules, including missions and chapels, visit the parish locator at archden.org/parish-locator/ Please note that Mass times are subject to change.  Be sure to verify correct Mass times with each parish.

COMING UP: Navigating major cultural challenges

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We’re navigating through a true rock and a hard place right now: moral relativism and the oversaturation of technology. In fact, they are related. Moral relativism leaves us without a compass to discern the proper use of technology. And technological oversaturation leads to a decreased ability to think clearly about what matters most and how to achieve it.

Fortunately, we have some Odysseus-like heroes to guide our navigation. Edward Sri’s book Who Am I to Judge?: Responding to Relativism with Logic and Love (Augustine Institute, 2017) provides a practical guide for thinking through the moral life and how to communicate to others the truth in love. Christopher Blum and Joshua Hochschild take on the second challenge with their book A Mind at Peace: Reclaiming an Ordered Soul in the Age of Distraction (Sophia, 2017).

Sri’s book describes conversations that have become quite common. When discussing moral issues, we hear too often, “this is true for me,” “I feel this is right,” or “who am I to judge?” We are losing our ability both to think about and discuss moral problems in a coherent fashion. Morality has become an expression of individual and subjective feeling, rather than clear reasoning based on the truth. In fact, many, or even most, young people would say there is no clear truth when it comes to morality—the very definition of relativism.

Beyond this inability to reason clearly, Christians also face pressure to remain silent in the face of immoral action, shamed into a corner with the label of bigotry. In response to our moral crisis, Sri encourages us to learn more about our own great tradition of morality focused on virtue and happiness. He also provides excellent guidance on how to engage others in a loving conversation to help them consider that our actions relate not only to our own fulfillment, but to our relationships with others.

Sri points out that it’s hard to “win” an argument with relativists, because “relativistic tendencies are rooted in various assumptions they have absorbed from the culture an in habits of thinking and living they have formed over a lifetime” (13). Rather than “winning,” Sri advises us to accompany others through moral and spiritual growth with seven keys, described in the second half of the book. These keys help us to see others through the heart of Christ, with mercy, and to reframe discussions about morality, turning more toward love and addressing underlying wounds. Ultimately, he asks us, “will you be Jesus?” to those struggling with relativism. (155).

Blum and Hochschild’s book complements Sri’s by focusing on the virtues we need to address our cultural challenges. They point to another common concern we all face: a “crisis of attention” as our minds wander, preoccupied with social media (2). More positively, they encourage us to “be consoled” as “there are remedies” to help us “regain an ordered and peaceful mind, which thinks more clearly and attends more steadily” (ibid.). The path they point out can be found in a virtuous and ordered life guided by wisdom.

To achieve peace, we need virtues and other good habits, which create order within us. “With order, our attention is focused, directed, clear, trustworthy, and fruitful” (10). The book encourages us to rediscover fundamental realities of life, such as being attune to our senses and to aspire to higher and noble things. The authors, with the help of the saints, provide a guidebook to forming important dispositions to overcome the addiction and distraction that come with the omnipresence of media and technology.

The book’s chapters address topics such as self-awareness, steadfastness, resilience, watchfulness, creativity, purposefulness, and decisiveness.  These dispositions will create order in how we use our tools and within our inner faculties. They will help us to be more intentional in our action so that we do not succumb to passivity and distraction.  Overall, the book leads us to consider how we can rediscover simple and profound realities, such as a good conversation, periods of silence, and a rightly ordered imagination.

Both books help us to navigate our culture, equipping us to respond more intentionally to the interior and exterior challenges we face.