Help the homeless during Ride the Rockies

Larry Smith

For the fifth consecutive year, Team Samaritan House will be part of Ride the Rockies, which this year starts in Grand Junction on June 13 and ends June 20 in Westcliffe.

We have 19 riders registered on the team—16 men and three women—with a goal of raising $5,000 a piece for Catholic Charities homeless shelters in northern Colorado. That includes Samaritan House and Father Ed Judy House in Denver, The Mission in Fort Collins and the Guadalupe Community Center in Greeley.

When you get on a bike to ride 465 miles to raise money for the poor, every pedal that you push reminds you of a plight much worse than your own. It puts you in a position to really appreciate how hard it must be to live as a homeless person, without income, without a place to live.

I encourage you to become part of the team. Here’s how. Go to ccdenver.org/rtr to see the route and pick a rider to support. We’ll be posting updates there, and on social media sites throughout the week of the race. Please consider a donation of $465, one dollar for every mile. Any amount donated is appreciated and 100 percent of the money donated goes to provide shelter and to help homeless people regain their sense of dignity and self-reliance.

This is one of our major fundraising efforts for our homeless shelters and the money raised goes far. Every $1.60 raised allows us to provide a meal to a person in need. Last year, about 430,000 meals were served through Catholic Charities shelters.

It’s humbling for the Team Samaritan House riders to know that while we’re experiencing God’s beauty and creation—albeit from a very sore saddle and aching legs—we’re doing it for people living a life on the streets that many of us can’t comprehend. Ride the Rockies allows us to put 100 percent of our mental and physical effort to raising money for our homeless shelters and to provide food for our less fortunate brothers and sisters.

Because we wear the Team Samaritan House jerseys, with the Catholic Charities emblem, whenever we come across a rider who has a flat tire, or a broken bike, or is struggling on the roadside, we always slow down and ask what kind of help we can offer. And if anything is needed, we stop. It may be giving them a protein bar or a bottle of water or changing a tire.

That service is a small reminder to us that we’re here to help one another, however we can. And there’s nothing more important than helping Catholic Charities show the kindness, mercy and compassion of Jesus Christ through our shelter services. You can help. You can join us in saying that homeless people matter. Go to ccdenver.org/rtr and become part of the team.

COMING UP: Navigating major cultural challenges

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We’re navigating through a true rock and a hard place right now: moral relativism and the oversaturation of technology. In fact, they are related. Moral relativism leaves us without a compass to discern the proper use of technology. And technological oversaturation leads to a decreased ability to think clearly about what matters most and how to achieve it.

Fortunately, we have some Odysseus-like heroes to guide our navigation. Edward Sri’s book Who Am I to Judge?: Responding to Relativism with Logic and Love (Augustine Institute, 2017) provides a practical guide for thinking through the moral life and how to communicate to others the truth in love. Christopher Blum and Joshua Hochschild take on the second challenge with their book A Mind at Peace: Reclaiming an Ordered Soul in the Age of Distraction (Sophia, 2017).

Sri’s book describes conversations that have become quite common. When discussing moral issues, we hear too often, “this is true for me,” “I feel this is right,” or “who am I to judge?” We are losing our ability both to think about and discuss moral problems in a coherent fashion. Morality has become an expression of individual and subjective feeling, rather than clear reasoning based on the truth. In fact, many, or even most, young people would say there is no clear truth when it comes to morality—the very definition of relativism.

Beyond this inability to reason clearly, Christians also face pressure to remain silent in the face of immoral action, shamed into a corner with the label of bigotry. In response to our moral crisis, Sri encourages us to learn more about our own great tradition of morality focused on virtue and happiness. He also provides excellent guidance on how to engage others in a loving conversation to help them consider that our actions relate not only to our own fulfillment, but to our relationships with others.

Sri points out that it’s hard to “win” an argument with relativists, because “relativistic tendencies are rooted in various assumptions they have absorbed from the culture an in habits of thinking and living they have formed over a lifetime” (13). Rather than “winning,” Sri advises us to accompany others through moral and spiritual growth with seven keys, described in the second half of the book. These keys help us to see others through the heart of Christ, with mercy, and to reframe discussions about morality, turning more toward love and addressing underlying wounds. Ultimately, he asks us, “will you be Jesus?” to those struggling with relativism. (155).

Blum and Hochschild’s book complements Sri’s by focusing on the virtues we need to address our cultural challenges. They point to another common concern we all face: a “crisis of attention” as our minds wander, preoccupied with social media (2). More positively, they encourage us to “be consoled” as “there are remedies” to help us “regain an ordered and peaceful mind, which thinks more clearly and attends more steadily” (ibid.). The path they point out can be found in a virtuous and ordered life guided by wisdom.

To achieve peace, we need virtues and other good habits, which create order within us. “With order, our attention is focused, directed, clear, trustworthy, and fruitful” (10). The book encourages us to rediscover fundamental realities of life, such as being attune to our senses and to aspire to higher and noble things. The authors, with the help of the saints, provide a guidebook to forming important dispositions to overcome the addiction and distraction that come with the omnipresence of media and technology.

The book’s chapters address topics such as self-awareness, steadfastness, resilience, watchfulness, creativity, purposefulness, and decisiveness.  These dispositions will create order in how we use our tools and within our inner faculties. They will help us to be more intentional in our action so that we do not succumb to passivity and distraction.  Overall, the book leads us to consider how we can rediscover simple and profound realities, such as a good conversation, periods of silence, and a rightly ordered imagination.

Both books help us to navigate our culture, equipping us to respond more intentionally to the interior and exterior challenges we face.