Catholic school students choose prayer over walk-outs

Aaron Lambert

On March 14, Denver’s Catholic school students honored the 17 victims of the Parkland, Fla. shooting not by rising to their feet in protest, but by dropping to their knees in prayer.

In the aftermath of the Feb. 14 shooting in Florida, Youth EMPOWER, a branch of young activists affiliated with the Women’s March, declared that March 14 would be a National Walk-Out Day in protest of gun violence. This declaration became a viral social media campaign that reached virtually high school all students in the nation, and mainstream media coverage on the day reported countless schools participating.

Students in the Archdiocese of Denver took a different approach. Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila and Elías Moo, superintendent of Denver’s Catholic Schools, encouraged pastors and principals to hold a 17-minute prayer service at their schools for the conversion of hearts and to intercede for the souls of those who have died in lieu of a 17-minute walk-out protest.

“We believe the first and most important response can and should be to unite in prayer,” Moo said. “At the core of what our country is confronted with today is a great spiritual battle, a battle for the soul of our society and nation.”

(Photos provided by Holy Family High School)

Among the schools that held a prayer service was Holy Family High School in Broomfield. Holy Family chaplain Father Joe McLagan led staff, students and parents in a rosary that morning.

Sophie Schmid, a sophomore at Holy Family, said of the prayer service that she “felt part of a greater spiritual movement for safety and peace.”

In a period of history where the national dialogue in regard to gun control revolves primarily around policy, Father McLagan referred to a Feb. 15 statement issued by Archbishop Charles J. Chaput of Philadelphia, who said that “…tighter gun restrictions – as vital and urgent as they now are – will not solve the problem. We’ve lost our respect for human life on a much broader scale, and this is the utterly predictable result.”

“Our dignity contains such a reality to it that we need to learn how to forgive, we need to learn how to grow in holiness and learn that our salvation doesn’t come from policy but from the Lord,” Father McLagan said. “A policy is only as good as the virtues in the people. If you don’t have a virtuous people, what expects your policy to be virtuous? It starts with being on our knees and then going into action, not acting without going to our knees.”

COMING UP: Catholic Charities joins with St. Raphael Counseling to increase services

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Two Catholic counseling agencies serving the Denver Archdiocese have united to expand services to the community, officials said. The change was effective May 1.

St. Raphael Counseling, founded in 2009, has partnered with Catholic Charities’ Sacred Heart Counseling (formerly Regina Caeli Clinical Services), which was established in 2011. The two are now one ministry under Catholic Charities of Denver sharing the name St. Raphael Counseling.

Licensed clinical psychologist Jim Langley, co-founder of St. Raphael’s, will serve as director.

“Frankly, it seemed kind of silly for two entities to be doing the same thing from the same pool of resources,” Langley told the Denver Catholic.  “I reached out to [Catholic Charities] … to see about removing obstacles. It really must have been from the Lord because there weren’t any big obstacles.”

The combined resources mean clients seeking care aligned with Catholic values will now have access to more therapists and locations: a total of 18 clinicians at 11 offices and six schools across the Front Range region, including Denver, Littleton and northern Colorado.

In the coming months, St. Raphael’s will accept more insurances and will introduce diagnostic testing for behavioral and learning disorders and Autism to families at affordable cost, Langley said.

“We are excited to welcome the team of psychologists from St. Raphael Counseling to Catholic Charities,” said Amparo García, interim president and CEO of Catholic Charities of Denver. “Under Dr. Langley’s guidance, and with his expertise and business acumen, the team has built a trusted and professional counseling service that is faithful to the Church and compassionate to those in need.

“We are optimistic that offering expanded services in a combined organization will provide an added benefit to the community.”

St. Raphael’s offers individuals, couples and families clinical counseling services for issues ranging from depression and anxiety to grief and addiction. It also offers marriage preparation, school counseling, psychological evaluations for seminary applicants, and counseling for priests and religious. It provides outreach and education through presentations and retreats that integrate psychology and spirituality.

St. Raphael’s is named after the Archangel Raphael, who in the Old Testament Book of Tobit is sent by God to help the young man Tobias confront nature and evil. Raphael helps to bring healing to Tobias’ family. Of Hebrew origin, Raphael means “God heals.”

“The name was chosen very deliberately,” Langley said. “We [as therapists] are only instruments of God’s healing, God’s medicine; it’s ultimately God who heals.

“One of the ways the Lord has given us as a path to holiness is through our own brokenness,” he added. “We all have emotional wounds and the healing of these wounds helps us to become the saints God made us to be.

“We work with individuals and families to help them face their woundedness, their brokenness. We do it in a way that is supportive of their Catholic values and can leverage all the awesome, beautiful things about Catholic spirituality that can help us grow as people.”

The recent suicides of celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain and fashion designer Kate Spade show that no one is immune from depression and suicidal thoughts, Langley said.

“Even St. Therese [of Lisieux] said there were moments when she was tempted by the medicine bottle on the nightstand,” he noted about the saint who was named a Doctor of the Church in 1997. “We think of her as being a joyful saint, yet she too struggled immensely with depression.

“If people are struggling, they need help,” Langley said. “But counseling isn’t just for people with big issues. It’s also for those who have normal issues and are trying to have a healthy family life.

“There’s nobody who doesn’t need support and good human relationships.”

RAPHAEL COUNSELING

Visit: straphaelcounseling.com

Phone: 720-377-1359