Cardinal O’Malley visits Denver’s Annunciation Parish

Boston’s archbishop addresses immigration, life issues

Even though the horizon looks bleak when it comes to immigration and end-of-life issues, there is hope, says the archbishop of Boston, Cardinal Seán Patrick O’Malley.

The cardinal, who is also the newest member of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, spoke to the Denver Catholic en Español during a visit to Denver last month, motivated by the first communion of his nephew.

The Capuchin cardinal, 72, made time during his quick trip to visit the parish served by the Capuchins here in Denver, Annunciation Parish, where he celebrated the morning Spanish Mass on May 28th.

Pope Benedict XVI elevated Boston’s archbishop to a cardinal in 2006, and in January, Pope Francis appointed him as a full board member of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith. He is also a member of the Pope’s “council of cardinals” and president of the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors.

Cardinal O’Malley has a master’s degree in religious education and a doctorate in Spanish and Portuguese literature from Catholic University of America.

Denver Catholic en Español: You began your priesthood serving the Hispanic community as the executive director of the Archdiocese of Washington’s Spanish Catholic Center in the early 1970s. How did you get to that position?

Cardinal O’Malley: I was in Washington from 1965 to 1984. When I was in Washington there was a great migration caused by the war in Central America. When I was a deacon, I was told that I was going to work on Easter Island in Chile with the Capuchins. But before my priestly ordination, the archbishop of Washington, D.C., told my provincial: ‘I have only one priest that speaks Spanish. Leave that brother here,’ so I spent 20 years in Washington working with the Hispanic community.

DCE: How do you view the situation of the Hispanic community of that time compared to the current situation?

CO: It was the time of the wars in Central America, and many of them were farmers and refugees. They fled from violence and misery. Their farms were destroyed by the wars. It was dangerous. There were a lot of Salvadorian immigrants. At that time, I got to know Blessed Óscar Romero very closely. Most of the parishioners were undocumented people. We can see that so many decades later we are in a similar situation.

Cardinal Se‡n O’Malley celebrates Mass during the Ascension of Jesus Christ at Annunciation Catholic Church on May 28, 2017, in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Daniel Petty/Denver Catholic)

DCE: What do you think of the Hispanic Catholic community in the United States?

CO: I see that the Hispanic community growing, numerous, and active. I admire the enthusiasm, the religious devotion, the family values, their work, and their participation.

DCE: The Hispanic community faces many challenges with regard to immigration, how do we resolve this issue?

CO: We urgently need a new legislation to deal with immigration issues. We should have more generous quotas and work visas for those who want to work in the agricultural sector so that they can be with their families. Now there are many people who are trapped and cannot go back to visit their families, or re-enter the country for the next harvest. President Bush tried with a bill that was sponsored by John McCain, a Republican, but even with that it was not approved. Obama couldn’t either. And like that, many years have passed and this has become more urgent than ever. We must solve the problems of the people and stop these deportations.

More than 60 percent of undocumented immigrants that live here have been here for more than 10 years, and many of them have children who are US citizens. Many of them own a home. The government must have a policy that favors families and should consider the situations of many undocumented workers who have been hard workers and who have contributed a lot to the country. Talking about them as if they were all delinquents is very unfair, and the Church, which has always been an immigrant church, must raise its voice in defense of the undocumented.

DCE: What message can we give to those who fear being deported?

CO: The hope is that there are many people who already realize the need to have more just [immigration] laws, and a pathway for people to have documents. The president said that when they managed to close the border and deport the criminals, he would treat the undocumented immigrants who are here with mercy. I hope this happens soon.

Cardinal Se‡n O’Malley greets parishoners after Mass celebrating the Ascension of Jesus Christ at Annunciation Catholic Church on May 28, 2017, in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Daniel Petty/Denver Catholic)

DCE: You are known for fighting in favor of the life of the unborn and the terminally ill, what challenges do you see in this country regarding life issues?

CO: The appointment of the new Supreme Court justice [Colorado native Neil Gorsuch] gives us hope. The president promised to name someone who was pro-life and it seems that he kept that promise. Also, the new judge has written a book on physician-assisted suicide. He is a man who understands the seriousness of these ethical problems. It is a very serious and very difficult challenge also because every year there are more states that submit referendums to legalize euthanasia. This is a result of the extreme individualism of the culture. We must take care of each other. Every human being at the beginning and at the end of his life needs someone to take care of him. It’s the human condition!

COMING UP: Catholic Charities joins with St. Raphael Counseling to increase services

Sign up for a digital subscription to Denver Catholic!

Two Catholic counseling agencies serving the Denver Archdiocese have united to expand services to the community, officials said. The change was effective May 1.

St. Raphael Counseling, founded in 2009, has partnered with Catholic Charities’ Sacred Heart Counseling (formerly Regina Caeli Clinical Services), which was established in 2011. The two are now one ministry under Catholic Charities of Denver sharing the name St. Raphael Counseling.

Licensed clinical psychologist Jim Langley, co-founder of St. Raphael’s, will serve as director.

“Frankly, it seemed kind of silly for two entities to be doing the same thing from the same pool of resources,” Langley told the Denver Catholic.  “I reached out to [Catholic Charities] … to see about removing obstacles. It really must have been from the Lord because there weren’t any big obstacles.”

The combined resources mean clients seeking care aligned with Catholic values will now have access to more therapists and locations: a total of 18 clinicians at 11 offices and six schools across the Front Range region, including Denver, Littleton and northern Colorado.

In the coming months, St. Raphael’s will accept more insurances and will introduce diagnostic testing for behavioral and learning disorders and Autism to families at affordable cost, Langley said.

“We are excited to welcome the team of psychologists from St. Raphael Counseling to Catholic Charities,” said Amparo García, interim president and CEO of Catholic Charities of Denver. “Under Dr. Langley’s guidance, and with his expertise and business acumen, the team has built a trusted and professional counseling service that is faithful to the Church and compassionate to those in need.

“We are optimistic that offering expanded services in a combined organization will provide an added benefit to the community.”

St. Raphael’s offers individuals, couples and families clinical counseling services for issues ranging from depression and anxiety to grief and addiction. It also offers marriage preparation, school counseling, psychological evaluations for seminary applicants, and counseling for priests and religious. It provides outreach and education through presentations and retreats that integrate psychology and spirituality.

St. Raphael’s is named after the Archangel Raphael, who in the Old Testament Book of Tobit is sent by God to help the young man Tobias confront nature and evil. Raphael helps to bring healing to Tobias’ family. Of Hebrew origin, Raphael means “God heals.”

“The name was chosen very deliberately,” Langley said. “We [as therapists] are only instruments of God’s healing, God’s medicine; it’s ultimately God who heals.

“One of the ways the Lord has given us as a path to holiness is through our own brokenness,” he added. “We all have emotional wounds and the healing of these wounds helps us to become the saints God made us to be.

“We work with individuals and families to help them face their woundedness, their brokenness. We do it in a way that is supportive of their Catholic values and can leverage all the awesome, beautiful things about Catholic spirituality that can help us grow as people.”

The recent suicides of celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain and fashion designer Kate Spade show that no one is immune from depression and suicidal thoughts, Langley said.

“Even St. Therese [of Lisieux] said there were moments when she was tempted by the medicine bottle on the nightstand,” he noted about the saint who was named a Doctor of the Church in 1997. “We think of her as being a joyful saint, yet she too struggled immensely with depression.

“If people are struggling, they need help,” Langley said. “But counseling isn’t just for people with big issues. It’s also for those who have normal issues and are trying to have a healthy family life.

“There’s nobody who doesn’t need support and good human relationships.”

RAPHAEL COUNSELING

Visit: straphaelcounseling.com

Phone: 720-377-1359