Broncos’ prayers are answered

Julie Filby
Jesuit Father Philip Steele, left, at the AFC Championship game Jan. 19, with Alan Carruthers, principal of Regis Jesuit's Boys Division.

“For a Broncos’ victory, let us pray to the Lord.”

This, according to Jesuit Father Philip Steele, was among the prayers of the faithful at a private team Mass for the Denver Broncos on the eve of the Jan. 19 AFC championship game when he requested special intentions.

“I’m always kind of delicate when it comes to what we pray for during the prayers of the faithful,” he clarified. Generally intentions include that each player play to the best of his ability, be protected from injury, and that existing injuries heal.

But particularly that night, victory was on the minds and hearts of 15 players, coaches and family members gathered for a 7:30 p.m. liturgy at the team hotel. And victory was the outcome the next day when they defeated the New England Patriots 26-16 to advance to Super Bowl XLVIII Feb. 2 in East Rutherford, N.J., where they will take on the Seattle Seahawks.

“I honestly believe God didn’t care if the Broncos or the Patriots won,” said Father Steele, who’s served as a chaplain for the Broncos for eight years. “But he cares that we do.”

Father Steele is the president of Aurora’s Regis Jesuit High School, whose Jesuit community has ministered to the Broncos since the school moved their campus to Aurora in 1990, just 3 miles from the team’s Dove Valley headquarters in Centennial.

“It’s a fun way to minister, I enjoy it,” said the Denver native and longtime Broncos’ fan. “Particularly this year under Jack’s leadership. They really want to be there (at Mass). They’re serious about commending their efforts to God.”

“Jack” is Jack Del Rio, second-year defensive coordinator, and a parishioner of St. Vincent de Paul in Denver.

Another area priest, Father Terry Kissell, pastor of St. Michael the Archangel in Aurora, also had an opportunity to minister within the NFL last weekend, celebrating Mass for the visiting Patriots.

“I like the Patriots, I have for years,” said Father Kissell, who regularly visits family near Boston. “It sounded like a once in a lifetime opportunity.”

He learned of it through an email blast from the archdiocese’s Office of Priest Personnel, who received the Mass request from the Patriots’ representative at the Westin Denver Downtown Hotel. Father Kissell was first to respond to the request.

Arriving at the Westin at 5:30 p.m. Jan. 18, he was escorted to a conference room under tight security to celebrate a half-hour Mass—additional team meetings were scheduled for 6 p.m.

In a short homily, the “most abbreviated I’ve given in years,” he said, he referenced the day’s Scripture, as well as Boston Strong, reminding the five men gathered that Boston Nation is everywhere—even on “foreign turf.”

“I couldn’t identify if they were players,” Father Kissel said of the five men attending, though he did recognize team owner Robert Kraft when he was leaving the hotel.

“I thanked them for being at the Mass,” he said. “It shows how much they value it.”

COMING UP: PHOTO GALLERY: Celebrate Life march and rally 2017

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On Saturday, Jan. 14, hundreds gathered at the state capitol for the Celebrate Life march and rally. A crowd filled with pro-life advocates both young and old marched down the streets of downtown Denver in what was an impressive show of pro-life support. Masses were held at several parishes in Denver beforehand, including the Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception, and the rally featured addresses by Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila, Real Life Catholic founder Chris Stefanick, and former Planned Parenthood employee turned pro-life advocate Abby Johnson.

Denver Catholic photographer Andrew Wright was there to capture the joyful occasion.

All photos by Andrew Wright

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The Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception was filled to standing room only for the Mass prior to the rally and march.

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An overwhelming number of young people came to the march, proving that a new generation of pro-life advocates is on the rise.

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Archbishop Aquila addressed the crowd gathered outside the capitol, urging them to not be afraid to stand up for life in the public square.

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Real Life Catholic founder Chris Stefanick riled the crowd with an enthusiastic talk before the march. He also pointed out that the term “life” does not apply solely to the unborn; he said the march was also a protest for immigrants, the homeless and the sick.

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Abby Johnson, who has gained fame for becoming a fierce pro-life advocate after being employed by Planned Parenthood, also addressed the crowd. She noted that the pro-life movement has changed and is no longer simply about defending the unborn; she called it a “pro-woman” movement.

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The wide array of ethnicities and cultural backgrounds at the march showed that the act of defending life crosses boundaries and is a sign of universal love and care.

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Doves were released before the march as a symbol of the presence of the Holy Spirit.

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The march filled the length of the streets of Denver and spilled over onto the sidewalks. Police escorts were there to ensure the march could progress safely and uninterrupted.